Author Topic: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...  (Read 13813 times)

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Offline Taren

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2006, 06:41:39 PM »
I agree, I'm not a fan of 'makey-uppy' names. I think it's cruel to saddle a child with a ridiculous name like (for example) 'Brooklyn'.  :P

Gee I wonder to whom you could be referring?  ;D

Celebrity baby names are the worst as far as "unique" names go. Pilot Inspektor? Moxie Crimefighter? Fifi Trixiebelle? On what planet would those names be considered tasteful? There's nothing wrong with having a normal name that doesn't stick out. Chances are your kid is going to be teased anyway, so why give the other children ammunition? This coming from someone whose first name is used by at least two porn stars....

Offline Prince_Christopher

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2006, 06:42:31 PM »

And am I the only one here who thinks it is incredible that Condoleezza Rice has managed to overcome her name?  She has accomplished so much in her life- but I'm betting there aren't many parents naming daughters after her!



I read that Condi's parents, being musicians, named her after the Italian musical term "con dolcezza" meaning "with sweetness," which I think is ok, being that it reflected their love and profession.  However, the contrived spelling was not such a good idea, in my opinion.
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Offline emeraldeyes

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2006, 01:29:06 PM »
I read that Condi's parents, being musicians, named her after the Italian musical term "con dolcezza" meaning "with sweetness," which I think is ok, being that it reflected their love and profession.  However, the contrived spelling was not such a good idea, in my opinion.

I hadn't been aware of that, so I really thank you for pointing that out.  I will tell my husband (who is studying for his gr 9 piano) and that will be one Italian term he will always be able to remember.   ;)
I think 'Dolcezza' would be a lovely name on its own however, and when pronounced properly by a gentleman caller would be absolutely swoon-inducing.    ::)     

 Dol - chayzaaaahhh , mi amore... (faints)
An intelligent Hell would be better than a stupid paradise.  - Victor Hugo


Offline imperial angel

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2006, 11:57:06 AM »
Is anybody here just plain interested in names in general as I am? It doesn't have to be for any good reason, it can just be that you are interested.I am fascinated by names, especially Victorian ones. I like foreign names as well. I am interested in names, even more than their connotations.

David_Pritchard

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #19 on: October 04, 2006, 05:26:52 PM »
Dear Imperial Angel,

I am interested in onamastics* just as you are. Let me give you some examples of some Victorian names from my own family that now sound unusual:

Philomenia Catherina - my maternal grandmother's given names. Born 1888.

Georgius - My maternal grandfather's middle name. Born 1881.

Josephine - mother of Philomenia Catherina. Born 1856.


David

* Onamastics is the study of names and naming practices.

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #20 on: October 04, 2006, 06:27:48 PM »
I enjoy onamastics (thank you for supplying the term, David) etymology and history of first names as well and just the plain old discussion of why a certain royal had his/her name.

My own great-grandmother was Josephine.  :)

When it came time to name my own children, I looked into our family trees but all the grandmothers have very 'grandmotherly' names--Florence, Shirley, Geraldine and Marion.

My husband always laughs at how I decide on the first and middle names. I like one or both to reflect our ethnic roots (Irish, Scottish, English, German), a family connection, our Catholic background (ie a Saint's name) and a historical and/or literary figure that I enjoy. It helps with narrowing it down some but I have enough names picked out for about 15 kids I  wish the old days of giving the kids more than 2 names was still commonplace.  :)
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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David_Pritchard

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #21 on: October 04, 2006, 08:12:26 PM »
There is no rule against a third given name, so give your children three names. By the way my paternal grandmother was named Violet. Born 1899. This is not a very common name presently either.

Did you notice that the man who shot the Amish children yesterday had redundant first names, Charles Carl? Who is so stupid not to known that this is the same name in different languages both originating from the ancient name Carolus?

David

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #22 on: October 04, 2006, 09:13:07 PM »
Believe me, I considered going around the 'just 2 names' rule but I'm too hidebound, I suppose.  :)

I predict that Violet will undergo a renaissance in the next few years due to the fact that Ben Affleck & Jennifer Garner picked it for their baby--I think it was one of their grandmother's names. Celebrity has that affect--especially if the moniker isn't too out-there. I don't foresee a boom in the name Pilot Inspektor or Moxie Crimefighter--and the fact that I know which celebrities those children belong to is rather disturbing.  ;)
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Offline Caleb

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #23 on: October 04, 2006, 09:24:50 PM »
My sister & brother-in-law (Chris & Audrey Hohenboken) chose Swedish & German names for their three boys (however the oldest boy is named Jeff; aka JJ) then there's Wilmarth (Marty) Lars (Lonnie) & Karsten (Kit) Speaking of Germanic sounding names, one of my great-grandmothers was named Wilhelmina.

Offline Prince_Christopher

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #24 on: October 04, 2006, 10:06:43 PM »
There is no rule against a third given name, so give your children three names. By the way my paternal grandmother was named Violet. Born 1899. This is not a very common name presently either.

Did you notice that the man who shot the Amish children yesterday had redundant first names, Charles Carl? Who is so stupid not to known that this is the same name in different languages both originating from the ancient name Carolus?

David

I think Violet is a lovely name....

The redundancy of names is interesting to me too.  I did notice the Charles Carl thing.  Also, giving two forms of the same name to two children in one family is very irritating, unless there are extenuating circumstances.  I know a family with brothers James and Jimmy, another with brothers Bobby and Robert, and yet another with sisters Patricia and Patsy.  I also know an unfortunate little girl whose name is actually Vicky Victoria.  It is listed on her birth certificate that way!  :-\

An ancestor of mine named a younger son William, after an older son (also named William) who had died in (I think) the Civil War.  I think that is an exception to the rudundant name thing....
« Last Edit: October 04, 2006, 10:22:25 PM by Prince_Christopher »
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David_Pritchard

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #25 on: October 04, 2006, 10:23:10 PM »
I think Violet is a lovely name....

The redundancy of names is interesting to me too.  I did notice the Charles Carl thing.  Also, giving two forms of the same name to two children in one family is very irritating, unless there are extenuating circumstances.  I know a family with brothers James and Jimmy, another with brothers Bobby and Robert, and yet another with sisters Patricia and Patsy.  I also know an unfortunate little girl whose name is actually Vicky Victoria.  It is listed on her birth certificate that way!  :-\

Where is it that you are from? Oklahoma, West Virginia, Alabama?

Here are a few official names on birth certificates that I despise: Sonny, Buddy, Junior, Woody and Gordy.

David


David_Pritchard

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #26 on: October 04, 2006, 10:32:39 PM »
An ancestor of mine named a younger son William, after an older son (also named William) who had died in (I think) the Civil War.  I think that is an exception to the rudundant name thing....

This is an acceptable practice in some cultures but seen as bad luck in other traditions. Usually it is a nephew that is named after a deceased uncle as in my case, my middle name is Ashley after my uncle First Lieutenant Ashley Filer Pritchard USAAC (1922-1943), who was shot down by Japanese anti-aircraft fire not far from the South Pacific island of Guadalcanal. A younger cousin of mine was also named after the Army Air Corps pilot, Ashley William Pritchard, William being our paternal grandfather's middle name. As for my first name David, my great grandfather's brother was David Pritchard as was my great grandfather's uncle. Until a few years ago, I had a novogenarian great uncle, Wesley Filer, and cousin Wesley Pritchard who was named after him. It would seem that for the past five generations or at least from around 1800, the male members of my family have been given recycled first and middle names.

David
« Last Edit: October 04, 2006, 10:52:07 PM by David_Pritchard »

Offline Taren

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #27 on: October 04, 2006, 10:33:51 PM »
UGH - I DESPISE giving nicknames or shortned names as actual names. I also can't stand Lee/Leigh and Lynn as middle names. It's like the parents didn't even try. Charlie Sheen's daughter is named Sam. Would it have killed him to make it Samantha, but call her Sam? Courteney Cox and David Arquette's daughter's name is Coco. It sounds like a name you'd give a poodle. I understand why they couldn't name her Courteney, like they wanted, but maybe they could've gone with Sarah or Katherine or something. Johnny Cash's brother was Jack, so the family had a John and a Jack. I honestly think that before parents name children, they should have to have the name voted on by a panel to see if it is suitable or not. Don't some countries have laws about naming children? I know in Spain you can't give your kid a name that is gender neutral -apparently this was going to be a problem with one of the Beckham boys.

David_Pritchard

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #28 on: October 04, 2006, 10:42:46 PM »
In Germany, given names are strictly regulated to prevent any children from being named Moon Unit. I believe that Finland and Sweden have similar laws.

David

Offline Prince_Christopher

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #29 on: October 04, 2006, 11:27:50 PM »
I honestly think that before parents name children, they should have to have the name voted on by a panel to see if it is suitable or not.

LOL, Taren, but so true....
Anyone who has a library and a garden wants for nothing.
--Cicero