Author Topic: Photoshoped Images II  (Read 156117 times)

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Offline Yelena Aleksandrovna

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #600 on: June 08, 2013, 04:13:55 PM »
Kassy, your Maria is really lovely!!! And Sophia, for being your first one it is really well made! Congratulations!! :-)

Offline HennAnastasia

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #601 on: August 01, 2013, 03:23:25 AM »
My first try...

Offline rosieposie

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #602 on: August 14, 2013, 01:09:19 AM »
Some look fantastic and some look creepy.   Just my opinion.
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Offline Yelena Aleksandrovna

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #603 on: January 03, 2014, 02:13:49 PM »
Queen Alexandra of the UK as Empress of Russia <Click on the image for a bigger view!>

« Last Edit: January 03, 2014, 02:38:12 PM by Yelena Aleksandrovna »

Offline Kassafrass

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #604 on: January 03, 2014, 06:40:51 PM »
Wow! I'm impressed with that last one Yelena. Good job :-)

One I did recently of Olga. Not a huge fan of it... It didn't end up looking like her.

« Last Edit: January 03, 2014, 06:43:02 PM by Kassafrass »
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Offline LaDuchesse

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #605 on: July 12, 2014, 11:07:53 PM »
I wasn't sure where to put this, so I hope it's alright. I intend to start a project of working on OTMAA and their families as if they had survived and to do a line onto current day.  If that makes any sense, basically a line of the monarchy if it had survived to today with a series of photoshopped images.  Anyways, to start off the line I would have to have an adult version of Alexei.  So I've been messing around a bit and would like anyone's input on if any of these look like an adult version of the tsarevich.


free screenshot software

Offline Ally Kumari

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #606 on: December 26, 2014, 04:01:24 AM »
That looks very interesting - and quite impressive! Do you plan to continue? I would definitely love to see more.

Offline Ally Kumari

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #607 on: December 26, 2014, 04:03:26 AM »
Anyway, I did these and wrote "alternative universe" book reviews for them :)



Finally a biography which has been missing on our book shelves for far too long. After her successful joint biography of Emperor Alexei II and his wife, Empress Ileana Fyodorovna, the author turns our attention to one of Emperor’s elder sisters. The narative takes us since the early beginning of Maria Nikolaevna’s life, through her idylic, if sometimes isolated childhood, and describes the horrors and hardships the young Grand Duchess endured during the Great War and Revolution. Previously unpublished diaries reveal the turmoil of a hasty rescue of the Imperial family from the Siberian city of Tobolsk, which nearly ended up in tragedy for one of Maria's sisters, after which they were all secretly spirited away into Crimea. There, finally old enough for the job, Maria Nikolaevna spent the rest of the war nursing the wounded. When finally peace was announced and monarchy in Russia restored, albeit in a new, constitutional form, the Grand Duchess returned after years to Petersburg and her home. The book does not disclose in much detail the political discussions which finally confirmed Nicholas II a deposed monarch and proclaimed his son Alexei a new Emperor, with his uncle Grand Duke Mikhail a regent until the boy woulc ome of age, however since one can easily look all information up in the already mentioned “Alexei & Ileana”, all is well.

While Grand Duchess' life between the year 1918-1920 must have seemed uneventful from the public point of view, the newly discovered and for the first time ever published material finally confirms that the period was marked by an emotional struggle for her. As soon as 1919 she found herself in love with General Prince Mikhail Danilov, almost ten years her senior. After a series of misunderstandings, which sprouted from a mutual feeling of not being deserving to love each other, and later the opposition of the former Empress Alexandra, who felt Danilov was too experienced (and low in rank) for her innocent daughter, the two were finally married in a lavish ceremony in Winter Palace chappel. Taking a permanent residence in the palace of Gatchina, where Prince Danilov joined the regiment of Blue Cuirasiers, the couple led a quiet life for years, together with their children: Princess Anastasia (*1923), twin Princes Konstantin and Peter (*1925) and Prince Nicholas (*1929). The Danilov family maintained close relationship with the court and Maria's brother the Emperor, helping his young wife Ileana to adjust to her new position.

Already popular for her amiable nature and various charity activities (Grand Duchess, now Princess Danilova, personally stood at the birth of the most effective system of local public healthcare units all over Russia, more than 50 schools, and became a renowned patroness of talented Russian artists), Maria Nikolaevna became nothing short of a legend with the outburst of the World War II. As her husband fought relentlessly against the Germans, she turned the palace of Gatchina into a hospital, following an example of her mother so many years back. Unfortunatelly, as the Germans marched on, Gatchina soon found itself in their stride, with nobody able to help. The Emperor's sister managed to move heaven and earth to organize a safe transport of more than a thousands patients to other towns, however, aware that she would be a most valuable hostage , she decided not to follow. Instead, she disappeared.

Four months pregnant with her youngest child, the 42 years old Grand Duchess seemingly vanished into thin winter air. The German troops could only stare into a blinding whiteness of the Russian planes, as their limbs were slowly freezing and Maria Nikolaevna passed from reality into a myth for several months. Accompanied only by one of her fellow nurses and a young officer (close friend of her husband), she headed from Gatchina down south. Traveling mostly on foot and cut off from information, she stayed in litle villages among peasants, not disclosing her indentity. But rumours travel quickly, and soon sightings of her were reported by various people, who claimed to have seen. Both the Germans and the Russians searched frantically for her, however soon the “sightings” were so numerous and reported at the same time from completely different places, that the search turned into nothing.

The missing Grand Duchess soon became a popular tale among the common people, who let their imagination run wild and transformed her into a magical being, appearing in the least expected moment in front of little huts, cloacked in white and with a crown of ice diamonds on her head. Whoever would refuse to offer her a shelter, would inevitably be punished. In many minds Maria Nikolaevna blended with the figure of Snegurochka - Snow Maiden from Russian fairytales. She would be called thus fondly among the public for the rest of her life. When she finally reapeared in Ilinkoye, dressed indeed in white (in her nursing uniform) but without any diamonds to adorn herself with, her husband rushed to her side and was presented with their youngest child, Princess Ekaterina.

Maria Nikolaevna led an active life in the years post the war as well, continuting with her philathropy and charity activities, supporting her brother and when he prematurely died after an accident in 1956, she was one of the most loved and trusted people who gathered around his son, Emperor Fyodor IV. Death of her husband, Prince Danilov, sent her into a severe depression, which she managed to overcome only with the help of her sisters. She followed the man of her heart to the other side ten years later, exactly on a day, in 1987.

Her Imperial Highness Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna, Princess Danilova, certainly stands tall among the most fascinating and inspirational characters of Russia history, and going through the pages of her biography is an extremely rewarding and enriching experience. To end on a truly high note, we have been informed that the author is currently busy working on another biography, and that of Maria's elder sister, Queen Tatiana of Yugoslavia. She is also in talks with the Danish royal family, who could provide her with neccessary documents for a planned biography of Princess Anastasia, wife of Prince Knud of Denmark. Unfortunatelly there seems to be no immediate plan for a biography of the eldest sister, Olga, who gave up her Imperial title and lived in the Crimea as a professional writer, marrying a commoner Vladislav Shevchenko in 1930 (the couple had one son), living life according to her own terms. It appears the former Grand Duchess destroyed many of her diaries and letters, and whatever is left must not be touched for another twenty years, according to her wish.

Offline Ally Kumari

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #608 on: December 26, 2014, 04:03:50 AM »


After a storming success of Snegurochka, which offered the readers an intimate portrait of Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna, the author claims her share of our attention with her latest and no less fascinating venture. This time the focus shifts to Queen Tatiana of Yugoslavia, nee Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia, elder sister to Maria, and arguably the most elegant and popular Queen of her time. The book starts with the birth of the Grand Duchess Tatiana in 1897, progressing steadily towards the first big twist in the life of the girl, lacing the narrative with fresh anecdotes from the previously unpublished materials. It is commendable that the author manages to describe the events of the Great War and revolution of 1917 in yet another way from her already two published books (“Alexei and Ileana” and the already mentioned “Snegurochka”). Needless to say, the most interesting part of Tatiana’s life began itself only after the war and restoration of the monarchy in Russia.

As soon as 1919 Tatiana Nikolaevna became the most sought after royal bride in Europe, since her elder sister Olga categorically refused to even deal with the proposals (thus sending shock waves throughout the royal courts), whilst Anastasia Nikolaevna was focusing on her artistic career (at the time she believed she might become a professional painter) and rumours of Maria Nikolaevna’s budding romance with a Russian officer Danilov threatened to tarnish her reputation. Tatiana’s mother, former Empress Alexandra, was anxious that at least her favourite daughter would marry “equally” and without scandals. The book reveals the pressure the young woman, only recently recovered from her horrific experiences of war and revolution, had to endure after a formal proposal from King Alexander of Serbia arrived in  December 1920. Contrary to the popular belief that she was forced into marrying, the book discloses the facts which shed a better light on the whole situation: the Grand Duchess was hesitant and unsure even as she walked down the aisle, at the same time the decision she took was hers alone - and one she did not grow to regret.

Within a week she knew Alexander loved her, within a month she knew she could trust him with her life, within a year she loved him back. “Mine was a slow burn, not an instant fireworks like yours,” she wrote jokingly to her sister Maria, who had announced her impending marriage. “But the flame burns just as bright now.” Love seemed to follow in Tatiana’s footsteps. While her initial months in Belgrade, less opulent and splendid than the court of her childhood, proved difficult - with the young Queen feeling awfully homesick - her sense of duty and inborn confidence triumphed in the end. Tatiana had an imperious manner and regal bearing, yet her every interaction with her subjects was always respectful and almost motherly. In her best efforts to support her husband and country in the post-war years and later Tatiana took great inspiration in her aunt, Queen Maria of Romania. The regular letters which flew between Belgrade and Bucharest sealed a bond between the two Queens, but also brought Tatiana into a less than enviable situation as her own mother often rebuked her for not listening to her advice and also felt jealous of Queen Marie’s influence.

Tatiana became gradually extremely popular, partly because she ensured the succession to the throne. Three sons were born to her and king Alexander: Peter, Tomislav and Andrej. Perhaps the most interesting and valuable contribution of the book to the public knowledge is a sensitively portrayed relationship between the King and his Queen. To the outside world Alexander and Tatiana seemed detached and cold towards one another. There has never been any public display of tender emotions and complete lack of any intimate correspondence or pictures made everyone believed there was no correspondence or pictures. The author proves everybody wrong. The recently discovered and translated letters reveal the deep mutual love between the royal couple, which is often expressed in terms almost shy, even whole years after marriage. The letters also shed a light on the famous trademark statement Queen Tatiana often made at public functions: “For God’s love and yours!” was first used in a note she wrote to Alexander to tell him about her first pregnancy. His assassination in 1934 was a terrible blow to her, but her sense of duty upheld her during the crisis.

As Dowager Queen she did not withdraw from the public life, on the contrary she became regent to her son Peter, until he came of age. During the World War II Tatiana refused to flee the country and stayed in Belgrade in spite of occupation. She soon became a popular symbol of resistance, only fearing the enemy would use her to blackmail the Allies and her Russian relatives. However the loyalty of her subjects never wavered and the Queen happily lived to see the end of the war. In her later year Tatiana suffered from rheumatism and migraines, brought on by poor conditions of her palace in Belgrade, severely damaged during the war. She kept delaying the repairs, dedicating her money and efforts into public welfare. When her sister Olga arrived for a visit in 1952, she was appalled. As she wrote to her brother, Tsar Alexei II: “Tatiana is awfully pale, very thin and the state of her rooms is shameful! Even Tobolsk seems more cozy in my memory. She is obviously not bothered though, saying she is too old to throw tea parties for fancy people anyway, and she herself is hardly at home. I must say that in spite of all this, her eyes are shining with some inner light. She feels in peace when she can truly organize and help others.” The ailments, however, grew worse with each passing year and by 1960 she could hardly move without a wheelchair. Never complaining, though in much pain, Tatiana Nikolaevna died in winter 1963 of general exhaustion. The Queen, much loved across the generations, was deeply mourned.

The book deserves much praise not only for presenting the reader with information yet unknown, but for being skilfully put together. The story of the five remarkable siblings gets another addition, seamlessly continuing from the narrative started by the author few years ago.

Offline Duchess Hydrangea

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #609 on: December 26, 2014, 11:45:05 AM »
I wasn't sure where to put this, so I hope it's alright. I intend to start a project of working on OTMAA and their families as if they had survived and to do a line onto current day.  If that makes any sense, basically a line of the monarchy if it had survived to today with a series of photoshopped images.  Anyways, to start off the line I would have to have an adult version of Alexei.  So I've been messing around a bit and would like anyone's input on if any of these look like an adult version of the tsarevich.


free screenshot software

The second and the third one.
Arthur of The Last Russian Czarhttp://www.amazon.com/Last-Russian-Czar-H-Carpathia/dp/1600431690/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1438094724&sr=8-6&keywords=the+last+russian+czar&pebp=1438094722063&perid=0HY1DJMAWA2SXA4BFAJ3

Offline TimM

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #610 on: December 26, 2014, 12:17:05 PM »
As a writer of alternate reality myself, I love your "book promotions", Ally.
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Offline wakas

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #611 on: December 27, 2014, 04:17:01 AM »
 I  love it too, Ally. Those "books reviews" are amazing.
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Offline Ally Kumari

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #612 on: December 28, 2014, 12:20:12 PM »
Thank you both! I might try and do Anastasia and Olga too, hopefully I will get some more inspiration.

Offline TimM

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #613 on: December 28, 2014, 06:22:55 PM »
Quote
I might try and do Anastasia and Olga too

Go for it!
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Offline LaDuchesse

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Re: Photoshoped Images II
« Reply #614 on: December 29, 2014, 09:33:32 PM »
The first one I've been satisfied with!  Tatiana and Felix.  Any advice's great.