Author Topic: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson  (Read 148132 times)

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Offline imperial angel

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #420 on: October 27, 2011, 10:28:24 AM »
I recently read this book (I know, a little late) and thought it was a great book that cleared up a lot of things I found confusing in other books about AA( a lot about her claim with the little details, languages, memories, who she "recognized" from her past and when, was confusing precisely because it didn't add up to a coherent whole), and that clearly shows she never could have been Anastasia, and why.It seems to be the last word on the subject to me.Then again, the meaning of Anastasia's name was Resurrection, a name that fitted AA as well (even though her real name was the more prosaic Franziska).

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #421 on: October 27, 2011, 10:52:30 AM »
Imperail Angel

I agree - it answers the questions.

But some people still believe the earth is flat there are people insisting on Amazon that AA was genuine!

Interestingly, Herman Goering was at one point a patient at Dalldorf Lunatic Asylum - when he was first addicted to morphine in the 1920s he was sent there as 'a dangerous drug addict'.

Ann

Offline TimM

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #422 on: October 27, 2011, 10:57:20 AM »
Quote
Interestingly, Herman Goering was at one point a patient at Dalldorf Lunatic Asylum - when he was first addicted to morphine in the 1920s he was sent there as 'a dangerous drug addict'

I wonder if he was there when AA was there.
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Offline Sunny

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #423 on: October 27, 2011, 11:15:09 AM »
Quote
Interestingly, Herman Goering was at one point a patient at Dalldorf Lunatic Asylum - when he was first addicted to morphine in the 1920s he was sent there as 'a dangerous drug addict'

I wonder if he was there when AA was there.

having the girl who survived - the only living daughter of Nicholas escaped the murder... what a anti - comunism, rirresistible piece of propaganda could thishave been for Goering!
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Offline Kalafrana

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #424 on: October 27, 2011, 12:06:49 PM »
'I wonder if he was there when AA was there.'

That's what I'm wondering, though Goering was at the nadir of his fortunes then, and with no power or influence whatever.

Of course, the Nazis later liquidated several thousand mental patients - presumably Goering kept pretty quiet about having been one!

Ann

Offline Lady-in-Waiting

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #425 on: October 27, 2011, 01:00:03 PM »
According to King & Wilson's Resurrection of the Romanovs, AA left Dalldorf in May 1922. But Goering's morphine addiction didn't begin until after he was shot during the Beer Hall Putsch in November 1923, so he must have been there later than AA.

In any case, Dalldorf had a dozen buildings and averaged more than 1500 patients at a time. Even if they had both been in the asylum at the same time, it's unlikely they would have met.
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Offline stepan

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #426 on: October 27, 2011, 07:40:03 PM »
In fact AA had been a patient in Dalldorf twice. First some months at the beginning of 1917 and then again in 1920.  This according to King and Wilson. I was rather surprized when I read this. That noone remembered or recognized miss Unkown. Even if it was a big hospital with many patients someone should have remembered her. But for some reason noone did and the world got this fantastic Anna Anderson story!

Offline Greg_King

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #427 on: October 27, 2011, 08:26:06 PM »
No one remembered her because the institution was so large-and, as we said in the book, why would they? It is a measure of how insignificant and alone Franziska was that she made no impressions and had no friends.  Add in the staff turnover and the patient turnover during the war and after, the passage of several years, patients being in different buildings tended by different staff-and you have a reasonable explanation.

Offline TimM

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #428 on: October 28, 2011, 10:56:44 AM »
Yeah, it was not until later that she became well known.
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Offline Romafan96

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #429 on: September 06, 2015, 12:02:17 PM »
I don't think Nicholas would have wanted to rule again, even if it had been offered.  His writings give no indication of this.  He might have been more than happy to spend the rest of his life in exile on a farm somewhere sawing wood.

However bad a leader he may have been, it did NOT justify the brutal murder of himself and his family.  If a man is guilty of a crime, you put him on trial for said crime.  Of course, thugs and murderers like the Bolsheviks were didn't believe in due process.

Anyway, we're off topic again.  Sorry folks.

Tim, I must respectfully disagree here. Nicholas believed, right up until the end, that he was God's appointed ruler of Russia. Whilst Nicholas adjusted well to his exile, that could be down to his unwavering belief in "God's will" as opposed to coming to terms with the fact he just wasn't cut out for ruling. Had he been offered throne, he would have also seen this as "God's Will" and accepted.

Offline GD Alexandra

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Re: "Resurrection of the Romanovs: Anastasia, Anna Anderson" by King And Wilson
« Reply #430 on: February 26, 2016, 01:34:21 PM »
Quick question, I haven't read this book yet. I would like to know if the content is similar to Fate of the Romanovs (regarding the days the IF remained in captivity and the murders) or if it includes new information. I'm aware the authors reach different conclusions, but I'm curious about the facts, or historical accounts.

Offline Sarushka

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Quick question, I haven't read this book yet. I would like to know if the content is similar to Fate of the Romanovs (regarding the days the IF remained in captivity and the murders) or if it includes new information. I'm aware the authors reach different conclusions, but I'm curious about the facts, or historical accounts.

It's been quite a while since I read either book, but if memory serves, Resurrection's account of the captivity and murders is basically an abridged version of FOTR's. I don't recall any new information being presented.
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Offline Kalafrana

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Yes. Essentially, that part of the book is 'scene-setting' for the main material, which begins when Fraulein Unbekannt is pulled out of the Landwehr Canal. Before that, there is also some discussion on Anastasia's character, but the meat of the book is very much from 1920 onwards.

Ann

Offline TimM

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Yeah, the gist of the book is how FS became AA.   It's a good read.
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