Author Topic: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V  (Read 158268 times)

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Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #315 on: November 03, 2006, 08:50:03 AM »
Exhibtions would be fantastic but they really dotake a long time to implement.  Textiles, almost more than any other museum object are the most difficult and fragile to both transport and display owing to their fragility.  Dresses of the late 19th century are even more so as they were tin-weighted, a chemical treatment used to create a distinctive rustling quality to the silk. This treatment causes the silk to shatter in surviving garments and so removal and display is either hugely expensive or simply not allowed. 

Offline royal_netherlands

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #316 on: November 03, 2006, 11:15:45 AM »
First of all thank you fore all the information, it is really interesting.
But know you’re talking about Queen Alexandra's clothes here is a link to British Pathe where there are a few pictures of Queen Alexandra's dresses. (It's about Edwardian fashion)


RN :)
« Last Edit: February 16, 2013, 04:21:27 AM by Svetabel »

Offline Zanthia

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #317 on: November 03, 2006, 11:36:16 AM »
Was she so poor that she had to re-use her wedding dress for other occasions?! I think not.  :-\

No, of course she was'nt.  :D But remember she came from a home, were everything was used and re-used if possible. She was brought up with that nothing should go to waste. Later she overcomed this old habit, but as a newlywed she still had this opinion deep inside her and she probably felt that it was a terrible waste, if this dress and all it's laces and ornaments should only be used once.
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Offline Grace

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #318 on: November 03, 2006, 03:14:43 PM »
I don't think QA ever completely overcame the habits of her youth, when her family had little money.  There is a story which I am not completely clear on, where she insisted on a beautiful brocade dress she couldn't wear any more be taken apart to cover some chairs with.

I like this characteristic, anyway -- waste not, want not!  ;D

Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #319 on: February 29, 2012, 04:22:28 AM »
I don't think QA ever completely overcame the habits of her youth, when her family had little money.  There is a story which I am not completely clear on, where she insisted on a beautiful brocade dress she couldn't wear any more be taken apart to cover some chairs with.

I like this characteristic, anyway -- waste not, want not!  ;D

She did unpick six of her brocade dresses to cover chairs in Sandringham.  I have a copy of a document written by one of her dressers after her death informing Queen Mary that this had been carried out in the 1880s.  Have emailed the Royal Collection to see if the chairs are still there but no luck so far

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #320 on: February 29, 2012, 09:13:04 AM »
They must have been special chairs. I wonder how many of Queen Alexandra's many dresses (other than her wedding & coronation dresses) survived.

Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #321 on: February 29, 2012, 12:08:32 PM »
Well in total I now have discovered in excess of 100 objects of dress and accessories that relate to Queen Alexandra surviving in various museums around the world.  This includes more ephemeral objects such as handkerchiefs but it is still a sizeable collection all told.  They are just so far scattered which makes it more complex in terms of considering it as a 'whole' collection.

Offline Eddie_uk

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #322 on: February 29, 2012, 12:09:56 PM »
That is fascinating Kate! What random museums have items turned up in?? Makes one wonder how they ended up there! :)
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Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #323 on: February 29, 2012, 01:52:53 PM »
Thanks Kate.  ;) I think your book will be one I will be happy to buy and read. Some of her clothes I read was dispersed during her lifetime. She also given some objects to friends...or even strangers (in her older years) when no visitor was allowed to leave Sandringham without a souvenir from the blessed lady herself. 

Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #324 on: March 01, 2012, 03:48:53 AM »
There are two dresses in the Bunka Gauken Museum in Japan, three in Oslo (obviously thanks to Maud) only one in Copenhagen surprisingly, seven in Canada, lots in New York, three in Liverpool, five in the Fashion Museum Bath, various museums in London have them and so the list goes on.  It is endlessly fascinating and I now have a little over a year to tie it all up.  The routes are usually via servants, particularly dressers or housekeepers who were gifted items.  So much to learn from each garment as well.  My PhD completes next year and then....hopefully....a publisher!

Offline Eddie_uk

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #325 on: March 01, 2012, 05:58:07 AM »
Oh Good luck! It sounds wonderful!
Amazing to think some items found there way to Japan!
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Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #326 on: March 01, 2012, 02:42:38 PM »
Not too surprising though, Japan has a very good textile museum due to its interests in silk garments. In fact Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna (niece of Queen Alexandra) usually put on a kimono before she dresses for the evening. That museum is really worth it visit from what I hear and has an extensive collection. Not surprising that they should have a dress worn by the fashionable Edwardian Queen. If you come to New York for research, should really meet up.

Offline Yelena Aleksandrovna

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #327 on: March 14, 2012, 03:42:04 PM »
I didn't remember to see this photo of Queen Alexandra's coronation. It reminds me a bit her daughter Louise. Sorry for the watermarks!  :(

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #328 on: March 15, 2012, 09:44:35 AM »
Queen Alexandra chose Indian dress material for her coronation gown. The type of material rich Indian brides use in their weddings even today.

Offline Olga Maria

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part V
« Reply #329 on: June 13, 2012, 02:51:13 AM »
Alexandra and a dog (from the Royal Collection)


Alexandra and baby Louise


Amazing colored fotos  by the most wonderful Yelena Aleksandrovna. Endless thank you very much!