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Topic: British subjects in Imperial Russia  (Read 17174 times)
Reply #15
« on: November 12, 2007, 07:15:43 AM »
susannah Offline
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I've checked the Petersburg address book for the year 1913 - sorry, no Hunts there.


Thank you so much for your kindness, Mike. At least it gives me a date to work around. The older generation of Hunts must have died before 1913 and if their daughter married a Russian, she would  have a different name. What is the Petersburg address book? I'm intrigued........
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Reply #16
« on: November 12, 2007, 08:54:31 AM »
Mike Offline
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The address book named "Ves' Peterburg" (All of Petersburg) was published yearly and looks like modern Yellow/White Pages, complete with ads. I have CDs with scanned books for some years, incl. 1913.
The absense of a person from this directory doesn't necessarily mean that he/she didn't live there at that time. Those considered temporary residents, esp. foreigners, were often omitted.
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Reply #17
« on: November 13, 2007, 08:18:30 AM »
susannah Offline
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Thank you again, Mike, for sending such a speedy reply and for increasing my awareness of  resources available to aid my quest. Susannah
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Reply #18
« on: December 01, 2007, 01:10:42 PM »
DaveB Offline
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This is my first posting as a Newbie member of this forum.
I am interested in the activities of my British ancestors in Russia most specifically the WILSON family of St Petersburg.  JAMES WILSON (1750-1821) was a blacksmith who moved from Scotland with his wife and children in 1784.  He was one of the craftsmen who accompanied Charles Cameron.  JOHN WILSON (~1760-~1830) moved his family from Scotland in about 1786.  He was probably one of the metal workers who accompanied Charles Gascoigne.  Over the next 100 years Wilson descendants were quite prominent in St Petersburg, often inter-marrying with citizens of other countries and sometimes with Russian Nobility.  I have collected quite a bit of WILSON information over the past 10 years or so and I would be happy to share what I have found so far.  I am still desperate to find new references to the WILSON family and I hope that forum members will pass along any bits of information which they might discover. I would also be happy to correspond with others who may be working on the British "factory" in Russia.
Dave Burnett, Alberta, Canada
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Reply #19
« on: December 02, 2007, 03:06:13 AM »
Mike Offline
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As of 1913, fifteen Wilsons were listed in the Petersburg address directory, among them a senator, an US embassy secretary, a high-ranking police official, a navy lieutenant and the publisher of a horse-breeding magazine.
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Reply #20
« on: December 02, 2007, 12:45:45 PM »
DaveB Offline
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Thanks Mike!  Another valuable piece of the puzzle.  I am told that the WILSON name does not survive in modern St Petersburg so maybe they were all sent packing during the revolution.
My GG Grandmother Sophia Eleanor Wilson (1815-1876) moved with her children from St Petersburg to England shortly after the death of her husband John Collett in 1850.
Sophia's youngest sister Elizabeth Anna Wilson (b:January 13, 1818) married Alexis Count Vassiliev and apparently died in Moscow in about 1877. Perhaps someone might have information regarding that branch of the family.
 
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Reply #21
« on: April 10, 2008, 11:51:50 AM »
Nadya_Arapov Offline
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As many as wanted to, as far as I can see Lexi though the last probably came out in 1920. 

What an interesting topic! There were a few who remained behind in Russia long after 1920. According to Harvey Pitcher’s book “When Miss Emmie Was In Russia,” at least one governess, Mary Fellows, remained in Russia until her death in 1941. She was found living there by FitzRoy MacLean, a military attaché, in 1937. At the time of her meeting with Mr. MacLean, Mary was still employed as a governess. She had arrived in Russia in 1911. Her own original family, the one she served, was living in 1937 in Tblisi in one room of what used to be their house. Miss Fellows was still with them acting as governess to the son of her former pupil. Loyalty kept her in Russia. “Still very English in her ways – when the Soviet officials tried to persuade her to change her nationality, she just told them not to be so silly…” I would agree with Mr. Pitcher’s contention that there were probably a few others like her who chose to remain in Russia.
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Reply #22
« on: April 21, 2010, 04:17:18 AM »
Constantinople
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That would make a fascinating movie.
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Reply #23
« on: April 23, 2010, 07:35:11 AM »
Kalafrana Offline
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If you can track it down, 'Home on the Neva' by Herbert Swann (father of Donald) is an interesting read. As I remember, he was born about 1890, trained as a doctor, was an army doctor in WW1, then met his wife (who was some kind of nomad from the steppes) during the Civil War, left Russia and settled down in London to practise medicine.

Ann
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Reply #24
« on: November 22, 2010, 07:57:38 PM »
Posco Offline
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I am not sure if this topic is still active but if it is, I would be most great-full for any information on my forebears who although were English, came to New Zealand in 1858 after having been born in Russia. Like many posters to this forum, it has always been a mystery as to what they were doing there.

My great grandfather, William Champion Hide was born in St. Petersburg on 26 September 1885 only a few years before his parents left for New Zealand via England in 1857. We have a certified copy of his baptismal certificate from the Church of the British Factory in St Petersburg. His father, William Richard Hide was also born in St. Petersburg on 30 July, 1829 and he married Agnes Champion in St. Petersburg on 12 June 1853.

It appears they traveled to New Zealand as a result of a long association with George Glenny, also residing in St Petersburg who had been communicating with his nephews who had already come out to New Zealand to look at the possibilities of the new country.  The Hides (Hydes) joined the Glennys in a farming venture on their arrival in New Zealand. The family history is largely known from the time they arrived in New Zealand but it is the time before then that is unknown.

The only clue we have as to what they may have been doing in Russia is a statement by my grand-father that they had something to do with the Russian Mint but what, no-one knows. After coming to new Zealand, the family name changed from Hide to Hyde.

if anyone has records of British subjects in St Ptersburgh or may have family connections with any of the above mentioned  names, I would be most interested. I am sure as one poster has already suggested, a fascinating film could be made on this subject.
Jeff
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Reply #25
« on: November 29, 2011, 06:24:32 PM »
JamesAPrattIII Offline
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The book "Operation Kronstadt' does have a little on the Petrograd british community during the WW I period and the living conditions there during the 1918-19 period. Besides being a rather good spy book. i understand at the start of WW I then St Petersburg also had a 50,000 person German community and Moscow had a 22,000 person German community. I can also say there was a good sized French community in St Petersburg as well. Besides being allies for many years the French had invested rather heavily in Russia pre WW I and were the biggest losers when the Bolos seized power. i hope this is of some help.
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Reply #26
« on: February 17, 2012, 10:01:18 AM »
Rodent Offline
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I am writing a new book about the history of the British in Russia from the 16th century to 1920 and would be happy to hear from anyone who has any information that isn't already on the web sites or who simply wants to discuss the topic.
Thanks
Rod Heather
PS  If anyone is interested, my other books are 'The Iron Tsar' - a biography of the Welsh entrepreneur in Hughesovka (Donetsk) and 'Russia from Red to Black' which is more auto-biographical about working in Russia 20 years ago for the UK Foreign Office.
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Reply #27
« on: March 15, 2013, 11:15:24 AM »
RuthKnight Offline
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This might be a long shot as this post hasn't been posted in for a while but could anyone recommend any books on this subject; I'm doing a dissertation at university on this topic and would like some secondary reading to get me going! Also, anyone familiar with this topic's historiography?
Thank you!
Ruth
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Reply #28
« on: July 21, 2013, 02:31:18 PM »
sascha Offline
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Ruth,

this item is endless, too much is still unknown about (our) British subjects in Imperial Russia.

There are many books with stories about individuals.

But more general:

1) By the bank of the Neva by Anthony Cross, Cambridge 1997

2) St. Petersburg and the British by Anthony Cross, London 2008.

How is your German?:

Britische Migration nach Russland im 19. Jahrhundert , Wiesbaden 2005.

You will see however that besides more general but useful information you will find stories of just a certain class of British persons/families.

So stories of many ordinary British people are still missing. Like mine, with the name Hide.

I`m therefore looking forward to the publication Rodent, reply 26, is preparing. He gave me more details.

I hope this will help you a little bit.

Keep us informed.

sascha
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