Alexander Palace Forum

Books and Films about the Romanovs and Imperial Russia => Books about the Romanovs and Imperial Russia => Topic started by: Namarolf on April 12, 2004, 09:34:45 AM

Title: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Namarolf on April 12, 2004, 09:34:45 AM
Has anyone read a book by Victor Alexandrov, "The end of the Romanovs"?
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Greg_King on April 13, 2004, 01:27:33 AM
It contains some interesting material and assertions, along with some really horrible mistakes and crude characterizations of N and A.  And unfortunately written at a time when footnoting sources was not done.

Among the material cut from "The Fate of the Romanovs" was a pretty lengthy bibliographic review of ALL books dealing with the last days of the Romanovs, from 1920 to the present day.  We DID include this in the special issue of "Atlantis" devoted to material cut from the book.  Perhaps Penny can post the relevant bits.

Greg King
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Penny_Wilson on April 13, 2004, 11:12:54 AM
From Atlantis' Magazine's special Fate of the Romanovs issue:

"In 1966, author Victor Alexandrov published his book The End of the Romanovs. Although it contained some interesting new information, the book’s value was undermined by its numerous factual errors.  Alexandrov asserted that Rasputin’s real surname had been “Novikh,” and that he had been a German spy during the First World War. (Alexandrov, 106-08)  He apparently had little understanding of the Romanov Family, writing that Alexandra had been awarded a doctorate in philosophy from Heidelberg University before her marriage; (Alexandrov, 109) that “Alexandra Feodorovna’s brother the Duke [sic] of Hesse had died” from hemophilia; (Alexandrov, 148) that Lili Dehn was the Empress’s “Lady’s Maid;” (Alexandrov, 142) and that Empress Marie Alexandrovna had given her eldest son, Tsesarevich Nicholas, hemophilia, which resulted in his premature death. (Alexandrov, 148)  A simple reading of any of the available source material then published would easily have revealed Alexandrov’s errors.

"Then, too, Alexandrov engaged in some literary flights of fancy.  He spent several pages recounting an entire conversation between Nicholas and Alexandra in his Study in the Alexander Palace at Tsarskoye Selo, a meeting for which, according to the author, the pair was alone.  According to Alexandrov, he “recreated” this scene from, which appears on pages 124-125 of his book, from an alleged unpublished story told later by the Empress herself-to whom he does not say, and his book was published at a time when source notes were presumably deemed cumbersome.  Like much of what is contained within his book, it raises an instant note of caution.

"Yet for all of these problems, Alexandrov’s book is not easily dismissed.  Of Russian heritage himself, he moved through Parisian émigré circles and certainly interviewed many of those still alive who had in some manner been involved in the final months of the Romanovs’ captivity.  Then, too, his access to some obscure information and documents helped fill in some gaps in the existing record, particularly in reference to events within the Ural Regional Soviet during the crucial first two weeks of July 1918.  His biggest coup, however, rested on a previously unpublished source, the “Gutek File,” which was said to contain an eyewitness account of the murders and disposal of the bodies as related by Peter Voikov, the former Ural Regional Commissar of Supplies.  Alexandrov concluded, on the basis of this document, which largely echoed the information to be found in any number of previous accounts, that the entire Imperial Family had been murdered, though the “Gutek File” itself contained any number of potential problems."

And about the Gutek file:

"In 1930, Gregory Bessedovsky, a secretary at the Soviet Embassy in Warsaw who had served under former Ural Regional Soviet Commissar of Supplies Peter Voikov, published his memoirs, Im Dienste Der Sowjets, in Leipzig.  Bessedovsky devoted several pages to an account of the Ekaterinburg murders.  He related a peculiar tale.  According to Bessedovsky, one night in 1925, Voikov drank too much and drunkenly spilled out his story of the murder of the Romanovs.  This essentially followed the accepted White version, though Voikov included himself as a participant in the shooting. (Bessedovsky, 200-208)

Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Penny_Wilson on April 13, 2004, 11:13:10 AM
"Authors Anthony Summers and Tom Mangold found this highly suspicious, and learned that Bessedovsky had, in fact, written a number of books, including at least one said to be the memoirs of Stalin’s non-existent nephew.  They quote Bessedovsky as saying: “I write books for idiots.  Do you imagine that anyone in the West would read my books if I tried to reproduce the sense and shape of my subjects' statements?” To Summers and Mangold, this was enough to indict the Voikov story as a fabrication. (See Summers/Mangold, 182)

"There is, though, something unconvincing about this argument.  The statement attributed to Bessedovsky above makes no claim to complete fabrication, but rather to a reinterpretation of the original sense related by his subjects.  It is a technical point, and certainly one which sounds a note of caution, but not one which should automatically dismiss Bessedovsky’s purported revelations.  There is, in fact, some degree of confirmation for Bessedovsky’s claims of Voikov’s confession, although this, too, is somewhat troubled.  The story is told by author Victor Alexandrov, who discovered an original record of the official Polish inquiry from the Warsaw Court of the Assizes into Voikov’s assassination.  This was apparently found after World War II in the former home house of a man named Gutek, who had served as Secretary to the Investigating Magistrate in 1927.  Among the papers was a record of a drunken conversation in which Voikov re-told the story of the Ekaterinburg massacre. (Alexandrov, 228)

"The lack of provenance in this case indicates a degree of caution, and no one seems to have seen the file in question since Alexandrov examined it in the 1960s.  Alexandrov himself was convinced of its authenticity.  He noted the account’s distinct similarities with Bessedovsky’s tale of the same incident, which had been published in 1930. (Alexandrov, 228-29)  It is possible, of course, that the entire tale was some elaborate fabrication, though if this were the case one would expect that the so-called “Gutek” file would not have languished in obscurity until the 1960s, particularly when the basic information it contained coincided to a large degree with Bessedovsky’s own account.

"The truth of the matter may never be resolved.  We are simply forced to accept or reject Voikov’s tale on the preponderance of the available evidence.  On the surface, there are sound reasons for questioning its authenticity, not the least of which is the question of content.  Voikov’s account is unique in claiming for himself an actual role in the shooting-a fact not mentioned by any other known participant, and now known to be untrue; it also simply repeated the story that the bodies had been cut apart and burned-something that the actual Voikov knew to be untrue.  And yet, even with these difficulties, it is perhaps possible to regard the tale with some degree of cautious acceptance.  That it appeared in two different forms, from two different sources, who apparently heard it at the same time from Voikov himself, does serve to indicate that there might be truth to the assertion that the former Ural Regional Soviet Commissar for Supplies did indeed drunkenly spill out a tale of his experiences one night.  That it contains variations from what we know to have taken place does not necessarily cast its overall authenticity into doubt; nearly every account of the Romanov murders available to us contains multiple contradictions.  It must also be recalled that Voikov was said to have been drunk, in which state some variation-and, indeed, deliberate elaboration-might be expected.  In short, the “Gutek” and Bessedovsky stories, without firm evidence, cannot be dismissed out of hand, nor can they be considered unquestionably reliable."
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Namarolf on April 13, 2004, 11:25:56 AM
Thanks a lot Greg and Penny!!
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Namarolf on April 18, 2004, 11:23:00 PM
Thanks again Greg and Penny- Just finished reading "The end of the Romanovs", and I agree 100% with all you said. I simply feel the author is deeply resentful toward the Romanovs, mainly N & A, and thinks somehow they got what they deserved and asked for.
However, the book has some interesting information -I just wished the author would have said where did he got it from. Some sources he do mentions are quite unreliable, like Anna Aleksandrovna Virubova's alleged secret diary, which now is known to be a Bolshevik fabrication.
By the way, I found another mistake in the book -not an important one, but it may interest you: Alexandrov says Mrs. Virubova lived once in the Ipatiev house, because Grand Duchess Maria wrote her, "we are living in the same house where you once lived". However, checking other data on A. A. V., I found out that during a trip to Siberia she had actually stayed in the Governor's House in Tobolsk -so the letter from the Grand Duchess was simply sent from Tobolsk, not Ekaterinburg, where A. A. never lived.
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Joanna on April 20, 2004, 09:49:59 PM
When I first saw this thread I was curious and requested it immediately from the library. I then read Greg's and Penny's posts and was disinclined to read it but as it was on order I picked it up today. I was surprised at the number of photographs. Some I have never seen especially of the icons and medals and of Alexandra's umbrella and bottle of verbena. The author has misidentified some of the photographs such as #33 which is in the AP garden and #34 I believe is of Alexis at the Stavka but I could be wrong. Photo #42 he quotes as the last bedroom of the Grand Duchesses but I remember seeing a different one with the cots and chairs with clothes of the GDs. It is startling to see the diary of Alexis of July 31, 1917.

Joanna
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Greg_King on April 21, 2004, 12:39:25 AM
Quote
When I first saw this thread I was curious and requested it immediately from the library. I then read Greg's and Penny's posts and was disinclined to read it but as it was on order I picked it up today. I was surprised at the number of photographs. Some I have never seen especially of the icons and medals and of Alexandra's umbrella and bottle of verbena. The author has misidentified some of the photographs such as #33 which is in the AP garden and #34 I believe is of Alexis at the Stavka but I could be wrong. Photo #42 he quotes as the last bedroom of the Grand Duchesses but I remember seeing a different one with the cots and chairs with clothes of the GDs. It is startling to see the diary of Alexis of July 31, 1917.

Joanna


Alexandrov's photo 42 is actually from Sokolov's Dossier-it is the room in Perm where Hendrikova, Schneider, and Volkov were kept.

Greg King
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Rachael89 on June 16, 2006, 03:50:14 AM
Hi everyone

Just got back from holiday to Scotland for my birthday! I was really pleased because I found a copy of the book mentioned in the title, albeit for £4.49 (that is extremely high for a charity shop in my book!)

I haven't been able to read it all the way through, but what I have read is fascinating! All the photos are wonderful, I have only seen several of them reproduced else where, so this is like a gold mine for me! Even if OTMA are constantly mislabelled.

It is made up of photos the author found in two boxes containing photographic plates, boxes gathered by Sokolov himself! There are also two eyewitness reports of the murder, that I have never seen elsewhere, so they are endlessly fascinating. As you can guess, I was reading the book on the plane back from Scotland  ;D!

Does anyone know anything about this book, is it rare etc.? Also post your own reviews and opinions of the book!

Best

Rachael

P.S. There are some photos I am confused about, so I will post them later to ask of you what you think they are.
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Sarushka on June 16, 2006, 08:06:19 AM
A review of End of the Romanovs from Atlantis magazine:

In 1966, author Victor Alexandrov published his book The End of the Romanovs. Although it contained some interesting new information, the book’s value was undermined by its numerous factual errors.  Alexandrov asserted that Rasputin’s real surname had been “Novikh,” and that he had been a German spy during the First World War. (Alexandrov, 106-08)  He apparently had little understanding of the Romanov Family, writing that Alexandra had been awarded a doctorate in philosophy from Heidelberg University before her marriage; (Alexandrov, 109) that “Alexandra Feodorovna’s brother the Duke [sic] of Hesse had died” from hemophilia; (Alexandrov, 148) that Lili Dehn was the Empress’s “Lady’s Maid;” (Alexandrov, 142) and that Empress Marie Alexandrovna had given her eldest son, Tsesarevich Nicholas, hemophilia, which resulted in his premature death. (Alexandrov, 148)  A simple reading of any of the available source material then published would easily have revealed Alexandrov’s errors.

Then, too, Alexandrov engaged in some literary flights of fancy.  He spent several pages recounting an entire conversation between Nicholas and Alexandra in his Study in the Alexander Palace at Tsarskoye Selo, a meeting for which, according to the author, the pair was alone.  According to Alexandrov, he “recreated” this scene from, which appears on pages 124-125 of his book, from an alleged unpublished story told later by the Empress herself-to whom he does not say, and his book was published at a time when source notes were presumably deemed cumbersome.  Like much of what is contained within his book, it raises an instant note of caution.

Yet for all of these problems, Alexandrov’s book is not easily dismissed.  Of Russian heritage himself, he moved through Parisian émigré circles and certainly interviewed many of those still alive who had in some manner been involved in the final months of the Romanovs’ captivity.  Then, too, his access to some obscure information and documents helped fill in some gaps in the existing record, particularly in reference to events within the Ural Regional Soviet during the crucial first two weeks of July 1918.  His biggest coup, however, rested on a previously unpublished source, the “Gutek File,” which was said to contain an eyewitness account of the murders and disposal of the bodies as related by Peter Voikov, the former Ural Regional Commissar of Supplies.  Alexandrov concluded, on the basis of this document, which largely echoed the information to be found in any number of previous accounts, that the entire Imperial Family had been murdered, though the “Gutek File” itself contained any number of potential problems.

Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Belochka on June 17, 2006, 02:02:14 AM
[size=10]Despite the obvious flaws this publication contains, it is worth having a copy if only to provide a contrast to scholary publications.

This book is certainly not rare Rachael, however it is advisable to view the contents with caution.

Margarita[/size]
 ;)
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Rachael89 on June 17, 2006, 12:11:06 PM
Hi everyone

Thankyou for your input guys, the historical accuracy dosen't worry me, because by now I trust myself to know the facts from a vareity of sources - I have 15 books on the Romanovs now!

As for it's rarity, I'm not sure about the U.S.A, but I've never seen a copy for sale in England before, in shops, on e-bay etc. etc. and it's nice to have a book that's no longer in print.

Here are the two photos I was confused about:

(http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c124/Rachael89/th_analast.jpg) (http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c124/Rachael89/analast.jpg)

This photo is labelled as being the last photo of Anastasia taking a few weeks before her death. I beleive this must be wrong, because I read somewhere they had their camera's confiscated soon after arrival at Ekateinburg. Anastasia's hair is down, so I'm guessing it's before she was 16, but she also looks quite old and grown up, so I'm guessing anytime between Summer of 1916 and Summer of 1917, is this correct?

(http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c124/Rachael89/th_alexeiill.jpg) (http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c124/Rachael89/alexeiill.jpg)

This photo is labelled as being taken by the Tsar on the last day at Tolbosk, this seems about right to me, because Alexeilooks too old for it to be any other time. I was just wondering what illness was Alexei suffering from at this time? And does anyone have any idea what the bizarre thing on his head is?

I look forward to your responses!

Rachael
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Sarushka on June 17, 2006, 03:42:12 PM
The photo of Aleksei was taken at Stavka in 1915 or 1916. He's in his camp bed, with the mattress rolled up around him, and a pillow or towel on his head. It looks to me like he was "playing war" -- if you look carefully, you can see that he's pointing a toy rifle at the camera. I have another photo taken at the same time, which I can post when I get home from work.

I think you're right about the picture of Anastasia. It was definitely not taken in Tobolsk or Ekaterinburg. It looks to me as if she's standing in front of the imperial train. Again, when I get home, I will look through my collection and see if I have any other pictures of Anastasia from that day, because her dress & hat look quite familiar to me.

I know Lanie once made a posting about the innaccuracies in Alexandrov's captions. It's probably in the old threads, though, because I've done a search and haven't been able to locate it...
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Sarushka on June 17, 2006, 08:41:37 PM
Ok, in my collection, the photo Racheal posted of Anastasia is labeled as 1916. Here's another of her, taken by Count Alexander Grabbe in 1916. I believe this was the same day as the one listed in Alexandrov's book as being taken in Siberia:
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/sarahelizabethii/Romanov/Anastasia/th_PrivateWorldofLastTsar065.jpg) (http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/sarahelizabethii/Romanov/Anastasia/PrivateWorldofLastTsar065.jpg)


Here's the mate to the photo of Aleksei:
(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/sarahelizabethii/Romanov/Aleksei/th_AlekseiinMogilev1916.jpg) (http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/sarahelizabethii/Romanov/Aleksei/AlekseiinMogilev1916.jpg)
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: s.v.markov on June 18, 2006, 04:33:07 AM
That was a good buy, Rachael! There are several copies listed on 'abebooks.co.uk' but they range from £6.00 - £18.00! It is an interesting book (as these pictures and posts show), andl worth a place in a discerning Romanov student's library, despite flaws and errors. Keep searching!
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Rachael89 on June 19, 2006, 07:56:20 AM
Hi everyone

Firstly thankyou for all your wonderful, wonderful replies! They have all been very interesting!

But anyway, you will not beleive what I found in a charity shop today! A copy of The Last Granduchess by Ian Vorres, for wait for it, £1.25! Is this book rare? I think it is cos I have only seen one copy on Amazon (anewer copy and that was for around £125! Is this the highly regarded book about Olga? Or the other one that no one likes very much?

Thankyou once again for your help!

Rachael
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Sarushka on June 19, 2006, 10:51:12 AM
Yes, it is indeed rare, and you got quite a deal! Last Grand Duchess rarely goes for less than $50 in the US; I thought my copy for $15 was a steal!

Here is a thread that mentions it:
Once a Grand Duchess (http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/YaBB.cgi?num=1117893909/7#7)

I like Last Grand Duchess very much. It's Olga Aleksandrovna's memoirs, as recorded by Vorres near the end of her life. IMO, it gives a much better flavor of Olga's personality than a standard biography.
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Rachael89 on June 19, 2006, 11:55:52 AM
WOW  :o!!!!!!!!! I never thought it would go for that much! Thankyou for the info Sarushka.

I'm never going to part with it though, it is absolutely wonderful, this is gonna sound really cliched but it's really like Olga takes you back there with her memories.  GD Olga A has always been a favourite, because she's just such and interesting person, and this book helps me to understand her far better!

It's really just chance I even got it, I got the wrong bus back to college after study leave, a bus that was far to early and decided to walk into town rather than face boredom. I walked into all the charity shops (there was nothing better to do!) and all I found was an over-expensive copy of The Romanov Conspiracies, that I have already. I only found it when I walked into the very last charity shop, it was in the English royalty section, and I would of never realised it was there if I hadn't seen Vorres on the dustjacket! I couldn't actually remember who who was but I picked it up and there it was, once a grand duchess!

It also has a curious inscription:

March 20th 1965

A reminder (at first I thought this bit was in Russian!) of a rainy day.

To Rhoddy with Love.

This inscription's reallly odd, because it seems like the 'Rhoddy' who this book was dedicated to must of had something to do with the book's subject matter. I know this is probably just a day dream, but I wonder with the 'V' is Ian Vorres?  Oh well, I guess I'll probably never know who this 'Rhoddy' was!
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: s.v.markov on June 21, 2006, 06:56:16 AM
This must be your best 'find' to date, and just proves that these books are still out there if you are prepared to put in the time and effort. There are just two on offer on abebooks.co.uk at the moment, at £50.00 for a 3rd edition with no dust-wrapper and £62.50 for a first edition (with dustwrapper). From the date of the inscription, yours must be a first edition. Does it have a dust-wrapper?
Whether it does or not, it's an absolute dream to find it for £1.25. Good job Ra-Ra's on holiday ~ she wouldn't be able to cope with that!! I have two nice copies of the third edition ~ it was done in green leatherette with gold titles and the double eagle crest on the cover. One has been signed by Ian Vorres ~ apparently he signed the first 500 copies of this edition. It's a lovely book and I know you'll learn a lot from it. It's especially useful when considering the Anna Anderson affair, and GD Olga has some very telling comments to make (she shd know ~ she spent a lot of time with Anastasia). I agree with you about inscriptions on the fly-leaves of older books ~ I love them too and often wonder who the people were and under what circumstances they owned the book. My favourite (referred to on another thread) is on my 1927 copy of Benckendorff's 'Last Days at Tsarskoe Selo' which reads : 'My Dear Lizzie, I am sure you will appreciate these few words written by my husband, whom you knew in Russia, from your affectionate old grannie, Nice, S France, 20th May 1927.'  For years I wondered who Lizzie might be, but then, thanks to a knowledgeable member of the AP Forum, I began to find out about her..... It's all part of this wonderful world of the Romanovs.........Congratulations again on a great find. Look after it !
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Rachael89 on June 21, 2006, 07:55:48 AM
Thanks for your reply Markov, you're right, I am very, very lucky! Mine does have the dust jacket, but it has big tears, I'll do a scan at some point proabbly. The only thing I regret is that I didn't know it was worth anything at first so I looked at it without the dustjacket with dirty fingers   :-[ ! There are no a few light marks because of that but hopefully they will fade with time. From now on I am being extremely careful, yesterday I put a piece of cling film over the pages I was reading to make sure I didn't damage it! In fact I'm almost afraid to read it now I know it's value  :P!

I am glad to have the dustjacket because it has a lovely photo of Olga in old age that is not inside the book itself, I feel very priviledged to own a copy!

I feel sorry for Ra Ra, she dosen't have many good charity shops near her! I guess I must just be lucky because in the past month or two I have found...

The Last Tsar and Tsarina by Virginia Cowles - £2.99
The Romanovs by Virginia Cowles - £1
Anastasia: The Lost Princess - £1.50
The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov - £4.49
The Last Grand Duchess by Ian Vorres -£1.25

At one point all of these prices would of seen huge to me, but now I have a part time job, they don't seem quite so bad.

Also one of the charity shops had loads of books on Russian Orthodoxy one time, one was lovely in a  slip case with lot's of big colourful photos of the icons, but it was in Russian ( which I can't understand)and cost £5 that I didn't have, so I decided to leave it.

Best

Rachael

P.S. There is a trip with college to Russia next year! If I can afford it and persuade at least one of my friends to come with me, nothing's going to stop em going! A trip to Russia would REALLY be something to look forward to  :D!

Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Annie on February 28, 2008, 04:23:49 PM
This book seems full of very interesting info, but it does date back to 1966 making it possibly outdated in light of new discoveries. Does anyone have it, and what is your review of it? Thanks.
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Belochka on February 28, 2008, 04:49:15 PM
I have this book Annie.

The book is still very useful but is problematic in a number of areas.

Strangely enough there was a recent Russian language publication written by another person with the same surname: Alexei Alexandrov and his co-author Valeri Prishep, in 2006 which provides an excellent appraisal of many key documents (including those that appear for the first time in print), which they found in GARF relating to the Ekaterinburg massacre. It is a scholarly presentation that was compiled by two jurists from the Russian Federation.

Margarita
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Sarushka on February 28, 2008, 04:52:09 PM
The book is still very useful but is problematic in a number of areas.


I agree. I don't have a copy of my own so I can't comment on the text right now, but I recall that a great many of the photo captions are wildly inaccurate.
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Annie on February 28, 2008, 07:56:21 PM
Margarita- I didn't know there was a new book of the same name. Do they have this one in Russia?

Sarushka- yes the captions are inaccurate, they have one picture of Anastasia in her white dress and hat, long flowing hair, and it says it was the last picture ever taken of her soon before she died. Not.

I haven't read it all yet (I know I checked it out and read it back when I first got into the Romanovs in Jr. high but that was YEARS ago) but leafing through it I noticed a very interesting irony. In a letter from Maria to Anna V., it was revealed that 'we are staying at the house where you stayed'- the authors say apparently Anna V. and others who made the pilgrimage to Rasputin's village had spent the night in the Ipatiev house! *chills*
Title: Re: The End of the Romanovs by Victor Alexandrov
Post by: Rachael89 on March 04, 2008, 10:02:36 AM
I've read it and it had many problems, there are frequent inaccuracies and mistakes. It's an interesting read, but I had to take most of what I was reading with a pinch of salt due to the extremely dobutful nature of what was being said. I don't have the book with me (I'm at university) but if I did I'd be able to give examples of some of the mistakes.

However, it is good for the photos, even if they do all seem to be labelled wrong.

Rachael