Author Topic: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...  (Read 27863 times)

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Constantinople

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #75 on: April 23, 2010, 12:42:54 PM »
Grace
the answer to your question is no.  and because this is a polite forum, I can't discuss what makes me toss and turn at nights but it certainly isn't rhetorical questions.

Naslednik Norvezhskiy

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #76 on: April 24, 2010, 09:50:32 AM »
Quote
What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
Or bad....
The name on all educated lips these days is of course Eyjafjallajökull. (Or "that Icelandic volcano" on less educated lips.)

The Russians write it Эйяфьядлайёкюдль because it is actually pronounced [ˈeiːjafjatlajœːkʏtl̥], or /Eh-ya-fyat-la-yuh-cuttle/ in English orthography.

Icelandic shares so-called segmentation with Faroese and Western Norwegian dialects, including my own native one*: A long sound, like the double consonant /ll/, is segmented into two sounds: /tl/ or /dl/. Old Norse fjall, mountain, thus becomes fjatl. BTW Eyjafjallajökull means Glacier** of the Island Mountains. The ey part, meaning "island", is the same as the first part in English "island", which is pronounced according to its Germanic origin /'ailæn/ (compare Dutch eiland), but the spelling is influenced by Old French isle.

* While still going strong on Iceland and the Faroe Islands, it is rapidly disappearing from Western Norwegian dialects, though. Soon we will be back to the original Old Norse system, which we started to mess with 1000 years ago.
** Jökull, glacier, is cognate with English "icicle"!
« Last Edit: April 24, 2010, 10:12:15 AM by Fyodor Petrovich »

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #77 on: April 24, 2010, 09:58:48 AM »
Fyodor

You never fail us!

Ann

Alixz

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #78 on: April 24, 2010, 10:13:47 AM »
Or never fail to show off.

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #79 on: April 24, 2010, 10:20:52 AM »
I am giving FP the benefit of the doubt.

Ann

Naslednik Norvezhskiy

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #80 on: April 24, 2010, 01:34:09 PM »
My target audience is always fellow nerds with a geeky love of sharing useful as well as useless knowledge and playing intellectual parlour games.
To others I may appear pathetic and arrogant and frankly I don't care.

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #81 on: April 24, 2010, 02:48:00 PM »
Fear not. My head is stuffed full of obscure information and I have an irrestistible compulsion to share it with the world.

Constantinople

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #82 on: April 24, 2010, 03:19:01 PM »
I dont think he cares if you share your knowledge just that he wants to imbue others with his esoterica.

Naslednik Norvezhskiy

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #83 on: April 24, 2010, 03:30:48 PM »
I dont think he cares if you share your knowledge just that he wants to imbue others with his esoterica.

Answer some of the questions in this thread and I will love you as a fellow geek. :-)

Offline Margot

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #84 on: April 26, 2010, 09:22:06 AM »
Let's be honest FP's posts are always beautifully written and he is never rude or ill-mannered! His contributions may go over many of our heads and may sometimes make one feel a little out of one's depth, but what he shares here is quite amazing and sometimes quite interesting! I for one, am saddened that others would react with hostility to another person wanting to share their encyclopedic knowledge here with us! I agree with Ella and Ann! I will admit that sometimes I do skim FP's more 'complex' posts, but others may find them useful and interesting! Everyone is different! Contempt for a source of such knowledge is to me, the antithesis of what this forum is all about!!!!
« Last Edit: April 26, 2010, 09:31:11 AM by Margot »

Alixz

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #85 on: April 26, 2010, 09:33:00 AM »
I never mind someone sharing their "encyclopedic knowledge", I am opposed to the way in which it is done.

I will now ask for sources for all of the information, just as we do in other sub forums and thread. 

No more posting without confirmable sources in English.  This is forum policy.

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #86 on: April 26, 2010, 09:34:13 AM »
Some of FP's posts go over my head as well, but the Forum would be the poorer without them! And FP can cope with having his leg pulled (which is the crucial test).

Ann

Alixz

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #87 on: April 26, 2010, 09:45:32 AM »
The crucial test for what?  Whose leg is being pulled?

And if the information posted goes over one's head then nothing is being learned or passed on.

I agree with Constantinople:
I don't think he cares if you share your knowledge just that he wants to imbue others with his esoterica.

Lets get back to the topic at hand.


Naslednik Norvezhskiy

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #88 on: January 12, 2011, 09:50:25 PM »
How do my esteemed fellow forum members feel about the fact that when HM Queen Margrethe returns to Marselisborg at Easter, the city surrounding it, known as Århus the last time HM visited, will have renamed itself Aarhus, for the sake of keyboard-challenged foreigners who allegedly couldn't be bothered to write Århus when googling business and vacation opportunities and/or were ever so confused as to whether Århus, Aarhus and the typo Arhus were different cities?

(Granted, the city was called Aarhus untill 1948, when the letter combination aa (originally a long /a:/ or ah sound, but in modern times the sound /o:/, as in English "raw") was replaced with the originally Swedish letter å. (The ring represents a small superscript a, just like the dots in ö and ü represent a small superscript Gothic e.)

Originally the name Árhús means "house by the stream", from the genitive case of á, aa or modern Danish å, stream (cognate with French eau and with the same pronunciation) and hus, house. Both Aarhus and Århus are pronounced : [ˈ ɒː huː ːˀs], simplified /'o:r'hu:s/ or in English orthography somewhat like Awr-hoos.

Just appropriate in a modern English-dominated globalized world, unpatriotic catering to foreign sensibilities or a sad loss of something that makes Denmark Danish?

The theme also extends into the naming of the new royal twins. Fat chance they will be called Jørgen, Søren, Jørgine or Hjørdis....
« Last Edit: January 12, 2011, 10:02:34 PM by Фёдор Петрович »

Naslednik Norvezhskiy

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #89 on: March 13, 2011, 03:44:59 PM »
It is sort of like the stupidity during the first Gulf War when Americans started calling French Fries Freedom Fries because the French would not send troops into combat at that time. (Americans didn't stop eating the fries, though.)

Too bad the Surgeon General didn't take it as a great propaganda opportunity in the War on Obesity and demand they be renamed Fatness Fries!
« Last Edit: March 13, 2011, 03:47:59 PM by Фёдор Петрович »