Author Topic: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...  (Read 15386 times)

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David_Pritchard

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #30 on: October 04, 2006, 11:37:31 PM »
Believe me, I considered going around the 'just 2 names' rule but I'm too hidebound, I suppose.  :)

You have introduced me to a new word, 'hidebound', I had to look it up because I thought that you were wanting to write 'herd bound'. Either word would have worked in the sentence but they have different meanings. Where did you learn this uncommon word?

David

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #31 on: October 05, 2006, 06:58:03 AM »
I don't know where I first picked it up--maybe from my late grandmother who was born in 1902. I didn't even realize it was unusual! People have teased me since I was a child for using words that are old-fashioned.
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Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #32 on: October 05, 2006, 08:09:54 AM »
This is a good site when it comes to researching names: http://www.behindthename.com/

My grandparents (all born in the 1920s/30s) are called John, Mary, Nuala and Patrick - all very typical of the time, but not very popular any more.
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Offline Ra-Ra-Rasputin

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #33 on: October 05, 2006, 08:56:14 AM »
Nuala is a very pretty name, Liam! You can tell your nan that from me!

Victorian names are so en vogue in the UK at the moment.  I work with kids over the summer, and I met so many 'old lady' named children.  Alice, Kitty, Flora, Stella, Ruby, etc.  Apparently the names to go for now if you want your child to be different are 1950's names.  Susan, Patricia, etc.  They're coming back!! I know of a baby called Brenda even..

Rachel
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Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #34 on: October 05, 2006, 10:25:51 AM »
Lol, thanks Rachel, she'll be delighted. I think it's a dimunitive of 'Fionnuala'.

I done some work experience in a primary school two years ago, and I found Irish names very popular - Tadge (is that how you spell that??), Rianna, Ailbhe etc. Also, my sister's name (Emma) is apparently hugely popular in the US at the moment.
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Offline emeraldeyes

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #35 on: October 05, 2006, 12:00:04 PM »
I also can't stand Lee/Leigh and Lynn as middle names. It's like the parents didn't even try.

 Courteney Cox and David Arquette's daughter's name is Coco. It sounds like a name you'd give a poodle.


My middle name is Lynn.  So is my sister's.  So maybe they didn't really try that hard. 

My older cat is named Coco - after Coco Chanel, naturally.

My husband's family had a tradition of naming the first born son of the first born son Henry.  This lasted until my husband's eldest brother - Henry Daniel - named his first son Jesse.  He would have been the ninth I think.  Such a shame to see a long tradition lke that go down the tubes. 




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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #36 on: October 05, 2006, 03:48:57 PM »
As traditional as I am (or hidebound as it were  ;) ), I chucked that tradition. I wasn't against my husband's name, Robert, except that they are all over both sides of our family, but his middle name is Norman.  :-\ His brother is James Orville Jr and he ditched it as well.  ;) My brother is William Wallace III but he didn't have a son--yet!
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Offline Caleb

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #37 on: October 05, 2006, 06:19:28 PM »
My paternal grandmother's first name is Amilee (pronounced like "Emily") I'm assuming it's a southern name. My grandma was a farm girl in Georgia.

Offline imperial angel

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #38 on: October 10, 2006, 10:36:24 AM »
I love Victorian names.. it's nice to know that they in vogue now in the UK. I like them so much, but they are seldom used. My own name is largely overused now, although it was more unique to begin with. I don't like any current names, one way or the other. I like foreign names, but most people don't, sadly. I do like my first name, but have never cared for my middle one. I also dislike being called Gracie, which people have before. It isn't even a nickname, I might point out, because it isn't shorter. ;) I have often been told by people they like my name, which is great. No one seems to dislike it, although that is perhaps because Grace has been overly popular in the past few years.

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #39 on: October 10, 2006, 03:48:08 PM »
Does a nickname have to be shorter? Mine include Liamo, Liamee and Liamee-eye-oh (all admittedly horrible  ;D)
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Offline Kimberly

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #40 on: October 10, 2006, 03:56:10 PM »
Grace is extremely popular in my neck of the woods as is Ruby, Hope, Poppy, Maisie....... these are such a refreshing change from Codee-lee, Tanishkaah et al (and with these "madey-uppy" names I so often hear "oh, I don't know how we spell it :o)
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David_Pritchard

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #41 on: October 10, 2006, 09:27:55 PM »
I was able to break open a name this afternoon. All that was inside were a few pieces stale candy, a quarter and some pocket lint. Who would have ever known!

Offline imperial angel

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #42 on: October 11, 2006, 08:09:28 AM »
Well, we sure are going on and on about names on these threads.. ;)

Offline Penny_Wilson

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #43 on: October 11, 2006, 01:29:36 PM »
Some more fuel for the fire:  "Baby's Named a Bad, Bad Thing: A Primer on Parental Cruelty"

http://www.notwithoutmyhandbag.com/babynames/

Who could help but shed a tear for the little boy named "Toolio DeSac"?

+++++++

For almost the whole of 1999/2000 school year, I was a long-term substitute teacher in a private middle school (the kids were about 11-13ish).  On my first day, as I was doing roll-call, several of the "fancier" names posed pronunciation difficulties, but nothing I couldn't handle.  Until I got to the "S"'s in the alphabet -- there was ONE name that I can't write here because it's spelled like a popular eight-letter word -- plus an "e."  Suffice it to say, the (very jaded) little girl informed me that her name was pronounced "Shee-THAY-dee," and no, she had no idea what her parents were thinking about.

I almost called them to ask...  ::)

+++++++

Oh!  Edited to add another one:  When I was in high school biology, my lab partner was named Stewart Stuart.  Or maybe it was Stuart Stewart.  I don't know what was going on there, either.

« Last Edit: October 11, 2006, 01:37:53 PM by Penny_Wilson »
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Offline Janet_W.

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Re: What's in a name? That which we call a rose would smell as sweet...
« Reply #44 on: October 11, 2006, 02:50:25 PM »
My reply to the question used in this thread's title (with thanks to "Bill" Shakespeare): A lot is in a name . . . and a lot isn't. In other words, while first impressions are important, people can determine how others will perceive them via their conduct, and a name that might seem awkward, unattractive or even heinous can be neutralized, or even made attractive, if the owner of that name is a decent person.

On the other hand, parents often give a child a name out of their own questionable sense of humor, or for reasons of ego, or due to family pressures, or whatever. But they don't think of the child, and what effect this will have on the child. And that, to me, is Consideration #1.

P.S. As for a bizarre name giving a person character, as is considered via the "Boy Named Sue" song . . . you'll note that at the end of that song, when the father informs his son  the difficult name has made him stronger--a real man--so isn't he glad he was given that name . . .  the otherwise forebearing narrator replies with a resounding "NO!"   ;^)