Author Topic: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution  (Read 25399 times)

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Offline BRITISH_BLUE

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #30 on: October 08, 2004, 10:56:34 PM »
Janet,

One of the most enduring myths in life is that the poor want to work, are looking for work, and when they find work  are wonderful, willing workers.  Another myth is that the bosses are out to hire people in order to exploit them, to underpay them, then not  content with this are willing to dispense  with their services when migrant  workers come along, men or women willing to do the same job  for  less money. Its all untrue and is simply a emotional / fictional theme well exploited in old B & W movies.

When i say untrue I concede that in certain USA farm States this did occasionally happen and some of the gangmasters were a shameful lot. This argument also applies to the Victorian Coal mining industry throughout Europe, but it was the Unions who fought to improve  conditions and wages and who forced changes.

Another now long forgotten exploitation system  was the PEONAGE, used in 1920s wayward Southern States, but lets be honest goood thinking people [ mostly Quakers] agitated in a respectable  manner for  change.  You then have the worst form of mans inhumanity to man in Slavery, it still flourishes and Yes the English did take a leading part in this trade [we were the best slavetraders and pirates ever] but it was abolished by the efforts of one William Wilberforce, a lone English crusader and the pirates were hung when captured.

The underlying theme [here] is peaceful change... peaceful change for the better. In  other words you quietly replace people, and hopefully improve the lot of the majority. You mention the idle poor - becoming the idle rich. Occasionally it did happen and the results were hilarious. Its happening today and all societys have their ample share of millionaires and billionaires - except Russia and the old Soviet block. But it will happen.

ROBERT. Titles, I have met a  number of very famous titled people, it was a pleasure. Was i impressed you bet I was.  What I did find disheartening was seeing the new-rich trying to pass themselves off as people  of worth. A small number were insufferable, some were likeable rogues, and  I found it interesting. The problem with wealth is some can handle it  - but 95% of the population can''t. Broken marriages are wealth stories, not  human affairs breakdowns.

RSKKIYA. An English, Socialist, Schoolteacher, who should be sent to the Congo to work in an Hospital - in order to lose her fragile grip on irrelevancies. Aids in Russia. I was saddened to learn that this was becoming an Epidemic. My daughter's just returned from Africa, she was in an Aids area, and she said she saw each day hearse led  funeral processions. It was a very common sight. She mentioned seeing as many as upto 50 in a day, mostly Aids deaths. It appears men in this region like sex with young girls, 11 and 12 is the popular age, and child prostitutes are common, of course they are all infected. It appears  condoms are ignored. Aids is something we need to do something about and isolation  may one day have to be used. I'm suggesting  Aids colonies throughout the world. .

Dashcova. Almost opposite[to the right of]  the Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg, is the Peter and Paul Fortress, an old prison.  Its reputation was awesome, the Communists targeted this and stormed it. Once inside they found just 3 elderly prisoners who did not want to leave  its quarters. The prison had been disused for years and there was no execution cells, no torture chambers, no starving prisoners. So Lenin and Co, dreamt up some fairy story about this prison and how grateful the victims were to  be freed. They put it about that all the dreadful rumours were true, that the Tsar had killed thousands in its cells. No  one queried why there was no ''photographs  appearing in the newspapers of the prisoner releases, no photographs of ex-prisoners in their cells, and no instant  mini- biographies of prisoners. It was all a myth, and so are your Tsar stories. Fables, just untrue rediculous fables.



             

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by BRITISH_BLUE »

rskkiya

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #31 on: October 08, 2004, 11:11:20 PM »
Quote
RSKKIYA. An English, Socialist, Schoolteacher, who should be sent to the Congo to work in an Hospital - in order to lose her fragile grip on irrelevancies. Aids in Russia. I was saddened to learn that this was becoming an Epidemic. My daughter's just returned from Africa, she was in an Aids area, and she said each day all you saw was hearse led  funeral processions. It was a very common sight. She mentioned as many as seeing upto 50 in a day, all Aids deaths. It appears men in this region like sex with young girls, 11 and 12 is the popular age, and child prostitutes are common, of course they are all infected. It appears  condoms are ignored. Aids is something we need to do something about and isolation  may one day have to be used. I'm suggesting  Aids colonies throughout the world. .
          


BB...
I am so lost ... Aids? Yes- It is a dreadful problem all over the world! Do you want me to go to the Congo? I would if I could affort it! But as a teacher I am rather overworked and underpaid -- No No  you are so right... I'm just a lazy poor person who would rather remain a burden to society.
Sorry what has this to do with the revolution?

Rskkiya
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by rskkiya »

Offline BRITISH_BLUE

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #32 on: October 09, 2004, 02:34:35 AM »
Quote
BB...  I am so lost ...Do you want me to go to the Congo? I would if I could affort it! But as a teacher I am rather overworked and underpaid -- No No  you are so right... I'm just a lazy poor person who would rather remain a burden to society. Rskkiya


Typical Socialist clap-trap. Just listen to her will you; ''A poor person, overworked and underpaid, who would rather remain a burden to Society - but who is willing to go to the Congo if someone else, presumably, will pay''

R. I meant  Congo Town in the Bahamas  foolish fool, not that Congo, you know Kinshasa, Brazzaville, big spears, poison arrows. Well go if you must - do it, otherwise you will always regret it. But promise me No Sex with strangers, especialy tall, dark,  handsome ones. Please read the following notes before you set off. Do you notice the similiaritys with 1917 Russia.

For R, and other fellow travellers.
Information on the Republic of Congo

Civil wars and militia conflicts have plagued the Republic of Congo throughout its recent past, but hopes for stability were raised in 2003 when the government signed a peace accord with rebels in the south.  After three relatively peaceful but coup-ridden decades of independence, the former French colony experienced the first of two destructive bouts of fighting in 1993 when disputed parliamentary elections led to bloody fighting between pro-government Monarchist forces and the opposition.

A ceasefire agreement followed by the inclusion of some opposition members in the government helped to restore peace. But in 1997 political tensions exploded into a full-scale civil war, fuelled in part by the prize of the country's offshore oil wealth, rich white homes and farms for the taking, and the possibilty of plundering the nations foreign Gold Reserves, which motivated many of the warlords. The army split along ethnic lines, with most northern officers joining President Denis Sassou-Nguesso's side, and those from remote regions backing the rebels.  

By the end of 1999, the rebels had lost all their key positions to the government forces, who were backed by Angolan troops. The rebels then agreed to a ceasefire accord - which shortly thereafter they broke.
Remnants of the civil war militias, known as the Rural Initiatives continued to fight government forces in the southern region until a ''Lets-split-the loot deal'' was signed in March 2003.

Bye - Bye R.

R. Please keep in touch. I am so proud to have been able to start you on your very first revolutionary journey and to throw you into your own nighmare situation. Please take your soap box with you and inform all and sundry you are there to create a caring - sharing society and ask them what do they care to contribute. What an hero..........meanwhile anyone care to join me in the Bahamas.  

p.s. R the men in the Congo prefer girls 11 to 12. Do you not think you might be too old, I''d hate to think your sat in Ricks Bar, all alone, with no takers? [BB]
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by BRITISH_BLUE »

Dashkova

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #33 on: October 09, 2004, 05:32:37 AM »
BB,
Unfortunately I cannot say what I really think about you here on this board; suffice to say I think you need your head examined. I am grateful to know and have known a number of British people so that I will not feel compelled to judge all by the likes of you.  Your words and views are not only archaic, they are deplorable.  It is sad people such as yourself continue to exist.

The Congo has nothing to do with this website.  Your tirades and diatribes are mostly unread, because they either speak about the importance of "one's place" (you seem to be in a minority of one here in that regard) or ramble far from the topic at hand. That's not so bad if it's good writing and interesting to read.  Yours are neither.

As to the Pyotr i Pavel Fortress, you write as though I am not acquainted with it.  I've walked all over the grounds and spent a few hours inside, including many of the cells and one that (for a few minutes) was locked and plunged utterly into darkness. It is a dismal place.  I have read the memoirs of many of the former inmates (during Soviet as well as Imperial times) and your sources are wrong, pro-Imperial hogwash. The prison was not a place anyone wanted to stay, though certainly, as in other countries there are "lifers" who wouldn't know what to do with themselves were they released.  The prison has become their home.  Overwhelming, though, most inmates were grateful to leave.  And YES IT WAS USED in the years leading up to the Revolution, as many former prisoners detailed in their memoirs!

I know this doesn't feed your Bastille fantasy, but those are the facts.  Have you read the type of memoirs I have mentioned?  Have you personally spent time at the Fortress?  Would you like to live there?

To everyone: My husband and I read most of the very long, very tiresome, highly inaccurate New Yorker article last night.  A few good points are made, but most of it is the type of journalism one does not expect from that publication.  I do not see where the author has done the proper research.  Basically whomever he ran into on his journey he interviewed, taking their opinions  -- seldom any professional opinions -- and running with them.  Our feeling after reading the article is that it was written by someone who does not have a full understanding of Russian history and particularly the markers of Russian culture.

The use of the word "epidemic" is but one example of the author's sensationalistic approach. AIDS may be epidemic in Africa. It is NOT an epidemic in Russia.  This is just one of the many, many flaws in the article.  I do not have time this week to detail it further and this is off topic here, anyway. I would strongly suggest that the article should be read with not a grain, but a large chunk of salt.

Also, Mr. BB, I treated my husband and two other family members who happen to be Russian born, bred and raised, to some of your posts.  They would like to know by what authority you are holding forth on their country's history and current state.  They all stated categorically that you are wrong on most accounts and wish you would stop spreading untruths.  The women waiting on line during the 70s really confused them, as all I spoke with were of age during that time and never EVER waited on line for food. They simply visited the Gastonom and bought what they needed/wanted, including any sort of meat one could wish for. No doubt there were some shortages in the capital and in Petersburg (waiting on line is a tradition today in MANY countries, including the UK and US), but you cannot paint a huge country with such broad a brush.

These are words coming *directly* from Russian people who lived most of their lives (in one case, very long life) in the Soviet Union.  That your ideas and stories baffle them to such a degree leads me to believe that theirs are the voices of experience.

And you! You simply hold forth, spouting anything you think will help your elitist case, never minding whether it is true or false.

By the way, I and others still await your list of sources for your *opinions*.

Dashkova (that's with a K, not a C.  I realize it is you once again -- thinking you are just so clever and sly...HAH  -- referring to me as a daschund.  Bear in mind that the FA has requested several times to cease the animal-related monikers and insults. Furthermore, such insulting wordplay only enhances your already nonauthoritative reputation.  You want to be taken seriously...OH so seriously...yet you play childish games.)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Dashkova »

Dashkova

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #34 on: October 09, 2004, 05:41:06 AM »
BB wrote:
"p.s. R the men in the Congo prefer girls 11 to 12. Do you not think you might be too old, I''d hate to think your sat in Ricks Bar, all alone, with no takers?'
****************

I can't speak for "R," but I think you deserve her sharpest claws for that remark!  

rskkiya

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #35 on: October 09, 2004, 09:22:31 AM »
BB

(deep sigh)

  I have tried to be as polite with you as possible...In other posts when you wrote things that appeared "off topic" and "personally offensive" I tried to explain to you that there were various other options available to best express disagreement...
 Your last remarks are unworthy of a man who claims to be a champion of nobility and decorum.
  Yes BB I do a lot of work with "at risk" youth (some of them in detention- in my spare time.) I am a teacher, very happily married to a cyclist and in my 30s. I am not likely to visit any bars because I do not drink.
   I still do not understand why we so went off topic ...This is a thread about The Revolution not about the Congo, Aids, or your crude attempts to ridicule other members.

Please do lets just return to the topic.
R
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by rskkiya »

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #36 on: October 09, 2004, 09:31:11 AM »
Thank you Rskkiya.
Im sick of this. over FIFTEEN postings and not a word about the Revolution. A dozen more personal attacks, some of them by a user who cried "foul" when attacked themself.

I will NOT be polite this time, as I was the other day in another thread.
Stay ON TOPIC. STOP PERSONAL ATTACKS, no Cat claws., nothing.

No more warnings. next time I lock the thread.

FA

rskkiya

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #37 on: October 09, 2004, 11:22:41 AM »
This is simply my opinion...
  Sadly I do believe that a revolution was inevitable in Russia. I do not think that a socialist revolution was the best option (20/20 hindsite ;)).          
  Russia is a huge nation and I believe that Socialism works best on a very small scale. Of course no one has ever established a blueprint for the dictatorship of the proletariate (please don't read dictatorship out of context --its Marx's phrase). So a  number of attempts have offered up limited success ...Such is life.
  Any revolution is a messy thing and just as there were problems in 1905 and in the  "Glorious February" days -- there were bound to be problems in  October/November.
  Nevertheless I do think that pro or con it would have been almost impossible to stop the general publics reaction to the chaos of the late Tzarist Government.
Rskkiya
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by rskkiya »

Offline BRITISH_BLUE

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #38 on: October 09, 2004, 12:23:13 PM »
BACK TO TOPIC.

It appears that since time immemorial food shortages in Russia have been a fact of life. They  occurred during all the Tsars reigns and continued right upto to the present day. All writers agree on this, some mention  bread riots, and all blame transport difficulties, the various wars, and lack of production by farmers. Its apparent that the farmers had difficulty being paid for their crops and labour, and, so you must presume, they preferred supplying the black market economy and getting paid on the spot. This rebounded on them by Stalins savage reprisals. The following article refers: Food Shortages in Russia 1920.  By A Ransome. Marxist Org / history.

The towns suffer from lack of transport, and from the combined effect on the country of their productive weakness and of the loss of their old position as centres through which the country received its imports from abroad. Townsfolk and factory workers lack food, fuel, raw materials and much else that in a civilized State is considered a necessary of life. Thus, ten million poods of fish were caught last year, but there were no means of bringing them from the fisheries to the great industrial centres where they were most needed. Townsfolk are starving, and in winter, cold. People living in rooms in a flat, complete strangers to each other, by general agreement bring all their beds into the kitchen. In the kitchen soup is made once a day. There is a little warmth there beside the natural warmth of several human beings in a small room. There it is possible to sleep. During the whole of last winter, in the case I have in mind, there were no means of heating the other rooms, where the temperature was almost always far below freezing point.
The communist changes in farming did not encourage the peasants to produce enough food and there was widespread famine as a result. Under the New Economic Policy (NEP) March 1921 the Soviet authorities permitted farmers to grow a surplus that could be privately sold. This degree of competition meant that some farmers could get rich and they had an incentive to produce as much as they could. The policy was successful in solving the problems of famine but ran counter to communist ideals. Stalin abolished the NEP in 1928 in favour of the first Five Year Plan and set about persecuting the Kulaks (rich peasants) that it had created). By the time Lenin died in January 1924, having dominated Russia since 1917, he had made sure the Communist Party kept control of the country. He achieved this partly by introducing popular policies, but mainly by force and terror.

This situation is evident today as the following article indicates. Food Shortages in Russia 2004. / by Michele Turk, DisasterRelief.org

2004 as been a difficult year for Russia. Food shortages, coupled with political and economic turmoil and a series of natural disasters, are taking a toll. As a result, Russia and its neighbors have been forced to rely on what they call "gumanitarka" or humanitarian aid from foreign governments and relief agencies in order to survive the winter. In addition, the crisis is spilling over into neighboring countries such as Belarus, Ukraine and Moldova, creating a dire situation throughout the region. The Red Cross estimated that throughout the four countries a total of more than 70 million people are living below the poverty line.

Russia's disastrous harvest -- the worst in nearly half a century -- has created food shortages in many regions of the country. A combination of drought during the summer and heavy rain in August ruined the potato crop, and by the end of that month only half as much grain had been harvested as at the same time last year. Russian Red Cross committees have reported severe undernourishment and hunger throughout the country, and there are reports that some people have resorted to eating dogs, said Caroline Hurford, a spokeswoman for the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC) on assignment in Moscow. "People are getting really desperate," she said. "We haven't had any reports of starvation, but we can't exclude the possibility."

You then have this interesting report which claims that
Capitalism is failing in Russia: From ABQ Journal.

Things weren't supposed to work this way. Capitalism was supposed to bring prosperity. Russia's giant military ndustrial complex was supposed to convert to a peacetime consumer economy. Russia's vast natural resources -- oil, natural gas and precious metals -- were supposed to bring the country wealth. The Communists were supposed to fade away as the standard of living increased. Now, businessmen in Moscow say, Western companies are laying off 30 to 40 percent of their employees. The government is printing rubles to pay coal miners and teachers who haven't been paid in months.

For a lot of reasons, capitalism is stumbling. According to Russian, American and British businessmen, the reasons are many. For example: * An unworkable and incomprehensible tax system that confiscates 90 percent of corporate profits, taxes corporate losses and takes 60 to 85 percent of personal income.
* No legal system to protect private-property rights unless specifically approved in the Russian Parliament and no system to use property as collateral for loans.

[REDUCED 50% - TO LONG TO POST.]

Offline Elisabeth

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #39 on: October 09, 2004, 12:48:53 PM »
Unfortunately I have to agree with Rskkiya (and for that matter with Orlando Figes): the October Revolution was an inevitable tragedy.

As for pros and cons... It is unquestionable that Lenin and his heirs did achieve certain goals, such as widespread literacy, industrialization, and some class mobility (for those who survived). What is questionable, however, is whether those same goals might not have been achieved more efficiently and, in almost every case, with considerably less bloodshed if they had been carried out by a constitutional monarchy or some other democratically elected government.  And the answer is undoubtedly yes.  Literacy, for example, was already on the rise in tsarist Russia, as was the pace of industrialization.  You had the beginnings of democratic government, a growing middle class and an ever-strengthening  civil society.  

After all, it was not the Bolsheviks who overthrew the autocracy, but this very same new civil society, in large part created by Alexander II’s reforms, and later effectively destroyed by the Bolsheviks, to the permanent detriment of the country.  The extent of the devastation caused by the Soviet regime is still fully in evidence in the Russia of today –  widespread pollution and other environmental damage; a population demographic that seems in permanent decline;  an underdeveloped and weak middle class; an even weaker civil society.  And that’s not to mention all those mass graves, which keep turning up to remind everyone of the bad old days.
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Offline BRITISH_BLUE

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #40 on: October 09, 2004, 12:57:07 PM »
Can we all agree that Russia cannot be Governed, that no Government can carry out the reforms needed, that no matter who you elect he/she will eventually cause some dissatisfaction somewhere and may even be assassinated.

Another thing is no Political System or Party can find the experts needed in so many different fields to push through improvements.  Its quite easy to say lets rebuild the schools, lets tackles the hospitals, lets push forward with further Oil exploration - but money was not available, materials unobtainable, and skilled labour difficutl to obtain, and most workers must have learnt that working for the State is not profitable or a good career choice.

RSSKYIA is correct when she says Socialism was not the best choice, but even the other choices would have resulted in chaos. Chaos i can accept, but not repression and terror and the Cheka and the KGB midnight visits and arrests.

D. I saw the food  queues myself. And my wifes family are from Russia, Russian Jews. I am not Jewish. But this does not make them experts on Russia. To be frank they are indifferent to their Russian Origins. For what its worth Russia is hated in all its [many] surrounding states. Why?

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by BRITISH_BLUE »

Dashkova

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #41 on: October 09, 2004, 01:37:10 PM »
BB wrote:

"D. I saw the food  queues myself. And my wifes family are from Russia, Russian Jews. I am not Jewish. But this does not make them experts on Russia. To be frank they are indifferent to their Russian Origins. For what its worth Russia is hated in all its [many] surrounding states. Why?"

****I never denied the existence of shortages, PLEASE NOTE: *particularly in the two largest cities*. You saw them.  How long did you live in Russia?  Do you think my relatives are lying?  My entire point (which you always seem to miss) is that since many other areas were not similarly afflicted means you cannot make a blanket statement about the ENTIRE Soviet Union.

How strange your relatives are indifferent to their origin.  I have yet to meet a Russian that wasn't quite keen about their traditions, practices, politics, and folkways. And yes, my 81 year old mother-in-law, I do regard her an expert on Russian culture. She is a veritable encyclopedia, as are my sister in law, husband and many other friends and relatives I know.


I have lived in the United States for most of my life and my family has been here since Jamestown.  I know and understand my country and my people in ways no outsider could ever learn in  books.  I am a social historian for the most part, and there is no doubt in my mind that anyone who spent their entire life living in the Soviet Union -- or in any country -- would be an expert on the culture of their country and peoples.

Perhaps the "indifferent" types (surely the minority) did not embrace their culture and society.  That is a tragedy, and I would not be inclined to put much stock in what such people said about their country.

As to why Russia is "hated" by surrounding countries, here is what I can offer:  During the years of the USSR these border countries and/or soviet republics were the recipients of Soviet funding, ranging from the building of infrastructure (where there had been little to none) to cheap food, to health care.  When they cut ties with Russia (which I believe was their right), the latter no longer provided the support to which they had become *exceedingly* accustomed.  Just as the rebel Chechen leader recently expressed: they want Russian rubles and Russian assistance, but they want to be totally autonomous.  
Even you must agree things don't work that way in *this* world.  So, Russia is hated.  There are no doubt many other reasons, but to me, this seems to be the overriding one.

The final thing I would like to say to you is that I hope you have apologized to those you have offended most seriously on this board. some of your recent posts and the underhanded way you treated another member's private message are reprehensible. For someone who constantly touts the aspects of "good breeding" and "station" you have surely demonstrated that you come from rather low orders.

Dashkova

rskkiya

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #42 on: October 09, 2004, 03:51:12 PM »
Quote
Can we all agree that Russia cannot be Governed, that no Government can carry out the reforms needed, that no matter who you elect he/she will eventually cause some dissatisfaction somewhere and may even be assassinated.



 No BB I do not agree that Russia cannot be governed..... The current situation while certainly not perfect seems to be better than no government.
  All nations have dissenters to various "Government policies" both within and without - even in the UK, Europe and America there are people who are dissatisfied with the highly imperfect "system." I  know of no perfect government - we are all simply doing the best that we can ... As I believe that people were during the various Russian Revolutions.
Rskkiya

jeremygaleaz

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #43 on: October 09, 2004, 04:16:28 PM »
I agree R

my question is on the revolution is...

the goal of economic equality, is this really what a person wants? If you spread out money evenly over a population, would you in fact be bringing everyone "Up" or would you be bringing everyone down to the same bare existence level?
I think we are under the impression that only the rich would have to sacrifice, but if money was spread out evenly all over the world, to give an equal amount to (soon to be)  10 billion people, wouldn't, for example, a european living currently below average, be living way above  their means if money was confiscated and handed out again "fairly"?  

So, is the revolutionary goal of economic equality a "pro" or a "con"? I would love to get more opinions on this if there is interest.

And, though I may not agree with all of your views BB, thanks for giving me your opinion.

Jeremy  

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Re: Pros and Cons of the Oct/Nov Revolution
« Reply #44 on: October 09, 2004, 04:24:51 PM »
D: And of course others,

I have met 1000s  of Jews. I live in the middlle of one of Britains largest Russian Jewish Communities.  They place no value whatsoever on their Russian / Polish heritage. They insist that all their alleged ''good qualities'' derive from Jewish Yiddishkiet and the Stetl upbringing their parents or grandparents were raised in. I do not accept this. My views are that they are of Armenian descent, that these  Jews are descendents of Armenians who converted to the Jewish faith, and because they were at some stage nomadic traders they drifted into being virtually [for all pratical purposes] Armenian travellers / Gypsys of the Jewish Faith. Invariably fringe of society dwellers. The only advantage I can trace was their Religious Schools, Cheders.  So in areas in which there was no schools for working  class children - Jewish children were in some respects better educated. This becomes relevant insofar as many of the leading Communists were Jews. Russian Jews. An interesting thought is what might have happpened if  Russia had become Jewish. Say for 100 years Jews were predominately in charge. For various reasons - none good, you can predict what would happen. And the same would happen no matter what group ran the Country.

You need to accept that a great deal of knowledge about Russia is in the public domain. That all authors dig up its unsavoury  past. On British TV every programme on Russia contains this information and  we have had documentarys showing the old Siberian Camps and describing what took place. So lets hope it does not happen again.

To return to Jews, my son looks very Jewish, and he his a PHd 1st in Physics. He was at one time Britiains leading expert on Ships Propellers and propulsion. I mention this because unknown to my son Physics is a Jewish predominant skill. So how come I have from out of nowhere a leading Maths figure in my family? i say its the Russian Personality Influence.

You mention that you would take the word of someone who lived in Russia as the gospel truth, that it carried some wieght with you.  I would rather trust a good author who obtained his/ her information from a variety of sources.  For instance I have spoken to ex Jewish Prisoners who spent 3 month in  Auschwitz - Birkenau who knew absolutely nothing about the place. Their information was worthless. You see they were confined in pens, they were not allowed to roam freely, and the Germans revealed nothing to  them. I spoke to one man who was in Birkenau, not Auschwitz, and he didn't  know it.  

Hitler was convinced that Communism was a Jewish plot at world domination, that Jews were behind the revolution, but thats untrue. What are the forums thoughts on this.

* Because posts need to be short generalisations are needed. I prefer the word synopsis, or snapshot.