Author Topic: Olga photographs II  (Read 124073 times)

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Offline Holly

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #135 on: July 12, 2007, 07:35:03 AM »
Yes, it looks like it's just bright in those areas. In both places there's a window directly behind it.
I especially like Olga in that picture. Is it just me or does she always have a kind of wistful look on her face in photographs she's posing for?
"Господь им дал дар по молитвам их размягчать окаменелые наши сердца за их страдания..Мне думается, что если люди будут молиться Царской Cемье, оттают сердца с Божией помощью."

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Olishka~ Pincess

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #136 on: July 12, 2007, 09:54:29 AM »
Yes, it looks like it's just bright in those areas. In both places there's a window directly behind it.
I especially like Olga in that picture. Is it just me or does she always have a kind of wistful look on her face in photographs she's posing for?
I think it is the way the photo came out back then the photos were not clear and came out neat as they do now. Olga does has a sad and simple look on her. The photos make it seem as if Olga and Tatiana were not to happy. Tatiana has a ghostly face she is looking directly at the camra and her hair is different style too. She normaly has her hair like Olga's but she is wearing it completly out.

Offline Holly

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #137 on: July 12, 2007, 11:51:16 AM »
That's because the picture was taken in the morning, I think. They hadn't yet changed out of their nightgowns or fixed their hair yet. Notice that Olga's hair looks rather disheveld.
"Господь им дал дар по молитвам их размягчать окаменелые наши сердца за их страдания..Мне думается, что если люди будут молиться Царской Cемье, оттают сердца с Божией помощью."

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Olishka~ Pincess

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #138 on: July 12, 2007, 12:57:06 PM »
In some of the photos the girls hair looks straight and in some it looks curly. They must have had their hair straighten with a hot comb. The girls did have think hair. Their cousin Elizabeth of Hesse had realy think hair it was in her pictures many of them.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2007, 12:58:58 PM by Elizabeth~Princess »

Offline Holly

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #139 on: July 12, 2007, 01:40:25 PM »
It wasn't too thick. It's just wavy and that makes it look bigger. Maria had the most natural curl. When it was short after growing out from being bald, her's was curly and the other girls were jealous of it. Anastasia had thinner hair and it was rather straight as Pierre Gilliard once said in his memoirs, "it lay flat on her forehead".
"Господь им дал дар по молитвам их размягчать окаменелые наши сердца за их страдания..Мне думается, что если люди будут молиться Царской Cемье, оттают сердца с Божией помощью."

http://www.otmaa.org -- Coming Soon.

Offline Sarushka

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #140 on: July 13, 2007, 12:17:14 AM »
Remember that moving while a photo was taken in those days meant the image blurred.

By the turn of the century, snapshot cameras were both common and affordable, so in general there was no need to stand perfectly still to have a clear picture taken. The shutter speeds of even early model Kodak Brownie cameras (the models the IF used) were comperable to todays point-and-shoots. However, because there was no flash, low light often created problems with bluriness if the subject moved. But that's hardly the fault of the technology of the day -- it happens to me all the time when I forget to pop open the flash, even on my modern Kodak digital model.
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Offline Raegan

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #141 on: July 14, 2007, 01:50:38 PM »
By the turn of the century, snapshot cameras were both common and affordable, so in general there was no need to stand perfectly still to have a clear picture taken. The shutter speeds of even early model Kodak Brownie cameras (the models the IF used) were comperable to todays point-and-shoots. However, because there was no flash, low light often created problems with bluriness if the subject moved. But that's hardly the fault of the technology of the day -- it happens to me all the time when I forget to pop open the flash, even on my modern Kodak digital model.

Interesting information! Just out of curiosity, where the snapshot cameras produced at the turn of the century the same as the ones around when N&A were growing up? Or did they have to stand perfectly still when being photographed as children?

Offline Sarushka

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #142 on: July 14, 2007, 07:32:25 PM »
By the turn of the century, snapshot cameras were both common and affordable, so in general there was no need to stand perfectly still to have a clear picture taken. The shutter speeds of even early model Kodak Brownie cameras (the models the IF used) were comperable to todays point-and-shoots. However, because there was no flash, low light often created problems with bluriness if the subject moved. But that's hardly the fault of the technology of the day -- it happens to me all the time when I forget to pop open the flash, even on my modern Kodak digital model.

Interesting information! Just out of curiosity, where the snapshot cameras produced at the turn of the century the same as the ones around when N&A were growing up? Or did they have to stand perfectly still when being photographed as children?

Kodak's Brownie camera debuted in 1900, so the family of AIII must have used different equipment for their photos. I'm sorry I don't know much about photography before the Brownie models, so I can't say at what point professional portrait cameras became more subject-friendly.

For more info on the cameras NAOTMAA used themselves, here's a very good site all about the Brownie:
http://www.brownie-camera.com/
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world." ~Greg King

Offline grandduchess_42

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #143 on: July 16, 2007, 10:30:54 AM »
So keep me awake for every moment
Give us more time to be this way
We can't stay like this forever
But I can have you next to me today
. Josh Groban .

Offline Raegan

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #144 on: July 16, 2007, 12:01:50 PM »
lots of women

I don't believe I have ever seen that picture before. What book is it from?

BTW, thanks for the link Sarushka. :)
« Last Edit: July 16, 2007, 12:04:15 PM by Raegan »

Offline Lanie

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #145 on: July 17, 2007, 02:45:03 AM »
It's my scan, it's from Larisa Ermilova's The Last Tsar.  Lots of military-type photos in there.

Offline Sarushka

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #146 on: July 17, 2007, 07:32:39 AM »
The caption is something like "Olga and the women of her regiment" so I'm guessing they're the Hussar officers' wives.
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
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Offline clockworkgirl21

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #147 on: July 22, 2007, 08:57:26 PM »


Offline Annie

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #148 on: July 25, 2007, 01:31:45 PM »
By the turn of the century, snapshot cameras were both common and affordable, so in general there was no need to stand perfectly still to have a clear picture taken. The shutter speeds of even early model Kodak Brownie cameras (the models the IF used) were comperable to todays point-and-shoots. However, because there was no flash, low light often created problems with bluriness if the subject moved. But that's hardly the fault of the technology of the day -- it happens to me all the time when I forget to pop open the flash, even on my modern Kodak digital model.

Interesting information! Just out of curiosity, where the snapshot cameras produced at the turn of the century the same as the ones around when N&A were growing up? Or did they have to stand perfectly still when being photographed as children?

Kodak's Brownie camera debuted in 1900, so the family of AIII must have used different equipment for their photos. I'm sorry I don't know much about photography before the Brownie models, so I can't say at what point professional portrait cameras became more subject-friendly.

For more info on the cameras NAOTMAA used themselves, here's a very good site all about the Brownie:
http://www.brownie-camera.com/

I had a Brownie camera when I was a kid, it was already old fashioned by then. It took black and white film and you had to install it on a roll in the closet so no light would hit it. You wore it around your neck.  There was a metal thing on top you pulled up and looked down inside of this big thick glass lens to get the view you wanted of the picture you were taking,then you clicked it.

Before the early 1900's people did have to sit perfectly still. But you also have to for some digital cameras now, so while technology moves on, it also goes backward. Maybe someday all digitals won't be this way.

One more thing on old cameras. My grandmother was exactly the same age as Anastasia, within days. When she was 17, she won a camera on a punch card came. It was one of those foldout kinds that looks like a bellows. It took size 620 film (my Brownie took 127). The kind of camera she had was stil basically used for decades, though the bellows part was phased out over time. My Dad had one of those old cameras and you had to attach a big blinding light to the top, and later there were big flash bulbs.

The 'instamatic' cameras didn't come along until the early 1970's. I remember my first one, a size 126 cartridge. How nice it was not to have to load a roll in the closet anymore. They had the square flash cubes on top that turned as the picture clicked so you could get a good side for your next shot. They sort of melted on the outside and got really hot after they'd been used. Then some cameras had strip flashes where you could get more shots.

As far as I can remember, it was the early 80's before cameras started coming with built in electric flash! You younguns take all this 'newfangled' stuff for granted since you've always had it, but it's weird to think it wasn't really all that long ago stuff was much lower tech than it is now.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2007, 01:35:32 PM by Annie »

Offline clockworkgirl21

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Re: Olga photographs II
« Reply #149 on: July 27, 2007, 09:10:55 PM »