Author Topic: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar  (Read 5715 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Sarai

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
    • View Profile
[Note: I copy the article in full below because eventually the link may go dead, so at least we have the text for posterity]

From http://www.marinij.com/marin/ci_5060118:

Lib at Large: Shrinky Dink autobiography tells storybook life of Russian prince in Inverness
Paul Liberatore


"If certain historic events had turned out differently - the Bolshevik Revolution, for instance - Andrew Romanoff, a distinguished if unconventional Inverness artist, could have been the emperor of Russia.

Admittedly, that sounds more than a little implausible, but stranger things have happened. And it isn't that hard to picture this dignified, remarkably youthful, mustachioed octogenarian - regal even in blue jeans and a fleece vest, an ever-present scarf worn dashingly around his neck - as a royal personage, even a Russian czar.

Given a choice, there are probably some people who would prefer him over Vladimir Putin, but that's neither here nor there.

Romanoff, who celebrated his 84th birthday Sunday, is the grandnephew of Russia's last czar, the ill-fated Nicholas II, who was executed in 1918 by the Bolsheviks along with his wife, Alexandra, and their children.

The rest of the Romanoff family was rescued from Russia by King George V of England, who invited them to live in a 23-room "cottage" on the grounds of Windsor Castle.

Although he's of royal Russian blood, Andrew was born in 1923 in London and spent an idyllic, if oddly insular, childhood behind the castle gates.

"It was a strange atmosphere," he recalls over lunch in the sunny kitchen of the 1906 Victorian in Inverness where he lives with his wife, the artist Inez Storer. "I didn't know who the hell I was."

In a new autobiography, "The Boy Who Would Be Tsar: The Art of Prince Andrew Romanoff," he paints a pretty picture of his boyhood.

"The Windsor grounds made for a fantastic playground, with vast lawns, curving paths along the River Thames, fish ponds, polo fields, greenhouses full of exotic plants," he writes.

The book is an enchanting volume illustrated with Romanoff's whimsical folk art, miniature drawings done in a medium originally intended as a children's toy, a material called "Shrinky Dinks." He paints on plastic sheets that shrink when baked in an oven.

Earlier this month, he was feted at a reception at Gallery 16 in San Francisco, where his book, his drawings and paintings will be on exhibit through Feb. 24. Published by Urban Digital Color, the book is available through www.gallery16.com

"We had people calling us all week before the opening, saying, 'Oh, what a great story. Is it actually true?'" says Vanessa Blaikie, assistant gallery director. "I told them, 'Absolutely, the whole thing.' It's just so fantastical to imagine that this is somebody's life."

One of those people whom everyone in West Marin, it seems, has something nice to say about, Romanoff and his wife have lived for four decades in their wood-shingled, three-story, century-old home at the end of a verdant lane.

As his book makes clear, he settled there at the end of a rather remarkable journey.

Educated at the military Imperial Service College, he served in the British Navy during World War II. After the war, he worked briefly on a farm in Kent, "the garden of England," before sailing to the United States in 1949 aboard a freighter with some other thoroughbreds - horses bound for the Kentucky Derby.

In 1970, the height of Marin's hippie migration, he came to Inverness to work as a carpenter, building houses with a Russian cousin.

But more people know him for a more countercultural venture: as the owner of a West Marin company that manufactured jewelry and "smoking paraphernalia."

"People get absorbed in the preposterous nature of his story, the arc of his life," says Gallery 16 owner Griff Williams, an old friend who encouraged him to write the book. "And it is an amazing tale. You don't go from being royalty to selling hash pipes in Bolinas and have people believe it."

(continued below due to space restrictions)
« Last Edit: January 22, 2007, 09:50:44 AM by Sarai »

Offline Sarai

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
    • View Profile
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2007, 09:47:13 AM »
(continuation):

"But, in all the amazement over Romanoff's background, it's easy to overlook the captivating quality of his "outsider art," a term used to describe so-called naive artists who work on the margins of the mainstream art world, often using unusual materials and techniques. To the best of anyone's knowledge, there is no one else, save perhaps a generation of school kids, creating art with Shrinky Dinks.

"His work is an object lesson for young artists," Williams says. "He's so true to himself. He's so willing to let people in on even the most embarrassing moments of his life.

"We have one piece in our show, for example, that's called, 'A Romantic Way to Spend an Evening.' It's an image of a guy, whom you presume to be Andrew, digging through the trash for Viagra. And then there's this little annotation on the bottom of the drawing that says, 'Later that evening, he found one in the bottom of his drawer.'"

An American citizen since 1956, Romanoff dropped his royal title, His Serene Highness Andrew Romanoff, when he came to the United States. Good thing. It isn't the kind of moniker that would go over very well at the Old Western Saloon on a Saturday night.

But ask anyone in town who knows him, and they'll tell you that he's a prince of a man. Quiet, modest to the point of seeming shy, he speaks in an indistinguishable accent that comes from growing up in London, speaking only Russian at home and then moving to one of the more hip outposts in America.

He is a distant relative of Prince Charles, but he was in Hawaii when Charles visited West Marin last year, so the two didn't meet. Romanoff doesn't act as if he missed anything.

"We have royalty in our neighborhood, but he doesn't act in any way like royalty," says Steve Costa, owner of Point Reyes Books, where Romanoff will appear for a reading at 5 p.m. Feb. 11. "Andrew is such a down-to-earth fellow. He has this presence about him that's pretty wonderful."

While he has led a storybook life, it is not without its tragedies. In 1940, when he was 16 and away at school, his mother, a stylish 53-year-old beauty with green eyes, alabaster skin and red hair, was killed when a Nazi bomb exploded near her family's home. She was crushed when a ceiling beam fell on her.

In his book, Romanoff includes a drawing titled, "My Mother's Death," showing him praying over her coffin.

Perhaps even more emotionally devastating, his first wife, Kathleen, unexpectedly died in 1967 from a virulent flu virus. She was just 33, leaving him a widower with two small sons.

"You've never really gotten over that, have you, Andrew?" his wife asks him compassionately.

"No," he agrees, casting his eyes down, "I never have."

When he and his boys moved into Storer's big Inverness house, he also brought with him a 22-year-old baby-sitter, a dog and a rat. She already had four young children by a previous marriage to former county supervisor Tom Storer.

Sitting over lunch at their dining room table, they look back fondly, if realistically, on those early days of their extended family, a kind of "Cheaper by the Dozen" scenario that wasn't always as comedic and romantic as the movie.

"We were the Brady Bunch," Romanoff says of their instant brood of six kids, ages 6, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15. "Luckily, Inez had this beautiful house with 14 rooms."

"I think that's how we survived," she chimes in. "It was an experience in living. We did it, but it was pretty hard. If you thought about it, you wouldn't do it. But somehow we survived."

After three decades together, they remain a handsome couple, admired in the community as an example of a successful marriage and artistic partnership.

She was already an established artist when she encouraged him to express himself through his drawings, despite his lack of training.

"I owe it all to her," he says.

And, over the years, his fanciful pieces have become more than just a hobby, a curiosity, a novelty.

"People love his work," says Bolinas artist Vickisa Feinberg, publicist for Gallery Route One in Point Reyes Station, where Romanoff's drawings will be on display in the gallery annex from Feb. 9 through March 18.

"His work is very much in demand," she says. "I think it's because his art is extremely entertaining, reflecting his youthful take on life.

"We could all learn a lot from Andrew Romanoff. 'Emulate Andrew' - that's my new motto."

Offline Sarai

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
    • View Profile
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2007, 09:56:38 AM »
He is a grandson of Grand Duchess Xenia, the child of her first son Andrei.

Offline Eurohistory

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1920
    • View Profile
    • Eurohistory.com
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2007, 11:42:18 AM »
I missed your posting completely!

Arturo Beéche
--
Arturo Beéche, Publisher
http://erhj.blogspot.com
European Royal History Journal
Kensington House Books
6300 Kensington Ave.
East Richmond Heights, CA 94805 USA
510/236-1730
books@eurohistory.com
http://www.eurohistory.com

Offline Marlene

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2466
  • I live and breath QVD
    • View Profile
    • Royal Musings
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2007, 08:57:34 PM »
I don't mean to be a spoilsport here, but did you get permission from the copyright holder, ie the newspaper, to reprint the entire article fulltext.  This is a major copyright violation, Sarai.  Perhaps you could ask the newspaper for permission to quote the entire article ... you do need their permission.

[Note: I copy the article in full below because eventually the link may go dead, so at least we have the text for posterity]

From http://www.marinij.com/marin/ci_5060118:

Lib at Large: Shrinky Dink autobiography tells storybook life of Russian prince in Inverness
Paul Liberatore


"If certain historic events had turned out differently - the Bolshevik Revolution, for instance - Andrew Romanoff, a distinguished if unconventional Inverness artist, could have been the emperor of Russia.

Admittedly, that sounds more than a little implausible, but stranger things have happened. And it isn't that hard to picture this dignified, remarkably youthful, mustachioed octogenarian - regal even in blue jeans and a fleece vest, an ever-present scarf worn dashingly around his neck - as a royal personage, even a Russian czar.

Given a choice, there are probably some people who would prefer him over Vladimir Putin, but that's neither here nor there.

Romanoff, who celebrated his 84th birthday Sunday, is the grandnephew of Russia's last czar, the ill-fated Nicholas II, who was executed in 1918 by the Bolsheviks along with his wife, Alexandra, and their children.

The rest of the Romanoff family was rescued from Russia by King George V of England, who invited them to live in a 23-room "cottage" on the grounds of Windsor Castle.

Although he's of royal Russian blood, Andrew was born in 1923 in London and spent an idyllic, if oddly insular, childhood behind the castle gates.

"It was a strange atmosphere," he recalls over lunch in the sunny kitchen of the 1906 Victorian in Inverness where he lives with his wife, the artist Inez Storer. "I didn't know who the hell I was."

In a new autobiography, "The Boy Who Would Be Tsar: The Art of Prince Andrew Romanoff," he paints a pretty picture of his boyhood.

"The Windsor grounds made for a fantastic playground, with vast lawns, curving paths along the River Thames, fish ponds, polo fields, greenhouses full of exotic plants," he writes.

The book is an enchanting volume illustrated with Romanoff's whimsical folk art, miniature drawings done in a medium originally intended as a children's toy, a material called "Shrinky Dinks." He paints on plastic sheets that shrink when baked in an oven.

Earlier this month, he was feted at a reception at Gallery 16 in San Francisco, where his book, his drawings and paintings will be on exhibit through Feb. 24. Published by Urban Digital Color, the book is available through www.gallery16.com

"We had people calling us all week before the opening, saying, 'Oh, what a great story. Is it actually true?'" says Vanessa Blaikie, assistant gallery director. "I told them, 'Absolutely, the whole thing.' It's just so fantastical to imagine that this is somebody's life."

One of those people whom everyone in West Marin, it seems, has something nice to say about, Romanoff and his wife have lived for four decades in their wood-shingled, three-story, century-old home at the end of a verdant lane.

As his book makes clear, he settled there at the end of a rather remarkable journey.

Educated at the military Imperial Service College, he served in the British Navy during World War II. After the war, he worked briefly on a farm in Kent, "the garden of England," before sailing to the United States in 1949 aboard a freighter with some other thoroughbreds - horses bound for the Kentucky Derby.

In 1970, the height of Marin's hippie migration, he came to Inverness to work as a carpenter, building houses with a Russian cousin.

But more people know him for a more countercultural venture: as the owner of a West Marin company that manufactured jewelry and "smoking paraphernalia."

"People get absorbed in the preposterous nature of his story, the arc of his life," says Gallery 16 owner Griff Williams, an old friend who encouraged him to write the book. "And it is an amazing tale. You don't go from being royalty to selling hash pipes in Bolinas and have people believe it."

(continued below due to space restrictions)
Author of Queen Victoria's Descendants,
& publisher of Royal Book News.
Visit my blog, Royal Musings  http://royalmusingsblogspotcom.blogspot.com/

Offline Sarai

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
    • View Profile
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2007, 09:38:16 AM »
Marlene,
I was honestly unaware that I needed their permission to copy and paste the article here. I thought that since I did provide the link to the article, referenced the writer, and did not claim the article as my own, that it was okay. Such as when one is writing a report for school and quotes an entire passage in the report, as far as I have been taught it's not copyright violation as long as you reference the source material, the author, etc. such as in a "works cited" page. I pasted the article here because after months or years the link may go dead and then we are left with no information that could be of use in the future to someone. I am not as knowledgeable as you are about copyright laws and I do apologize for my ignorance. I know ignorance is no excuse to some, but it's all I've got in this matter. Next time I will just reference the link and not copy the article, and if the knowledge is lost to posterity then so be it. If I could remove the post I would and leave only the link, but I find I can't modify my post, perhaps because it's older.

I don't mean to be a spoilsport here, but did you get permission from the copyright holder, ie the newspaper, to reprint the entire article fulltext.  This is a major copyright violation, Sarai.  Perhaps you could ask the newspaper for permission to quote the entire article ... you do need their permission.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2007, 10:04:58 AM by Sarai »

Offline ChristineM

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2882
    • View Profile
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2007, 04:40:08 PM »
Sarai - I'm sure the Marin Independent Journal would be very happy to know that you have refererenced their article on Prince Andrei on this fine forum.   As you stated - you, quite correctly, provided a link to the newspaper, you credited the author, and you are not copying this with any intent to claim anything - either credit or financially.   In fact the Marin Independent Journal have received some valuable free advertising.   I had never heard of the Marin Independent Journal.  Most likely there are other people here who have not either.   Like others who advertise their wares, at no cost, on this Forum, they probably could find it advantageous.   They would be delighted with the possibility of an increase in readership.   You have led posters to an invaluable resource and it has not cost the Marin Independent Journal one single penny.

If you look through the Forum, you will find links to, and articles copied by, many posters, as well as by management.   Following Marlene's Vigilance a major amount of information would disappear from many threads.   Newspapers and journals which - as you have done - have been attributed and authors credited, will find it tedius in the extreme when all the well-intentioned, not-for-profit posters here follow Marlene's Vigilance.

I must thank you, Sarai.   I was very interested to read the article.   The cousin to which Prince Andrei Andreivich refers, the late Alexander Vickers, was a friend of ours.   His half-sister, Princess Olga Andreiovna Romanov, is also a friend of many years.

tsaria

Offline Marlene

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2466
  • I live and breath QVD
    • View Profile
    • Royal Musings
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2007, 05:03:30 PM »
You are allowed to provide a link.  But you are not permitted, under US law (as well as the law of other countries) to post full text articles without permission.  You need to get permission because it is not your article.
Marlene,
I was honestly unaware that I needed their permission to copy and paste the article here. I thought that since I did provide the link to the article, referenced the writer, and did not claim the article as my own, that it was okay. Such as when one is writing a report for school and quotes an entire passage in the report, as far as I have been taught it's not copyright violation as long as you reference the source material, the author, etc. such as in a "works cited" page. I pasted the article here because after months or years the link may go dead and then we are left with no information that could be of use in the future to someone. I am not as knowledgeable as you are about copyright laws and I do apologize for my ignorance. I know ignorance is no excuse to some, but it's all I've got in this matter. Next time I will just reference the link and not copy the article, and if the knowledge is lost to posterity then so be it. If I could remove the post I would and leave only the link, but I find I can't modify my post, perhaps because it's older.

I don't mean to be a spoilsport here, but did you get permission from the copyright holder, ie the newspaper, to reprint the entire article fulltext.  This is a major copyright violation, Sarai.  Perhaps you could ask the newspaper for permission to quote the entire article ... you do need their permission.
Author of Queen Victoria's Descendants,
& publisher of Royal Book News.
Visit my blog, Royal Musings  http://royalmusingsblogspotcom.blogspot.com/

Offline Belochka

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 4437
  • City of Peter stand in all your splendor - Pushkin
    • View Profile
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2007, 05:16:19 PM »
Sarai - I'm sure the Marin Independent Journal would be very happy to know that you have refererenced their article on Prince Andrei on this fine forum.   As you stated - you, quite correctly, provided a link to the newspaper, you credited the author, and you are not copying this with any intent to claim anything - either credit or financially.   In fact the Marin Independent Journal have received some valuable free advertising.   I had never heard of the Marin Independent Journal.  Most likely there are other people here who have not either.   Like others who advertise their wares, at no cost, on this Forum, they probably could find it advantageous.   They would be delighted with the possibility of an increase in readership.   You have led posters to an invaluable resource and it has not cost the Marin Independent Journal one single penny.

If you look through the Forum, you will find links to, and articles copied by, many posters, as well as by management.   Following Marlene's Vigilance a major amount of information would disappear from many threads.   Newspapers and journals which - as you have done - have been attributed and authors credited, will find it tedius in the extreme when all the well-intentioned, not-for-profit posters here follow Marlene's Vigilance.

I must thank you, Sarai.   I was very interested to read the article.   The cousin to which Prince Andrei Andreivich refers, the late Alexander Vickers, was a friend of ours.   His half-sister, Princess Olga Andreiovna Romanov, is also a friend of many years.

tsaria

I would also like to express my gratitude to Sarai and agree with Tsaria's thoughts. Both the article and the accompanying photographs were fascinating.

Thank you for sharing.

Margarita
:)


Faces of Russia is now on Facebook!


http://www.searchfoundationinc.org/

Offline Marlene

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2466
  • I live and breath QVD
    • View Profile
    • Royal Musings
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2007, 05:18:28 PM »
Tsaria,

It is not the link that is the problem. That's allowed under the law.  But posting the entire article is illegal and violates international copyright law.   Yes, indeed, the paper has possibly lost money because it probably sells the rights to their stories for reprint --and papers charge for this, usually.  Same for their photos. They might allow the reposting of an article for free - but one needs to ask first.  Do you walk into a store, and select a sweater, walk out and not pay for it .. well, of course not.  It is the same thing for other peoples' works.  Sarai may not realize it, but she republished someone else's work without their permission.  If someone can take the time to post something that it is not theirs,  someone can take the time to get permission to post it ... and the publisher may not allow it.  They also may charge for it ...

It is called respect for other peoples' works - whether written or images.   It is the law ... and you and I live in law-abiding societies. All Sarai had to do was include a link and an abstract.  That's allowed.  I am sure, Tsaria, that you would prefer people to abide by the law of the land.   It can take only one publisher to bring down a message board.  Just one.

And - it takes only a few minutes to send an email, write a letter, make a phone call.

Here is the email address for the newspaper's legal department:   legals@marinij.com

It would be super if posters here would show respect for other peoples' works by asking for permission - and then accepting if a paper says no .. or wants to charge for the reprint.  It is not difficult to do.   Copyright is not about money.  It is about the protection of intellectual property.  

It is not my vigiliance. It is the law. The US and the UK and just about every country in the world - has intellectual property laws to protect writers, artists, photographers, musicians and so on.  If I can take the time to do it ... so can everyone else.  It's easy to do ... or just provide a link.  As I said ... just one  publisher can close down a message board for copyright violations.
Sarai - I'm sure the Marin Independent Journal would be very happy to know that you have refererenced their article on Prince Andrei on this fine forum.   As you stated - you, quite correctly, provided a link to the newspaper, you credited the author, and you are not copying this with any intent to claim anything - either credit or financially.   In fact the Marin Independent Journal have received some valuable free advertising.   I had never heard of the Marin Independent Journal.  Most likely there are other people here who have not either.   Like others who advertise their wares, at no cost, on this Forum, they probably could find it advantageous.   They would be delighted with the possibility of an increase in readership.   You have led posters to an invaluable resource and it has not cost the Marin Independent Journal one single penny.

If you look through the Forum, you will find links to, and articles copied by, many posters, as well as by management.   Following Marlene's Vigilance a major amount of information would disappear from many threads.   Newspapers and journals which - as you have done - have been attributed and authors credited, will find it tedius in the extreme when all the well-intentioned, not-for-profit posters here follow Marlene's Vigilance.

I must thank you, Sarai.   I was very interested to read the article.   The cousin to which Prince Andrei Andreivich refers, the late Alexander Vickers, was a friend of ours.   His half-sister, Princess Olga Andreiovna Romanov, is also a friend of many years.

tsaria
Author of Queen Victoria's Descendants,
& publisher of Royal Book News.
Visit my blog, Royal Musings  http://royalmusingsblogspotcom.blogspot.com/

Offline ChristineM

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2882
    • View Profile
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2007, 04:44:09 AM »
Then, why did YOU re-copy it Marlene?   I suppose you contacted Marlin Independent Journal beforehand.

Why did you pick on Sarai's post?   Was it the mood you were in when you clicked on the 'News' thread?   The violation you so diligently, or rather not so diligently, pursue goes on all over this Forum as well as many such Forum across the entire internet.

Mia culpa - I have copied articles as well as give links and attributions.    You did not 'spoil my sport'.   

There is the law and there is the 'spirit of the law'.   Since FA is a lawyer, I'm sure he maintains a legal-eagle eye on what goes on in the Forum.   If every law of every land was to be interpreted as keenly as you instruct, Marlene, entire nations would sieze up with inertia.

Since you seem to believe you are the custodian of the uses of copyright and intellectual copyright on behalf of all fellow authors and artists, I can see a whole new career beckoning.   There's an enormous amount of work out there.   You will probably have to hire staff.

tsariia

PS:  Thanks to Sarai's post, I not only propose buying Prince Andrei Andreivich's book, but also making contact with him.   We share a number of mutual friends.   His late cousin and his wife, Alexander and Patience Vickers, were an extremely colourful couple both of whom, tragically, died young.   It was Alexander who told me that his family had, on behalf of the British authorities, laid on a submarine (Vickers) to go to Romanov-na-Murmane (Murmansk), in an endeavour to evacuate Nicholas, Alexandra and their family (their cousins).

   

Offline Forum Admin

  • Administrator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 4643
  • www.alexanderpalace.org
    • View Profile
    • Alexander Palace Time Machine
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2007, 09:12:35 AM »
OK,

The article was posted free of charge on the Marin Journal's website, it was fully cited, there was no attempt to appropriate it for personal gain, and it was re-published here for purely educational purposes.

I will support and side with Sarai on this one, as there is no damage to the copyright holder by the reproduction (they gave it away free in the first place, so there is no loss to them from it being repeated here AND they were given full credit).  There was no use of it for personal gain by Sarai, nor our Forum, and rather it falls under both the fair use of Review of a work AND educational purposes, IMO.

If the Marin Journal wishes it removed, they may contact me directly and I will do so immediately upon their request. That said, this issue is closed to public discussion.

We thank Marlene for her concerns for keeping this Forum and its users within the boundaries of US law, and we thank Sarai for bringing this to our attention.

As an aside to Tsaria, Bob has been well aquainted with Andrew Romanov for over 20 years, in fact, Andrew went to Russia with Bob on one trip.  Andrew himself, I am certain, would have no qualms about this being put out on our Forum as well.

FA

Offline LisaDavidson

  • Moderator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 2650
    • View Profile
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #12 on: March 26, 2007, 11:44:17 PM »
I think Andrew would get a kick out of all this fuss over him.

He's a very modest man, with a very wicked sense of humor.

One of my favorite memories of Andrei Andreivich is of walking down the street in San Francisco after dinner one night about 12 years agoi, talking a mile a minute in various languages all at once, and having someone stop us and ask "what language are you speaking?". We said, nearly in unison: "Romanish! We are speaking Romanish!". It's whatever word or phrase in whatever language best evokes an idea best.

This dear man was raised with HM Queen Elizabeth II and I can't believe he's in his 80's! Andrei is very young at heart.

Offline allanraymond

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 140
    • View Profile
    • Monarchies of Europe
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2017, 06:39:32 PM »
I've just come across this topic and notice in the article it mentions                                                             

"Perhaps even more emotionally devastating, his first wife, Kathleen, unexpectedly died in 1967 from a virulent flu virus. She was just 33, leaving him a widower with two small sons."

Wasn't Kathleen his second wife, his first wife being Elena Konstantinovna Dourneva?

Offline JGP

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • View Profile
Re: New autobiography by Andrew Romanov, artist and grandnephew of Tsar
« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2017, 10:57:11 PM »
I've just come across this topic and notice in the article it mentions                                                             

"Perhaps even more emotionally devastating, his first wife, Kathleen, unexpectedly died in 1967 from a virulent flu virus. She was just 33, leaving him a widower with two small sons."

Wasn't Kathleen his second wife, his first wife being Elena Konstantinovna Dourneva?

Yes indeed!  Prince Andrew has been married three times. He was married first in San Francisco on 9 September 1951 to Elena Dourneva (1927—1992). They had one son before divorcing in 1959.

Prince Alexis Andreevich Romanov (born 27 April 1953)

He was married secondly to Kathleen Norris (1935–1967) whom he married on 21 March 1961 in San Francisco. They had two children. Kathleen Norris was a granddaughter of American authors Kathleen Norris and Charles Gilman Norris.

Prince Peter Andreevich Romanov (born 21 November 1961)
Prince Andrew Romanov Jr. (born 20 February 1963)

He is presently married to Inez von Bachelin (born 1933).