Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => Rulers Prior to Nicholas II => Topic started by: Helen_Azar on February 11, 2005, 08:38:22 PM

Title: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 11, 2005, 08:38:22 PM
I don't know a lot about this particular Romanov, but I just read on of the Romanov websites that some  historians believe that Nicholas I poisoned himself after receiving news of the defeat of Russian forces at Evpatoria. It sounds a little strange and I was wondering if anyone knows anything about this. Thanks!
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Olga on February 11, 2005, 10:08:18 PM
I've heard that as well.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: bluetoria on February 12, 2005, 08:17:51 AM
Charlotte Zeepvat writes:
"Officially death came as a result of influenza, but some said an argument with the Tsarevich over the conduct of the war had produced a fit of rage, causing a massive stroke. Suicide has been suggested and others argue that Nicholas simply died of a broken heart."
Well, there's a few causes to choose from!
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Helen_Azar on February 12, 2005, 08:37:57 AM
Wow, it's hard to believe that no one really knows for sure what happened! This is not something that seems to be publicized a lot.... It does put a somewhat different spin on things, doesn't it... Could it have been a homocide? It sounds like the cause of death was so ambiguous that anything is possible, although there doesn't really seem to be a motive for homocide. But just him being a Tsar (and a relatively ruthless one too) could be motive enough for many...
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Mike on February 12, 2005, 12:04:21 PM
It seems very likely that Nicholas I decided to put an end to his life by consciously refusing to observe the regime and to take the medicines prescribed by his doctors after he was diagnosed with pneumonia. Probably he would die in any case, but he did everything possible - short of taking poison, which would be a mortal sin for a devote Christian - to "aid the nature".
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Belochka on February 28, 2005, 11:09:22 PM
According to my Russian language Encyclopedia of the Russian Monarchy (2003), and a few other related sources:

... Nikolai I's strength was severely tested when the Austrians had turned against him. He also became deeply concerned about the health of the Empress in late 1854. Not surprisingly, it was a combination of personal factors which dealt Nikolai a heavy burden to face.  

Therefore it is not inconceivable that his ensuing depression would cause his immune response to become compromised to such a degree that when he caught a cold, we was unwilling to fight on.

On 22 August 1855, Anna Tiutcheva (a maid-of-honor) noted that when she saw the Emperor in Church, she was struck by the immense transformation that occurred in him during the last few days.

"He looked depressed; suffering covered his face  with wrinkles ... At the sight of his prayer with a painful and concentrated look one could not help feeling a reverential and mournful compassion to this height of magnificence and might, humiliated and downcast in the face of God."

Two days before his death, in February 1855, his physician, Dr Mandt, appeared unconcerned about Nikolai's condition, because there were so many cases of the cold in SPb's cold and damp climate. Twelve hours later he succumbed.

The coincidence of his early demise and the Crimean defeat would surely lead to rumors that Nikolai was unable to face a shameful defeat, and therefore prefered to poison himself.

Considered to be a despot by his enemies, the rumor of a cowardly death would be hold more appeal than the real truth of his painful death.  
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Helen_Azar on March 01, 2005, 08:49:01 AM
Yes, that would make sense.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Elisabeth on March 02, 2005, 02:26:37 PM
Quote
Considered to be a despot by his enemies, the rumor of a cowardly death would be hold more appeal than the real truth of his painful death.  


I don't know, I think Russian historians like Eidelman viewed Nicholas's possible suicide more in the Roman tradition than in the Christian one - i.e., Nicholas I was if nothing else a Stoic, whose life was given over to duty to his motherland; therefore, if he died a suicide, it was the death of an honorable man (in the Roman sense: because he admitted responsibility for the dishonor of Russia's defeat in the Crimean War, he killed himself). Warrior cultures understand this notion of dishonor and salvaging honor through suicide (not just the Romans, but the Japanese). In other words, not all so-called "Soviet" historians took a "Soviet" view of Nicholas' possible suicide. (Many of them like Eidelman were in fact dissidents...)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Belochka on March 03, 2005, 09:45:56 PM
Quote

I don't know, I think Russian historians like Eidelman viewed Nicholas's possible suicide more in the Roman tradition than in the Christian one - i.e., Nicholas I was if nothing else a Stoic, whose life was given over to duty to his motherland; therefore, if he died a suicide, it was the death of an honorable man (in the Roman sense: because he admitted responsibility for the dishonor of Russia's defeat in the Crimean War, he killed himself). Warrior cultures understand this notion of dishonor and salvaging honor through suicide (not just the Romans, but the Japanese). In other words, not all so-called "Soviet" historians took a "Soviet" view of Nicholas' possible suicide. (Many of them like Eidelman were in fact dissidents...)


Suicide is not an honorable gesture in the Russian Orthodox sense, more so if it is the Emperor of Russia. As the ecclesiastic head of the Church, it was imperative he lead by pious example. Suicide is condemned by the Orthodox Church. To contemplate otherwise would dishonor the Russian State, the people of Russia and the Church.

Had he survived it would have been his duty to show the empire that military defeat can be overcome. The negativity of suicide would be seen as overt act of weekness and stupidity. Traits which Nikolai did not possess.

Why is it so difficult to believe that the poor man died from pneumonia? >:(
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: RomanovFan on June 22, 2005, 03:11:27 PM
What kind of ruler was he? Who did he marry and who were his kids? How many? ???
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Alexander_II on June 25, 2005, 10:57:09 AM
Nicholas married Alexandra Fedorovna nee Princess Charlotte of Prussia, daughter of Frederick William III of Prussia.  They had seven children in all.  The eldest, Alexander, would eventually become Alexander II, Konstantin, would play an improtant part in the naval reforms of the 1850s and the Great Reforms a decade later.  Of Nicholas's three daughters, the eldest, the blonde and blue eyed Maria, would become Duchess of Leuchtenberg, the black haired Olga, Queen of Wurttemberg but the youngest, Alexandra, who possessed considerable musical talent, would die only a year after marrying the Prince of Hesse-Cassel.  Later, Nicholas and Alexandra Fedorovna had two more sons: Nikolai, who would later become the Russian commander-in-chief in the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-8, and Mikhail, later Inspector-General of the Russian artillery.

Nicholas I was regarded as the most handsome monarch in Europe.  During his lifetime, many Russians admired him some even venerated him while others saw him as the personification of oppression.  Anyone who lived during his reign could not remain indifferent to the force  of his personality and the complex system which he imposed upon his country.

Suggest you read Nicholas I, Emperor & Autocrat of all the Russias by W. Bruce Lincoln.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: RomanovFan on June 27, 2005, 11:02:17 PM
I'll keep an eye out for that book.... books about Russian Royalty are hard to come by anymore...Thanks for the info. :)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: David_Pritchard on June 28, 2005, 12:42:57 AM
Nicholas I was an interesting character.

According to some accounts he slept on cot with a  leater matress stuffed with straw.

He designed in detail a prison in Chita for some of the Decemberists down to the placement of the stoves and windows to ensure that they would always be chilled in the winter and hot in the summer.

In order to have impressive troops on the parade grounds of Saint Petersburg, he spent large sums of money on new uniforms for the Imperial Guard rather than buy rifles for the entire army. This decision came back to haunt him during the Crimean War, when Russian troops were using Napoleonic era muskets against the English, French, Sardinians and the Turks with more modern arms.

The Moscow to Saint Petersburg rail line was constructed at great cost and loss of human life because Nicholas I drew a straight line between the cities on a map and said put the railroad here. No account was taken of the topography, rivers, hills, marshes etc.

He invaded Hungary and put down a popular rebellion against the Habsburgs, not because he liked the Habsburgs but because he found revolution objectionable.

He was definitely Emperor Paul's son.

DAP
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Alexander_II on June 28, 2005, 09:44:42 AM
He was indeed a drill master like his father but it should be noted that Nicholas by nature was a perfectionist with severe fixed principles of duty and order.  On the morning of his accession, Nicholas said, "Even if I shall be Emperor for only one hour I shall show myself worthy of the honour".  His opposition to rebellion of any kind was for the most part a paranoia installed in all reigning monarchs after the turbulent events of the French revolution, the proceeding Napoleonic era and the revolutionary insurgence of the 1830s and in 1848.  He saw it as a matter of honour to fulfill his contractural agreements with Austria and Prussia and he did not hesitate to send his armies to restore what he considered to be the established order in Western Europe earning him the name of the gendarme of Europe.

In so far as the railway story goes it should be clarified that the Austrian engineer Franz Anton Ritter von Gerstner constructed the railway at considerable cost to Russia.  Estimates for building the Moscow-St Petersburg line in 1842 were approximately 43,000,000 roubles, being more than a quarter of the entire annual state revenues at the time.  The project took nearly a decade!  It was however Nicholas's lack of energetic rail development that was seen as Russias major downfall in the Crimean War.

Nicholas's close involvement in the proceedings against the Decembrists was seen as a great violation of the principles of legality and as a consequence led to many untruthful stories to be attributed to him.  He was however as a person also very generous and charitable.  In fact, the Minister of the Imperial Household, Prince Volkonsky is recorded for having ordered that Nicholas's valet not put any money into the Emperors pockets before he went out because he would give it all away to whatever unfortunate he might encounter.  
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Paul on June 29, 2005, 11:19:14 PM
Quote
What kind of ruler was he? Who did he marry and who were his kids? How many? ???


Nicholas I married:


Pss Charlotte of Prussia (*13.7.1798 +20.10.R/1.11.1860) who took the name Alexandra Feodorovna. her brother later became Kaiser Wilhem I

Their children:


1.Czar ALEXANDER II *Moscow 29.4.1818 +assassinated at St.Petersburg 13.3.1881

2.Gr Duke Constantine *St.Petersburg 21.9.1827 +Pavlovsk 29.1.1892
m.St.Petersburg 11.9.1848 Pss Alexandra of Saxe-Altenburg (*Altenburg 8.7.1830, +St.Petersburg 6.7.1911)

3.Gr Duke Nicholai *Tsarskoie Selo 8.8.1831 +Alupka, Crimea 25.4.1891
m.St.Petersburg 6.2.1856 Dss Alexandra of Oldenburg (*St.Petersburg 2.6.1838 +Kiev 25.4.1900)

4. Gr Duke Michael *Peterhof 13R/25.10.1832 +Cannes 5R/18.12.1909
m.St.Petersburg 28.8.1857 Pss Cecile of Baden who took the name Olga Feodorovna (*20.9.1839 +12.4.1891)

5.Gr Dss Maria *Pavlovsk 18.8.1819 +St.Petersburg 21.2.1876
1m: St.Petersburg 14.7.1839 Maximilian de Beauharnais, Duke von Leuchtenberg (*2.10.1817 +1.11.1852);
2m: St.Petersburg 16.11.1856 Ct Grigori Strogonov (*18.6.1824 +13.3.1879)

6.Gr Dss Olga *St.Petersburg 11.9.1822, +Friedrichshafen 30.10.1892
m.Peterhof 13.7.1846 King Karl I of Württemberg (*6.3.1823 +6.10.1891)

7.Gr Dss Alexandra *St.Petersburg 24.6.1825, +Tsarskoe Selo 10.8.1844
m.St.Petersburg 28.1.1844 Friedrich Wilhelm, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel (*Kassel 26.11.1820, +Frankfurt 14.10.1884)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: RomanovFan on July 11, 2005, 06:48:34 PM
Queen Olga of Greece was Constantine's daughter, right? Mother of Olga, Elizabeth and Duchess Marina of Kent?
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: David_Pritchard on July 11, 2005, 11:34:53 PM
Grand Duchess Olga Konstaninovna of Russia, latter the Queen of the Hellenes was the daughter of Grand Duke Konstantin Nikolaievich, second son of Emperor Nikolas I.

She was the grandmother, not the mother of the Princess Olga, latter Princess of Yugoslavia; of the Princess Elizabeth, latter Countess von Toerring-Jettenbach; of the Princess Marina, latter Duchess of Kent. The mother of the three Greek princesses was Grand Duchess Helen Vladimirovna of Russia (sister of Grand Duke Kyrill). Grand Duchess Olga Konstaninovna was also the grandmother of the present Duke of Edinburgh.

DAP
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: RomanovFan on July 14, 2005, 04:56:40 PM
ooh..okay...here we go with the too many Olgas thing again...oh, I remember! It was Olga's son and his wife Elena Vladimirovna, they were the parents of Olga, Elizabeth and Marina, right? :)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: David_Pritchard on July 14, 2005, 05:27:11 PM
You are correct.

The parents of the three women are HRH Prince Nicholas of Greece and Denmark and his wife HIH Grand Duchess Helena Vladimirovna of Russia.

DAP
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: kenmore3233 on August 04, 2005, 08:30:14 PM
Quote
I don't know a lot about this particular Romanov, but I just read on of the Romanov websites that some  historians believe that Nicholas I poisoned himself after receiving news of the defeat of Russian forces at Evpatoria. It sounds a little strange and I was wondering if anyone knows anything about this. Thanks!


Nicholas definitely did not poison himself, and he didn't deliberately make himself sick because he wanted to die.

The Battle of Evpatoria that you allude to was a small and inconsequential battle. By no means did it have any impact on the overall course of the Crimean War.

As for the Crimean War itself, even though the Russians were not performing well, defeat was not a certainty when Nicholas died. There was still reason for believing that the Allies might ultimately be repulsed at Sevastapol.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: RomanovFan on August 22, 2005, 04:10:42 PM
Thanks Dave. But I have one more question...lol...what's with the title Her/His Imperial & Royal Highness? Wasn't that what Grand Duchess Elena's title was after she married Greek Nicholas? How does that title work?
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Macedonsky on August 23, 2005, 09:24:26 AM
Quote
what's with the title Her/His Imperial & Royal Highness? Wasn't that what Grand Duchess Elena's title was after she married Greek Nicholas? How does that title work?

At Russian court Imperial Highness always was considered higher than any other sort (Royal, Grand Ducal etc). So double title was not necessary and never used. Each consort could had own higher style.

For example in the official lists you can see "HH Prince John and HRH Princess Helene" or "HIH GDss Marie Alexandrovna, The Duchess of Edinburgh and HRH The Duke of Edinburgh".

Other courts could had their different rules.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Felipe II on November 12, 2005, 11:52:43 AM
In my opinion Nikolai I was one of the greatest emperors Russia ever had, on an equal footing with Peter the Great and Catherine the Great.
Under his reign Russia reached its greatest extension, and it was the last era in the Russian tsaristic history which was untroubled by assassinations etc.

(http://web1.bces-2030.de/russiaalexiii.gif)
The Russian Empire (around 1850)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: David_Pritchard on November 12, 2005, 12:22:32 PM
Dear Emp. N. I.,

You forgot to colour in the present day countries of Lithuania and Latvia. I did not see a red dot near San Francisco to represent Fort Rossiya (Fort Ross).

In regard to Russian-America on the map circa 1850, I believe that it reflects an earlier period, say 1810. In 1821 Tsar Aleksander I of Russia decreed that all lands along the Pacific Ocean from the Bering Strait to 51° north latitude belonged to Russia and that henceforth foreign shipping would be prohibited within 160 km (100 mi) of the claimed lands. This claim bit deep into the Oregon Territory, and, on US President Monroe's instructions, John Quincy Adams sent the Russian minister a note refusing to recognize the tsar's decree:

“We should contest the right of Russia to any territorial establishment on this continent,” wrote Adams, adding that “we should assume distinctly the principle that the American continents are no longer subjects for any new European colonial establishments.” The tsar's claim was untenable, and he backed down. In April 1824, Russia signed a treaty agreeing to form no settlements on the northwest coast south of 54°40' north latitude, with the United States agreeing to make no settlements north of that line.

The line represented the approximate boundary between Alaska, which was the only part of North America that Russia had colonized extensively, and the Oregon country, to which the United States had a claim by virtue of exploration.

In 1839, the Hudson Bay Company and the Russian American Fur Company signed an accord in which the Russians gave up claim to the Yukon and parts of present day British Columbia.

David
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Felipe II on November 12, 2005, 12:30:38 PM
Dear David,

I think you are right. I found this map yesterday in the internet, it is not my own one. ;D
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: imperial angel on April 12, 2006, 10:51:59 AM
He didn't poison himself, nor would he have. I think he was stressed, strained, and life weary after the Crimean War, as well as getting older, so it's natural he came down with an illness that led to death. I think his attitude may have been rather life weary, but I think that's the extent of it. His death was natural, whatever he was feeling, poisoning himself woudn't have occured to him.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Mihailo on May 21, 2006, 10:01:00 AM
Is there anywhere a photograph of Nicholas I? I have read that there is at least one, but I can't find it anywhere! :'(
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: marina on May 21, 2006, 10:43:24 AM
Hello and welcome!

Well, I think it might be something very rare...
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Svetabel on May 21, 2006, 11:08:48 AM
I've never seen any PHOTO of Nikolay I. As I read this Emperor did not respect photography  :(
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Laura Mabee on May 21, 2006, 12:07:55 PM
You might have better luck looking here (http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/YaBB.cgi?board=othertsars).   :)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: grandduchessella on May 21, 2006, 05:11:46 PM
Here's what it says in Camera and the Tsars:

'The earliest surviving daguerreotypes of the imperial family, taken from life, date from the end of the 1840s. The State Hermitage in St Petersburg owns two: one of Nicholas I and one of his eldest daughter...taken by unknown photographers. There may have been other early photographs which have not survived....Nicholas may not have cared much for photography beyond its novelty value: his interests inclined always to the past. He was also a keen patron of the arts. The miniature watercolour portrait was fashionable in Russia at thsi time and the Tsar was both generous to his artists and knowledgable about their work--he may not have wished to encourage an invention that would threaten their future....The Royal Collection in Windsor holds a daguerreotype of him on his deathbed...'
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Mihailo on May 22, 2006, 09:24:22 AM
Thank you for your responses everyone!
I didn't find the photo on the Hermitage site, so I guess there's no photo of him online... :'(
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: leanora on May 23, 2006, 10:02:49 PM
Hello  :)

You can read this in the introduction of "the camera and the tsars" from Charlotte Zeepvat: "the earliest surviving daguerreotypes of the imperial family taken from life, date from the end of the 1840s. The State Hermitage in St Petersburg owns two: one of Nicholas I and one of his eldest daughter, Grand Princess Maria Nikolaevna, taken by unknow photographers. There may have been other early photographs which have not survived...... But Nicholas may not have cared much for photography beyond its novelty value: his interests inclined always to the past..... Nicholas died in february 1855. The Royal collection in Windsor holds a daguerreotype of him on his deathbed which has deteriorated badly. Its provenance is unknown and it is a curious item to find in this particular collection for, at the time of the tsar's death, England and Russia were at war....."

Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: leanora on May 23, 2006, 10:06:41 PM
sorry granduchesse ella, I had to read all the replies before post :-[
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: RomanovsFan4Ever on June 27, 2009, 08:07:01 AM
He didn't poison himself, nor would he have. I think he was stressed, strained, and life weary after the Crimean War, as well as getting older, so it's natural he came down with an illness that led to death. I think his attitude may have been rather life weary, but I think that's the extent of it. His death was natural, whatever he was feeling, poisoning himself woudn't have occured to him.

Agree with you, I don't believe that he poisoned himself, from what I read his health began to deteriorate some time before his death (as well as the health of Empress Alexandra), and also he was completely demoralized by the tragic news that came from the war in Crimea, if I recall correctly Sevastopol was under siege, and the situation was desperate.
According to historian Henri Troyat, the Tsar stopped to take care about his health, but his death was natural.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Sara Araújo on February 01, 2010, 06:35:38 AM
With his wife Alexandra Feodorovna:
(http://images.orkut.com/orkut/photos/OgAAAL1rr5sqCmffI6uluH3dW_LZ-__bMqFtjYjbnq2KLTfQtx64S6z_9dlg9j7hWX4hFlTk-j4a0KApKC8YPN1U0PgAm1T1UBNF706xH3J4fUSdn2GsY1grakcI.jpg)

Again with his wife and his son Alexander II:

(http://images.orkut.com/orkut/photos/OgAAAL64S3MxwH9AsLLekCdTDaPWRn79rA8wx4T3xCCx-ZalfuwSWI8sff8G6K-c1htzwUdP3EqpCSTGJQSeYj3hJ8sAm1T1UP3O4tWzeIy3XAU7kUH_NcwP6xoR.jpg)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: violetta on October 20, 2010, 08:06:23 AM

(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/026-1.jpg)


the emperor and the empress enter moscow

(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/029-1.jpg)



Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: violetta on October 20, 2010, 08:09:13 AM
coronation of nicholas I is announced publicly on the Red Square

(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/027.jpg)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: violetta on October 20, 2010, 08:17:13 AM
the tzar in a prussian uniform

(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/041.jpg)


the tzar with his son iin law, the duke of leichtenberg

(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/046.jpg)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: violetta on October 22, 2010, 03:47:14 PM
(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/099.jpg)


(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/067.jpg)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: violetta on October 22, 2010, 04:04:34 PM
(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/063.jpg)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Dru on April 04, 2012, 08:14:42 PM
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7227/6900450074_a4b0bd837a.jpg)

Nicholas I on his deathbed, by Hau.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Ally Kumari on January 03, 2015, 10:53:32 AM
(http://f13.ifotki.info/org/6e03589d0e963c2696d46b695ad110c8bc5f6c142059601.jpg)
http://www.liveinternet.ru/users/bo4kameda/post258827741/
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Dru on January 03, 2015, 02:34:43 PM
(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8637/15567767833_41a6f11587_o.jpg)

I am seriously jumping up and down screaming right now!  Nicholas I on his deathbed, with the angels of his daughter Grand Duchess Alexandra Nikolaevna, and his granddaughter Grand Duchess Alexandra Alexandrovna.  By Vladimir Ivanovich Hau, from vk.com.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Ally Kumari on January 04, 2015, 05:54:39 AM
That is indeed a rare image! Also only third picture of Alexandra Alexandrovna I have seen (the other two being her well known portrait and the illustration showing her and her baby brother Niks)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Dru on January 04, 2015, 09:42:10 AM
Also only third picture of Alexandra Alexandrovna I have seen (the other two being her well known portrait and the illustration showing her and her baby brother Niks)

Same for me--I would love to see more!
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Romanov_Fan19 on February 01, 2015, 09:11:13 PM
how tall was he
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: CountessKate on February 02, 2015, 09:08:29 AM
how tall was he

The US diplomat John Motley who was in Russia in 1841 wrote that he thought Nicholas I was "six feet three inches at least in height".
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Maria Sisi on February 02, 2015, 09:34:02 AM
I believe six feet three inches was the average height of the Romanov men in the 19th century. Before that, besides Peter the Great, Romanov men weren't as tall and it was the first Empress Maria Feodorovna (wife of Paul I) who added height to the family.

Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Ally Kumari on December 29, 2015, 01:45:22 PM
The Emperor with his youngest sons

(http://40.media.tumblr.com/f4e4b5706a43c688da75a548fb5a9f0c/tumblr_o00i72kU6z1rh07xwo1_1280.jpg)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Romanov_Fan19 on January 19, 2016, 02:24:16 PM
How is  Tsar  Nicholas I  Related  to the  Prince of Wales
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Превед on January 19, 2016, 02:45:40 PM
How is  Tsar  Nicholas I  Related  to the  Prince of Wales

Emperor Nicholas I was the great great great grandfather of Charles, Prince of Wales, through Prince Philip's grandmother, Queen Olga of Greece, née Grand Duchess Olga Konstantinovna of Russia.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Kalafrana on January 22, 2016, 02:17:53 AM
Msge 49
The long legs are very noticeable - inherited by most of his male descendants.

Ann
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Kalafrana on January 22, 2016, 04:45:51 AM
Msge 49

Not sure what impression the artist was intending to convey, but it does rather look as though Nicholas is giving Nikolai and Mikhail a telling-off.

Ann
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Maria Sisi on January 22, 2016, 11:06:27 AM
Msge 49

Not sure what impression the artist was intending to convey, but it does rather look as though Nicholas is giving Nikolai and Mikhail a telling-off.

Ann

It really does.

I guess if you want to spin it you could say Nicholas I was a strong and strict disciplinary parent who demanded order and obedience from his own children just as he did from his people. He did after all introduce the whole "oath of loyalty" to the Tsar thing that all Grand Dukes had to do when they came of age. 
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Kalafrana on January 22, 2016, 12:37:16 PM
Indeed.

Perhaps he is instructing them on the responsibilities of members of the ruling house.

Ann
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Maria Sisi on January 22, 2016, 05:40:11 PM
If only his sons had passed on those instructions to theirs
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Kalafrana on January 23, 2016, 12:03:02 AM
To be fair, the Nikolaievichi both turned out all right.

Ann
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Kalafrana on January 23, 2016, 12:12:39 AM
To amplify, Nikolai Nikolaievich 1 (son of Nicholas I) clearly didn't listen to paternal advice and turned out badly. However, His elder son, NN2, turned out very well. Peter N was rather lightweight and never did very much, but was someone for the quiet life and didn't cause problems.

Except, of course, that they and their wives introduced Rasputin to Nicholas and Alexandra, though again, to be fair, they realised their mistake later on.

Ann
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on February 04, 2016, 05:48:06 PM
Nicholas I may well have been very upset about his army's poor performance during the Crimean war. In away this should not have surprised anyone. The Russian army of the period was a "parade ground" army. No real field training was carried out. There were soldier who did not even know how to load the muskets and others who had never fired one. Less said about the cavalry the better. for more information read:

"The Russia Army under Nicholas I" J.S. Curtis
Osprey book The Russian army of the Crimean war.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Romanov_Fan19 on May 05, 2016, 05:41:27 PM
Anyone read the Book by  W Bruce Lincoln
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Dru on May 06, 2016, 04:23:10 PM
Anyone read the Book by  W Bruce Lincoln

Yes.  It's pretty good.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: NicolasG on May 07, 2016, 03:12:15 PM
Anyone read the Book by  W Bruce Lincoln

I haven't, but I have read Lincoln's trilogy on the revolution and the civil war (about 1,500 pages) and it is very bad.

"And the Duma's vice-president Aleksandr Protopopov, a politician whose appointment as Russia's last minister of internal affairs Aleksandra insisted "God will bless", was widely believed to be ardent necrophiliac."
W. Bruce Lincoln, Passage through Armageddon, pag. 276

What are the odds of that being true? 1 in a billion? 1 in a trillion?

That's Lincoln's style. I don't like it.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Ally Kumari on June 17, 2016, 01:47:29 PM
(http://67.media.tumblr.com/2be0e090ce5698ef60bc0acf3acab7fd/tumblr_o8gs9gBaOI1rh07xwo1_1280.jpg)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Joanna on July 22, 2016, 10:06:33 AM
Nichols & Plincke [Николсу и Плинке] – ‘The English Shop’
5% Discount for the Emperor!

https://winterpalaceresearch.blogspot.ca/2016/07/nichols-plincke-english-shop.html

Joanna
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Joanna on September 21, 2016, 02:54:46 PM
Nicholas I's Cabinet on the 3rd Floor of the Winter Palace

https://winterpalaceresearch.blogspot.ca/2016/09/nicholas-is-cabinet-on-3rd-floor-of.html

Joanna
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Ally Kumari on March 04, 2017, 02:29:42 AM
(https://pp.userapi.com/c636317/v636317105/57399/VF6bWDAcZq0.jpg)
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Joanna on May 17, 2017, 11:04:09 AM
Nicholas l Breaks Collarbone on the Winter Palace Stairs

https://winterpalaceresearch.blogspot.ca/2017/05/nicholas-l-breaks-collarbone-on-winter.html

Joanna
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Dru on August 14, 2017, 07:01:02 PM
http://adini-nikolaevna.tumblr.com/image/164151198675 (http://adini-nikolaevna.tumblr.com/image/164151198675)

Nicholas I and Alexandra Feodorovna.
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Joanna on November 04, 2017, 10:10:00 AM
Classical profiles of an emperor, empress and grand duchess

http://winterpalaceresearch.blogspot.ca/2017/11/profile-of-grand-duchess-maria.html

Joanna
Title: Re: Emperor Nicholas I
Post by: Joanna on December 13, 2017, 10:32:18 AM
Emperor Nicholas in a bus on the main street – Nevsky Prospekt – in Saint Petersburg!

Emperor Nicholas’ apology on a bus!
http://winterpalaceresearch.blogspot.ca/2017/12/emperor-nicholas-apology-on-bus.html

Joanna