Author Topic: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children  (Read 5646 times)

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Offline Suzanne

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Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« on: January 25, 2007, 07:49:27 PM »
I noticed in Charlotte Zeepvat's work "Romanov Autumn", in the chapter "The Lost Tsar" about Alexei that she states regarding the Imperial Family's move to Tobolsk, (I'm paraphrasing here) "It is said that Kerensky would have allowed the five children to join their grandmother in the Crimea but they would not hear of leaving their parents." - There didn't seem to be a footnote for this - Does anyone know where Zeepvat got her information on this? Did Kerensky present the children with a choice about accompanying their parents their Tobolsk or was it simply assumed that they would do so?

Offline imperial angel

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2007, 11:01:06 AM »
I have never read that book in question, but I have to admit that I have never heard of this. It is possible, but it seems more like rumor to me than anything else. I would think it was simply assumed that they would accompany them to Tobolsk, especially Alexei. But, most obviously, Nicholas and Alexandra would have wanted their children to be with them anyway.

Offline azrael7171918

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2007, 05:53:11 PM »
I noticed in Charlotte Zeepvat's work "Romanov Autumn", in the chapter "The Lost Tsar" about Alexei that she states regarding the Imperial Family's move to Tobolsk, (I'm paraphrasing here) "It is said that Kerensky would have allowed the five children to join their grandmother in the Crimea but they would not hear of leaving their parents." - There didn't seem to be a footnote for this - Does anyone know where Zeepvat got her information on this? Did Kerensky present the children with a choice about accompanying their parents their Tobolsk or was it simply assumed that they would do so?

I remember reading years ago (pre discovery of bodies) that the girls had been offered their freedom and they turned it down. I believe the reason was they were of an age where they could legally make their own decision on that matter.

Azrael

Offline Sarushka

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2007, 04:44:58 PM »
It's my understanding that the children (including Aleksei) were never really considered political prisoners by the provisional government. In theory, they were free to leave, but were understandably unwilling to be separated from their parents.
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Offline Baby Tsarevich

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2007, 06:06:08 PM »
That's the first time I've heard this. If they weren't considered as prisoners, then why were the children under constant watch in both the Governor's and Ipatieve's House?

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Offline Sarushka

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2007, 07:38:25 PM »
If they weren't considered as prisoners, then why were the children under constant watch in both the Governor's and Ipatieve's House?

Well, considering that the tsar and tsarina were definitely prisoners, and OTMAA chose to stay with their parents, they really didn't have much choice. In such close quarters, there wasn't any way to watch Nicholas and Alexandra but not the children.

Also, I know Kerensky (and by extension, the provisional government) didn't consider the children prisoners, but Kerensky was in power for a relatively short time. The new government may have felt differently about the children's status.
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Offline Suzanne

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2007, 09:33:18 PM »
Apparently, in Tobolsk, Colonel Kobylinsky wanted to give OTMA the same freedoms as the Imperial suite - permission to take walks around the town, etc, but his men objected and the Imperial children remained confined to the Governor's mansion

Offline lori_c

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2007, 08:56:50 AM »
That's the first time I've heard this. If they weren't considered as prisoners, then why were the children under constant watch in both the Governor's and Ipatieve's House?

-Anya
I think anybody who agreed to stay w/the Tsar and Tsarina knew they would be considered prisoners.  As in the case of the retainers who refused to leave the IF even on to Ekaterinburg. 

Offline imperial angel

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2007, 09:49:50 AM »
For the children, they never would have chosen otherwise. Alexei obviously needed to be with this parents, and that was partly why Nicholas abdicated, so that he could have his son with him. Anastasia was still kind of young. The other sisters would never have thought of leaving, I am sure that it never crossed their minds. One question, did the children know of this?  I would think Kerensky would have been laxer about this than the Bolsheviks, that makes sense.

Offline Sarushka

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2007, 11:09:43 AM »
I believe the children did know.
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Offline Suzanne

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2007, 06:24:28 PM »
And I have read that Kerensky publicly stated that Nicholas and Alexandra were moved under guard to Tobolsk and that their children and servants accompanied them voluntarily. This statement indicates that the children/servants were offered the possibility of not coming along to Tobolsk.

Offline etonexile

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Re: Kerensky's Offer to the Imperial Children
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2007, 06:53:26 PM »
For children to be "allowed" to accompany their parents would seem a fine point. Few children of whatever age would likely vote to be seperated in a time of adversity.