Author Topic: British subjects in Imperial Russia  (Read 24695 times)

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Offline sascha

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Re: British subjects in Imperial Russia
« Reply #30 on: September 07, 2016, 05:27:00 PM »
Hi,

interesting information.

One can wonder why he changed his name. May be not very easy to pronounce for russians and the french style sounds good.

I came him across several times however not usefull for my family research.

Thanks anyhow,

sascha

Offline Превед

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Re: British subjects in Imperial Russia
« Reply #31 on: September 08, 2016, 02:59:05 AM »
Charles Gascoigne, mentioned in one of the posts on this forum, was the baptismal name of Charles Baird.  According to Scottish church records, he had his name formally altered in 1792.

One can wonder why he changed his name. May be not very easy to pronounce for russians and the french style sounds good.

According to Wikipedia, the Scottish-Russian engineer and steam boat pioneer Charles Baird was born Gascoigne Baird. His first name was in honour of the owners of his parents tenant farm, the Gascoigne family, whose son, Charles Gascoigne, the industrialist of Carron Ironworks, he accompanied to Russia. He possibly changed his name to avoid confusion with his patron.

I don't think Russians would have huge problems with the name Gascoigne. In Russian it's written (phonetically) as Гаскойн (Gaskoyn) and is quite close to goskoy (several meanings apparantly, one being a grammatical case form of the female name Goska) and Goskino, the acronym of the USSR State Committee for Cinematography.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2016, 03:04:41 AM by Превед »
Березы севера мне милы,
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: Ивы и березы, 1843 / 1856)

Offline IanJ

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Re: British subjects in Imperial Russia
« Reply #32 on: September 12, 2016, 07:50:07 AM »
I made this amendment to Charles Baird's entry in Wikipedia because this forum is not the only place where Charles Gascoigne appears as if he was a different individual, and hoped it might prevent more of those errors. 

I came across the information while checking what was known about the Baird family, because of my academic interest in one of the Handyside family, who were closely related, and found that both the Bairds and the Handysides were quite significant families in nineteenth century Britain as well as in Russia. 

Charles's father was Nicol Baird, who became Surveyor (Chief Engineer) of the Forth and Clyde Navigation. 

Charles Baird persuaded at least three of his sister Margaret's sons (William, Andrew and James Handyside) to join him in St. Petersburg. The first two became famous engineers in Russia and Britain.  James, whose grand-daughter is the focus of my interest, was a medical doctor. 

Two other Handyside brothers, Nicol and Robert, founded the Anchor Line, a shipping company based in Glasgow.  This ran regular sailings to Russia, amongst other places throughout the world, and one of the brothers became the Russian Consul in Scotland.