Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => Rulers Prior to Nicholas II => Topic started by: madame_chauchat on June 08, 2005, 04:46:41 AM

Title: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: madame_chauchat on June 08, 2005, 04:46:41 AM
I would like to say hallo to all of you. Im new here, and thats my first thread.   :)

I'm wondering what really happened between Anna Feodorovna (aunt of QV) and grand duke Constantine. Why did she left him? Was his raw character the only reason?

It's hard to find any information.

???
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Prince_Christopher on July 03, 2005, 05:04:17 PM
I've often wondered about her as well, another Coburg relation who made what seemed to be a great marriage.  I know Prince Albert corresponded with her and visited her, I think she returned to Coburg after her divorce.  

Juliana (her given name) was only about 15 when she married Constantine and he was only about 17 himself, they were both very young, even by the standards of the day.  They married in 1796 and divorced in 1820, so maybe it had to do with the fact she had no children, I don't know.

However, Grand Duke Constantine remarried the same year he divorced Juliana (Anna Feodorovna), to Joanna Grudna-Grudzinski, Princess Lowicz.  Maybe Constantine was casting an aging, barren wife aside for a fresher bride?
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: umigon on July 04, 2005, 06:02:10 AM
Well, in fact, when they were divorced in 1820 they had already been separated for almost a decade. Juliana had a relationship between 1806 and 1810 with Jules Gabriel Emile de Seigneux (1768-1834), with whom she had an illegitimate son: Eduard Edgar von Löwenfels (1808-1892).

She then started a new affair with Rodolphe Abraham de Schiferli (1775-1837), with whom she had a daughter: Louise Milda Agnes de Schiferli (1812-1837).


Both of Juliana's illegitimate children left issue.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Prince_Christopher on July 04, 2005, 11:00:09 AM
That's interesting, Umigon.  I'd never heard of this, in fact very little on Juliana.  What kind of person was she? did she raise her children herself? Who did her children marry?  I wonder what QV and PA thought about their aunt?
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: umigon on July 04, 2005, 11:17:54 AM

Juliana was willing to get her divorce as much as Konstantin was (he also had an illegitimate son during their marriage). I don't know if she raised her children, but in her last years she was quite close to Eduard).


Eduard was much closer than many think to Prince Albert, they were not only cousins, but also brothers-in-law, as Eduard married Berta Ernestine von Schauenstein (1817-1896), who was an illegitimate daughter of Duke Ernest I of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha and Sophie Fermepin de Marteaux. They had five children together:

1. Moritz (d. young)

2. Sophie (1836-1920). With issue.

3. Emma (1838-1905). With issue.

4. Ernst (1843-1921). With issue.

5. Albert (1848-1870). Childless.


Juliana's daughter, Louisa, married Jean Samuel Edouard Dapples (+1887), with whom she had at least three children. I don't know their names nor if they left any issue.

Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: cimbrio on July 18, 2005, 09:04:55 AM
Princess Julianne (aka Anna Feodorvna) helped to found the Russian Orthodox which can be found in the Vieille Ville of Geneva (Switzerland) which I've visited often. I've also found a good (but expensive) bio on her here in Geneva, but I haven't bought it... I'm chewing on it ;) She must have been very linked to Russians in Switzerland... I know that the afct that GD Konstantin Nikolaievich divorced her made Queen Victoria mistrust Russians, and I think I've read that Queen Victoria hated Russians as much as she did Prussians...
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: sisterx on September 13, 2005, 09:26:37 AM
Hello All

I'm also new here, but when I found your threat I decided to enter Alexander Palace for answering your questions. I'm garden historien in Switzerland and I'm researching about the garden of Anna Feodorowna

Anna Feodorowna escaped from Russia 1801 to Coburg, after the murder of Paul I. Her husband Duke Constantin is described as a cruel and sadistic person. So she suffered a long time. Between 1805-1810 she had an affair with Jules Gabriel Emile de Seigneux (he was married with Christiane Friederike von Anhalt and divorced 1805). The first child Eduard seems to be their love-child.

Konstantin wanted to get divorced early (to marry Princess Czertwertinska) but his mother was against it to save the reputation of the Russian Court. So Konstantin travelled to Berne 1818 to visit Anna. Also the Car of Russia travelled anonymous through Switzerland 1814.

1810 Rudolf von Schiferli, Swiss medicine and lord stuart of Anna went to Coburg. They became friends and lovers, so Anna get second child, a daughter called Louise Hilda Agnes. The following yearshe moved with him back to Switzerland. There she bought a mansion, called Elfenau and built a landscape garden during the years between 1814-1825. The plan was created by the royal landskip gardener Joseph Bernand Baumann from Alsace / France, he was connected with Coburg, but I don't know how.

After the death of Schiferli and their daughter at the same year she travelled to Geneva. Any month before death she came "home" to Elfenau, where she died 1860. Her son inherited Elfenau but sold it immetiately.

There are some books about Anna Feodorowna, written in French by Swiss Author Alville (Alix de Watteville). She wrote about her mansion Elfenau, about her Swiss years and about the visitors at Elfenau. You can find it at any library searching tool.

Des cours princières aux demeures helvétiques / Alville 1962
Die Schweizerjahre der Grossfürstin Anna Feodorowna von Russland / Alville 1947 (shortened translation of: )
La vie en Suisse de S.A.I. la grande-duchesse Anna Feodorovna, née princesse de Saxe-Cobourg-Saalfeld / Alville 1943

Don't pay too much for it, you can buy it around 30-50 Swiss Franks at www.ZVAB.com

Greetings
SisterX

Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Prince_Christopher on September 15, 2005, 06:36:04 PM
Thank you, SisterX, and welcome to the forum!

What an informative post!  I just learned more about Juliana than I ever had before!

I was recently reading some of the earlier letters of QV, and in one she writes to King Leopold about Juliana.  Apparently, QV had gone to Belgium for a visit, and while there, she met her Aunt Juliana for the first time, who was sick and staying with Leopold.  She seems to have made a favorable impression on Victoria, as she inquired into her health and well-being in the next several letters.  At this time, Victoria was already grown and married.  I guess growing up, she (Victoria) was cut off from most of her Coburg relatives.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Prince_Christopher on September 15, 2005, 06:37:28 PM
SisterX,
Do you know if she raised her children herself, or pawned them off on someone else?
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: sisterx on September 21, 2005, 07:23:15 AM
Hello all

Thank you for your kind compliments. Searching for more information I found the following link. It describes the marriage life between Constantine and Anna and helps you to find out the places where her children grew up:

"Constantine and Juliane, or Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna, did not get on very well. Constantine was licentious, had many affairs and was described as "rude, impossible, totally lacking in tact".
According to a sister-in-law, Constantine was "an ugly caricature of his father". The Russian nobles detested him as he was ruthless and a rigid disciplinarian.
After only about five years, Grand Duchess Anna left Constantine and a few years after that, in 1808, gave birth to a son (Eduard von Loewenfels) fathered by Constantine's brother, Emperor Alexander I. But I know that Eduard lived in Elfenau at the age of 18 years, because I've seen some of his early-sketches, however.
Just as his estranged wife had given birth to an illegitimate child, he, too, fathered an illegitimate son in the same year. However, even after Grand Duchess Anna had left for Europe, they would
meet regularly and there was even talk of a reconciliation; but finally they would divorce in 1820."



Hilda was adopted by a french refugee, living in Switzerland. He's called Jean François Joseph d'Aubert. Hildas official name was Hilda d'Aubert.  I think she was grown up in Switzerland but I cannot find anything about the step-father. The father of the groom Eduard Dapples was a medicine, so maybe Schiferli and Dapples were connected, but thats all guesswork. =)

Greetings from Switzerland.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: thijs on September 21, 2005, 01:02:59 PM
I read somewhere that Constantine was really crazy and sadistic like his father. He put Juliane (anna) on one occassion in a huge China vase and then shot at the vase. Cruelty was in the family: Paul l had also his strange customs.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: crazy_wing on September 21, 2005, 03:57:52 PM
Quote
I read somewhere that Constantine was really crazy and sadistic like his father. He put Juliane (anna) on one occassion in a huge China vase and then shot at the vase. Cruelty was in the family: Paul l had also his strange customs.


At least Paul wasn't that cruel!  
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Daniela on September 22, 2005, 04:15:18 AM
Quote
He put Juliane (anna) on one occassion in a huge China vase and then shot at the vase.


Did he realy, realy did that!? :o

Then five years being with him, it was realy to much!!!

Daniela
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Svetabel on September 22, 2005, 07:00:46 AM
Quote
I read somewhere that Constantine was really crazy and sadistic like his father. He put Juliane (anna) on one occassion in a huge China vase and then shot at the vase. Cruelty was in the family: Paul l had also his strange customs.


Konstantin was really not a lovely and easy-going person but I believe the story about the vase is just a conjecture.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: sisterx on September 22, 2005, 11:23:21 AM
hello together

I found in a letter from 1820, that Rudolf von Schiferli was married, but not with Anna Feodorowna. So their relationship in Switzerland was not as a couple, I guess to avoid rumours. The fact that people found out that Anna Feodorowna and Schiferli had a child, was a result of reading their letters later. So it was a secret in Berne, that they had a relationship in Coburg.

No romantic shelter in sweet-sweet Switzerland.
=)

Best wishes.
SisterX
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Marc on September 22, 2005, 11:38:15 AM
(http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a42/breezer22/JulianeCoburg.jpg)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Marc on September 22, 2005, 11:40:35 AM
Portrait of Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna!
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: gem_10 on September 05, 2007, 08:55:51 AM
I'm reviving this old thread.  :)

I'm always interested with Anna Feodorovna. What was her relationship with the other members of the Imperial Family? She and Elizabeth Alexeievna have the same age and they were married almost at the same time. Plus, their husbands were closed to each other, so I wonder if the two women get along with each other well.

Anyone has an opinion?
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: ivanushka on September 05, 2007, 07:20:52 PM
I've often wondered that too (whether Anna and Elizabeth were close).  I'd imagine that would have been, bearing in mind that both were a similar age, both were German and both had come from minor states to the grand and intimidating Russian court.  I'd also imagine that Elizabeth would have wanted a friend as originally her sister Frederika (the future wife of Gustavus IV of Sweden) had come with her to St Petersburg as a possible wife for Constantine but for some reason (perhaps her youth as she was only about 12) she was sent back to Baden.  Elizabeth must have been lonely without her.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: gem_10 on September 05, 2007, 07:54:49 PM
I agree with you ivanushka. They must've been intimidated with the Russian court and the intrigues surrounding it. Elizabeth was very beautiful but shy and reserved by nature. And it was said that Anna, while not exactly stunningly beautiful like her sister-in-law, was pretty and full of life. But do you have any info or idea what kind of personality Anna has?

I'm also looking for her portraits when she was still a grand duchess but I've only seen 2 so far: the one by Le Brun and the one from the Hermitage.

Anyone can kindly post?
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: ivanushka on September 06, 2007, 08:52:02 AM
I think the description "pretty and full of life" is very accurate.  That is certainly the impression one gets when looking at the Le Brun portrait.

I don't know much about her character but I would imagine that she was a stronger personality than her sister in law, Elizabeth.  Anna's mother (a very minor German princess who married a very minor German prince!) was, by all accounts, an intensely ambitious woman who was determined that her children would marry as well as possible.  One of Anna's sisters married a son of George III and was the mother of Queen Victoria while one of her brothers firstly married George IV's only daughter, Charlotte, and, then after she died, ended up as King of Belgium. 

Anna's mother must have been thrilled that her daughter had married the son of a Tsar but according to Wikipedia Anna returned to Coburg after only a few years of marriage because she found Constantine so unpleasant.  It must have taken guts to do that as mother must have been livid!!!

Her life after leaving Russia was colourful too.  You get the impression of a likeable and confident woman who enjoyed life and was probably fun to be around.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: gem_10 on September 06, 2007, 09:46:19 PM
I very much agree that Anna had a stronger personality than Elizabeth. Her Coburg relatives have strong personality too (e.g. Victoria of kent). But the way she was treated by Konstantin must have hurt her so much. And I imagine no one in the imperial family actually sympathized with her (except maybe Elizabeth).

It seems that Anna's sad life in Russia made a deep impression on Queen Victoria. She came to strongly dislike Russia and the imperial family.  :)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Svetabel on September 07, 2007, 12:27:30 AM
One more picture of Anna Fedorovna

http://www.museum.ru/1812/persons/Romanov/anna_fed.html (http://www.museum.ru/1812/persons/Romanov/anna_fed.html)

Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: ivanushka on September 09, 2007, 08:49:11 AM
I very much agree that Anna had a stronger personality than Elizabeth. Her Coburg relatives have strong personality too (e.g. Victoria of kent). But the way she was treated by Konstantin must have hurt her so much. And I imagine no one in the imperial family actually sympathized with her (except maybe Elizabeth).

It seems that Anna's sad life in Russia made a deep impression on Queen Victoria. She came to strongly dislike Russia and the imperial family.  :)

Yes, I'd read that Queen Victoria didn't like Russia, though I hadn't made the connection with Anna being her aunt.  It's ironic, isn't it, that one of Queen Victoria's favourite grandchildren ended up as the last Tsarina!

In a book called Royal Babylon, Karl Shaw says that Anna's brother Ernst (the future Duke of Coburg and father of Prince Albert) and Constantine were good friends and that it was said that they used to amuse themselves by kicking hussars to death and firing live rats from cannons in the Marble Palace.  Certainly Constantine seems a very unpleasant person and he may well have been physically abusive to his wife.

Apparently Bismarck referred to the Saxe Coburg family as the stud farm of Europe.  Another of Anna's brothers was the father of a future King consort of Portugal, and one of his grandsons managed to get himself elected as King of Bulgaria!!!
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: dmitri on September 09, 2007, 12:32:34 PM
I guess it takes all sorts to make up a family. Check out Leopold II of Belgium. He was not the most pleasant Coburg first cousin of Queen Victoria. He treated his long suffering wife very poorly.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: gem_10 on September 10, 2007, 12:40:52 AM

Certainly Constantine seems a very unpleasant person and he may well have been physically abusive to his wife.



That is very likely. Constantine was known for his cruelty and not-so-good personality. But I'm surprised that he was kind and caring towards his sister-in-law, Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna, who is unhappily married to his brother Mikhail.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: CountessKate on September 10, 2007, 05:15:03 AM
In 'Romanov relations', the letters between Anna Pavlovna of the Netherlands and her brothers, there is the occasional letter from Constantine who sounded actually quite nice.  He certainly sympathised with Elena Pavlovna as Ivanushka says, and he was very fond of his second wife and their child, from his letters, and there was never any suggestion that he was horrible to them.  However, he was married very young and it sounds as if he could be a bit of a bully, so his relations with his first wife clearly suffered from his immaturity (and, in fairness, hers also).  The fact that they didn't have any children probably made it less of a problem to separate.  It is interesting that a lot of pressure was put on Elena Pavlovna to stay with the odious Michael, but comparatively little seems to have been put on Julie, at least once Paul died. 
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: gem_10 on September 10, 2007, 06:10:47 AM
I imagine that Constantine became 'nicer' as he grows older. He was very young when he was married to Juliane. To top it all, it was an aranged marriage and at that time, Constantine might still be enjoying his happy-go-lucky life as an unmarried young man. He must've hated it to be tied down in a loveless marriage.

Constantine indeed loved his second wife. He was more than willing to give up his right on the throne just to marry her.  ;) He likes Elena Pavlovna because of her strong personality and tries to help her with her relationship with Mikhail (at least in the beginning of their married life).  :)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: ivanushka on September 10, 2007, 11:01:37 AM
In 'Romanov relations', the letters between Anna Pavlovna of the Netherlands and her brothers, there is the occasional letter from Constantine who sounded actually quite nice.  He certainly sympathised with Elena Pavlovna as Ivanushka says, and he was very fond of his second wife and their child, from his letters, and there was never any suggestion that he was horrible to them.  However, he was married very young and it sounds as if he could be a bit of a bully, so his relations with his first wife clearly suffered from his immaturity (and, in fairness, hers also).  The fact that they didn't have any children probably made it less of a problem to separate.  It is interesting that a lot of pressure was put on Elena Pavlovna to stay with the odious Michael, but comparatively little seems to have been put on Julie, at least once Paul died. 

Do you know who published "Romanov Relations"?  It sounds like a fascinating book and one that I'd enjoy reading.

It was said that of all Tsar Paul's son, Constantine was most like him both in looks and in personality.  I've heard that though Paul could be difficult to put it mildly, he was always an affectionate father to his younger children.  I imagine his relationship with his two eldest sons must have been soured by the fact that they were both taken out of the care of him and his wife and raised by Catherine the Great.  I would imagine that like his father, Constantine did have a nice side and, as gem suggests, this became more to the fore as he matured. 

It must have been quite difficult for Constantine being the younger brother to Alexander who was very much the golden boy of the family.  Though I think that both brothers were very close Constantine must have felt overshadowed by Alexander and this could have contributed to his less acceptable behavior when younger.

Sorry, getting off point here.  I know this is a thread about Anna!  I just find the whole Romanov family relationships issue fascinating!
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: gem_10 on September 10, 2007, 08:04:10 PM
They are indeed fascinating ivanushka! Especially the family of Paul I. I'm always interested with their relationship with each other and also with that of their in-laws (eg. daughter-in-laws and son-in-laws). Not so many was written about them, and this only makes them more fascinating.

Anyways, back to Anna Feodorovna.  :)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Alexandrina-Sofia on October 02, 2008, 05:15:47 AM
Good day!
I search portrait of Auguste Gfn Reuss zu Ebersdorf. She was a mother of GDss Anna Feodorovna.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: CountessKate on October 02, 2008, 09:41:53 AM
Quote
Do you know who published "Romanov Relations"?  It sounds like a fascinating book and one that I'd enjoy reading.

Romanov Relations: The Private Correspondence of Tsars Alexander I, Nicholas I and the Grand Dukes Constantine and Michael with Their Sister Queen Anna Pavlovna, 1817-1855; Edited By S.W. Jackman; Assisted By Berangere Steel London. Macmillan 1969.

S W Jackman made rather a specialty of Romanov-Dutch royalty and edited the letters of Anna Pavlovna and her mother (Chere Annette: Letters from Russia 1820-1828) and the letters of Queen Sophie of the Netherlands and Lady Malet (A Stranger in the Hague: The Letters of Queen Sophie of the Netherlands to Lady Malet, 1842-77).  I found 'Romanov Relations' the most interesting although Anna Pavlovna showsa really nasty attitude to her daughter-in-law/niece; however, Sophie loathed her mother-in-law/aunt almost equally so it was perfectly mutual.  Constantine as I said, comes out rather well from the letters, but there is no reference to his first wife.  Anna Pavlovna would have been just 4 when he and Julianne separated for the first time, and she returned to Russia briefly in 1801 when Anna was 6, so she would hardly have remembered her or had much to do with her. 

Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Alexandrina-Sofia on February 22, 2009, 01:27:32 AM
Portrait of GDss Anna Feodorovna by Winterhalter, 1848

http://entertainment.webshots.com/photo/2991279770061759156fKZOED
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on March 24, 2009, 07:28:13 AM
Here is polish wikipedia where you can find a picture of Joanna Grudzinska, the princess of Lowicz


http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joanna_Grudzi%C5%84ska


plus some other pictures, the text is in polish but there are pictures of her

http://www.zgapa.pl/zgapedia/Joanna_Grudzi%C5%84ska.html
http://www.polskiedzieje.pl/galeria-historyczna/obraz-duzy-447

something in Russian
http://www.liveinternet.ru/users/2010239/post67289359/
http://marinazen.livejournal.com/305121.html?thread=1520353 ( a family album of pavel I, in fact)


Someone asked about relation between elizaveta alexeevna and anna fedorovna and I`m ready to tell you. EA instantly took to the Coburgs (the 3 girls came with their mother), she even envied the girls that they were allowed to come with their mother because EA ahd to arrive at S Petersburg at 13, without her mother, only with her younger sister Frederique (Frick) who I believe bacame the Swedish queen (she married the prince who was supposed to marry Alexandra Pavlovna but the engagement did not come through due to Catherine II`s wish thta her daughter was to remain Orthodox). Not only did EA like AF but she became a sort of mentor for her because she in a sense paved the way for AF. While EA and her husband had a certain bond at least at the beginning of their marriage, Ann`s marriage was a failurre from the very beginning so the two of them spent a lot of time together sharing common fate. EA must have felt a need to take care of someone (she desperately wanted to give birth to the heir) she started to take care of AF, she somehow helped her to navigate at court. In her letters to her mother EA calls her friend at "dear giel' or a charming child". When Pavel I  ascended the throne, both Konstantin and Alexander had to paticipate in military maneouvres so both young women stayed together, they also comforted each other when Pavel`s fits of rage were unbearable. I guess EA might have regretted that AF came back to her parents as she lost one of her few friends
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: CountessKate on March 24, 2009, 08:17:33 AM
Quote
her younger sister Frederique (Frick) who I believe bacame the Swedish queen (she married the prince who was supposed to marry Alexandra Pavlovna but the engagement did not come through due to Catherine II`s wish thta her daughter was to remain Orthodox).

Her older sister Sophie Fredericke married Emanuel, Count Mensdorff Pouilly while another sister Victoire married Emich Prince of Leiningen and subsequently Edward Duke of Kent, and yet another sister Antoinette married Alexander of Wurttemburg.  Gustav IV Adolph of Sweden married Fredericke Dorothea of Baden
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on March 24, 2009, 12:28:17 PM
thanks for correcting me CountessKate! But the rest of info on AF is true ;) ;) I`ve just checked the book that is on Elizaveta Alexeevna, in fact ;)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: CountessKate on March 24, 2009, 03:29:59 PM
I'm sure it is, Violetta, it would be strange if two young women in such very similar circumstances didn't bond.  But it is interesting to think of what would have happened if Anna had born a son to Constantine who lived - might Elizabeth have felt more or less pressure on her own position?  Presumably a divorce between Anna and Constantine would have been out of the question, and would Constantine have given up the throne?  Fascinating to speculate.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on March 24, 2009, 05:23:16 PM
I know that the IF sent envoy were sent to Anna to persuade her to come back She was even tempted by the Imperial crown. as we know A I and Elizaveta were childless (their 2 daughter died childless) Constantine was he heir to the throne, but even the crown didn`t prsuade her to come back. in 1815 ,after the vienna congress, constantine was appointed commaner-in chief of the Polish army and went to Warsaw. But in fact he was the ruler of the Polish Kingdom. In autumn 1815 he met Joanna Grudzinska at a ball and fallin love with her. Joanna was a polish aristocrat but the title of the princess was granted to the Grudzinskis in the 1790s . The family came from Poznan, or ,to be precise, not far from Poznan ( also known as Pozen). He started visiting her family and decided that divorce was necesary. It took 4 years to persuade the Dowager Impress to give permission to the marriage. for her, divorcr meant that a member of the IF didn`t respect the sanctity of conjugal ties. what is more, the Russians could have the same impression. the point is that during church services a priest named all the mebers of the IF  and asked to pray for them,in case of divorce ANNA`s name wouldn`t be mentioned so accoding to mariya fedorovna" every russian peasant in a provincial village would doubt whether the member of the IF neglected the sanctity of conjugal ties, that would undermine the authority of the IF"9quote from memory, read it in NIKOLAY I by Shilder, published more than 100 years ago). when it became clear that ANNA wouldn`t come back mariya fedorovna agreed for the divorce under the condition that he wpould choose another German princess. but constantine persevered and finally received the permission renouncing his rights to the throne.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Lacuspapa on July 03, 2009, 01:51:57 AM
Dear all, I need information about La Grande Duchesse Anna Feodorovna (born Princess Juliane Henriette Ulrike of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld) what she did after she returned to Coburg in 1799 and went back to and left Sank Petersburg again in 1801.
Thank you all.
 
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Svetabel on July 04, 2009, 12:34:41 PM
Dear all, I need information about La Grande Duchesse Anna Feodorovna (born Princess Juliane Henriette Ulrike of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld) what she did after she returned to Coburg in 1799 and went back to and left Sank Petersburg again in 1801.
Thank you all.
 

Anna Fedorovna returned to Coburg in 1799 with the thought that she would never be back to Russia, she pointed out her wish to divorce, but her family and the family of Pavel I were strictly opposite the divorce and she was forced to left for St-Petersburg in the same 1799 year for the wedding of GDss Elena Pavlovna, sister of GD Konstantin.
In 1801, after Pavel's death, Anna left for Coburg and never saw Russia again. Till 1813 year she was wandering about Germany, living mostly in native Coburg, gave birth to 2 illegetimate children from different fathers. In 1813 she was given a permission to settle in Switzerland where she bought mansion and lived for the rest of her life.
In 1814 GD Konstantin suddenly surfaced at her door with a sweet offer to return to him and to Russia, as his brother didn't have male offsprings and they together could be the future Emperor and Empress. Anna, who had been used for her quiet and independent life, was shocked and after some hesitating flatly refused. Konstantin was furious (he definitely didn't want to live with her but his brother ordered him to go to Anna and speak about re-union), Anna's brother Leopold (future King of Belgium) tried to convince sister to think twice about the situation but Anna was adamant. No return to Russia...

Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Svetabel on July 04, 2009, 12:54:32 PM
In 1820 Anna Fedorovna and GD Konstantin were divorced. All her years out of Russia she had been received money (rent) for living from the Russian Imperial Court. Even after the divorce she was not refused in Russian money, and she was able to live properly though not in luxury certainly.

She was not an outcast at the European Courts, in general her peers felt sorry for her unfortunate Russian marriage and recieved her with grace. It's interesting that in 1832 her son Eduard Levenfels (born in 1809, from Anna's love affair with her chamberlain ) married his cousin Bertha, illegetimate daughter of Duke Ernst of Coburg, brother of Anna : ) . In 1837 Anna lost her daughter Hilda, who was born in 1812, a child of affair with her new chamberlain...The rest of her life former GDss lived in Switzerland, died there in 1860 and was buried at the Rosengarten cemetery in Bern. Her tombstone was very simple, with inscription : "Julia - Anna".


Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Lacuspapa on September 10, 2009, 10:11:25 AM
Thank you, SisterX, and welcome to the forum!

What an informative post!  I just learned more about Juliana than I ever had before!

I was recently reading some of the earlier letters of QV, and in one she writes to King Leopold about Juliana.  Apparently, QV had gone to Belgium for a visit, and while there, she met her Aunt Juliana for the first time, who was sick and staying with Leopold.  She seems to have made a favorable impression on Victoria, as she inquired into her health and well-being in the next several letters.  At this time, Victoria was already grown and married.  I guess growing up, she (Victoria) was cut off from most of her Coburg relatives.

Christopher, do you konow the date when QV met Juliane in Belgium? Please inform me. thanks
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Svetabel on September 24, 2009, 01:07:46 AM
Thank you, SisterX, and welcome to the forum!

What an informative post!  I just learned more about Juliana than I ever had before!

I was recently reading some of the earlier letters of QV, and in one she writes to King Leopold about Juliana.  Apparently, QV had gone to Belgium for a visit, and while there, she met her Aunt Juliana for the first time, who was sick and staying with Leopold.  She seems to have made a favorable impression on Victoria, as she inquired into her health and well-being in the next several letters.  At this time, Victoria was already grown and married.  I guess growing up, she (Victoria) was cut off from most of her Coburg relatives.

Christopher, do you konow the date when QV met Juliane in Belgium? Please inform me. thanks

I've read a Russian bio on Anna Fedorovna and there was only a mention that Duchess Victoria of Kent with her daughter (future QV) visited Juliana in her Switzerland home.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on September 28, 2009, 02:15:41 PM
Letters of the Empress Elizaveta Alexeevna to her mother contain information on the arrival of Juliana of Saxe-Coburg at St.Petersburg

1.25/09 - 6/10 / 1795 We are expecting the arrival of the princess of Coburg with her daughters...they are so lucky to come with their mother ! (elizaveta came without her mother, no member of her family was present at her wedding either)

2. 9-20.10.1795

The princess if Coburg has arrived at last!...The princess is not pretty at all,she is 38 but she looks 50. The eldest daughter Sophia is pretty but her mouth is unpleasant.she has dark hair, black eyes and very fair complexion. the second daughter, antoinette, is blond, and she is less pretty than sophia. the third girl-julia-is the most attractive, she looks mischievous, she also has beautiful eyes.we met yesterday, and i had the impression that we had known each other for at least  weeks. we spoke german and we talked about germany. constantine was making a choice for the 3 days, and julia is staying here. all the three girls and their mother are absolutely great. grand duke is in love and very satisfied.it is so funnu to watch them - they`re in love and they do stupid  and funny things.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on September 28, 2009, 02:34:36 PM
30.10-10.11/1795
 the princess of coburg has left.Oh,my God! her departure reminded me of our parting three years ago.when the princess hugged julia for the first time i bacame frightened, i had an impression that it was all going on with me.then the mother came up to me and kissed me.i took julia by her hand...julia is a wonderful child:kind,polite, sincere, she is the best friend i could have ever dreamt of. ..she hasn`t kissed the grand duke yet.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: CountessKate on September 29, 2009, 07:07:50 AM
It was really ridiculous to expect these really young people - Juliane 13 and Constantine 15 - to fall genuinely in love and have a genuine relationship without any real knowledge of what they were getting into.  Naturally Constantine, not the most mature boy, picked the prettiest and liveliest sister, and no doubt Juliane was flattered to be chosen and take a high place at court.  The Empress Catherine had a dreadful mixture of sentimentality and ruthlessness in her desire to get the two heirs to the throne married off and producing offspring, and at the same time sighing over how much in love the couples were.  No wonder it all ended in tears, though at least Alexander and Elizabeth managed to come to a good understanding before he died.  No such luck for Constantine and Juliane/Anna, sadly.

Violetta, these are fascinating letters - where do they come from?
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on September 29, 2009, 07:27:20 AM
they come from a book by Larisa Vasilyeva ZHENA I MUZA ( a wife and a muse) dealing with Elizaveta Alexeevna both as a spouse of Alexander I and Pushkin`s muse. The book is based mainly on her letters to her mother, Amelia of Baden, nee Hesse-Darmstadt. The first part is about Elizaveta Alexeevna as a Tsaritsa - a fascinating story of a young girl who turned into a fascinating, intelligent, sensitive, sensible woman, a patron of fine arts and literature. she longed for love so much!  the second part deals with elizaveta alexeevna as a muse of alexander pushkin, the author claims that she was the only great love of pushkin but she has no evidence,only assumptions based on her own speculations.so personally i don`t believe in these assumptions.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: ivanushka on September 29, 2009, 10:21:55 AM
Violetta, thank you so much for posting the extracts from Elizabeth's letters.  I found them absolutely fascinating.  It's also extraordinary that when Elizabeth/Louise and her sister Frederika first came to St Petersburg they came without their mother.  They were only 13 and 11 at the time!  How frightening it must have been for them. 

I'm glad that Elizabeth and Juliana hit it off so well.  It's a shame Juliana didn't stay longer in Russia, but then, Constantine does sound like a nightmare as a husband!
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on September 29, 2009, 11:00:11 AM
Violetta, thank you so much for posting the extracts from Elizabeth's letters.  I found them absolutely fascinating.  It's also extraordinary that when Elizabeth/Louise and her sister Frederika first came to St Petersburg they came without their mother.  They were only 13 and 11 at the time!  How frightening it must have been for them. 

I'm glad that Elizabeth and Juliana hit it off so well.  It's a shame Juliana didn't stay longer in Russia, but then, Constantine does sound like a nightmare as a husband!

in fact, it was catherine II who openly ordered her envoy to take the baden girls WITHOUT their mother. it was done on purpose, in accordance with catherine`s requirements. no member of the baden family was present either at the engagement or at the wedding ceremony
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: CountessKate on September 29, 2009, 11:24:18 AM
Quote
in fact, it was catherine II who openly ordered her envoy to take the baden girls WITHOUT their mother. it was done on purpose, in accordance with catherine`s requirements. no member of the baden family was present either at the engagement or at the wedding ceremony

The Grand Duchess of Baden was born Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt, the sister of Wilhelmina who had been the Grand Duke Paul's first wife.  It might have been thought embarassing if she had come along, as Wilhelmina had died under something of a cloud, and Catherine had done her best to encourage her son to forget his first wife by blackening her name.  She wouldn't want Amelie there to remind her of an uncomfortable time for the family.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Janet Ashton on October 02, 2009, 01:15:54 PM
  It's a shame Juliana didn't stay longer in Russia, but then, Constantine does sound like a nightmare as a husband!

To be fair, he was perfectly decent husband to his second wife, and also a kindly and sensitive elder brother (and loyal younger one). At the time of his marriage to Anna he was far too young - as was she. There was a period of rapprochement mid-marriage when they got on well, but because of this he was blamed for "coarsening" her by those at court (apparently because she associated with his army friends). As K was criticized by men for being rough, so Anna was effectively called an airhead by older women....
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on October 02, 2009, 02:29:26 PM
  It's a shame Juliana didn't stay longer in Russia, but then, Constantine does sound like a nightmare as a husband!
udzinsk
To be fair, he was perfectly decent husband to his second wife, and also a kindly and sensitive elder brother (and loyal younger one). At the time of his marriage to Anna he was far too young - as was she. There was a period of rapprochement mid-marriage when they got on well, but because of this he was blamed for "coarsening" her by those at court (apparently because she associated with his army friends). As K was criticized by men for being rough, so Anna was effectively called an airhead by older women....


yes,he was a decent husband for joanna grudzinska. countess lovitch wrote that "in belweder palace today looks like yesterday, yesterday like the day before yesterday and pray god i`d like this situation to continue forever". it took contantine 4 years to get permission to marry grudzinska because the dowager empress maria feodorovna didn`t want a divorce in her family. besides,grudzinska wasn`t equal by birth so maria feodorovna wanted him to marry another german princess. constantine and joanna grudzinska DID love each other
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on March 24, 2010, 01:42:02 PM
a few portraits of constantine pavlovich from national digital archives

(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/konstantin-pavlovic1.jpg) (http://s719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/?action=view&current=konstantin-pavlovic1.jpg)

(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/konstantin-pavlovic2.jpg) (http://s719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/?action=view&current=konstantin-pavlovic2.jpg)

Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on October 17, 2010, 01:31:43 PM
anna feodorovna

(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/127.jpg)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on November 05, 2010, 11:28:16 AM
Anna Feodorovna was Queen Victoria`a aunt. But how were related? I mean was she related through her mother, the Duchess of Kent?
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: CountessKate on November 05, 2010, 11:38:46 AM
Yes, Anna (born Julianne) was the 3rd child and 3rd daughter of Franz Frederick Anton, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld and his wife Augusta Gräfin Reuss zu Ebersdorf - her sister Victoria, the Duchess of Kent, was the 7th child and 4th daughter, 5 years younger.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: violetta on November 05, 2010, 01:28:58 PM
Yes, Anna (born Julianne) was the 3rd child and 3rd daughter of Franz Frederick Anton, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld and his wife Augusta Gräfin Reuss zu Ebersdorf - her sister Victoria, the Duchess of Kent, was the 7th child and 4th daughter, 5 years younger.


thanks a lot!
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Hector on November 08, 2010, 07:40:31 PM
Photograph of the Duchess of Kent circa 1860
(http://cache1.asset-cache.net/xc/3299250.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=45B0EB3381F7834D50002F0DAF2265932B050E3D81641DE1207CAAE8C4C94190) (http://www.gettyimages.ca/detail/3299250)

No doubt it wasn't the sole factor, but didn't the experiences of Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna have an influence on how negatively her niece, Queen Victoria, would regard the Romanov dynasty and its Russian Empire?
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: CountessKate on November 09, 2010, 05:43:20 AM
Quote
No doubt it wasn't the sole factor, but didn't the experiences of Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna have an influence on how negatively her niece, Queen Victoria, would regard the Romanov dynasty and its Russian Empire?

It didn't seem to be a problem initially - she got on well with her contemporaries, e.g. the sons of Nicholas I when she met them as a young woman, and her aunt's Russian experience was not referred to in connection with them at all.  It was later, when her children and grandchildren were grown and the Romanovs were marital prospects, that her views became much more negative.  She thought the Russians had messed her around over Alfred's marriage - on again, off again - and later, that they demanded too much of her court in accomodating the wife of a younger son.  The marriages of her two Hessian grandaughters made her 'frantic' - to quote her own words - as she was extremely possessive and thought her wishes weren't being sufficiently consulted, the Grand Dukes would take them too far away, the Romanov court had a clear history of being insufficiently respectful to her wishes and so on.  It seemed her own experiences were the basis of her negative views, rather than those of her aunt pre-disposing her to such attitudes.
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Hector on November 09, 2010, 06:53:33 PM
Quote
No doubt it wasn't the sole factor, but didn't the experiences of Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna have an influence on how negatively her niece, Queen Victoria, would regard the Romanov dynasty and its Russian Empire?

It didn't seem to be a problem initially - she got on well with her contemporaries, e.g. the sons of Nicholas I when she met them as a young woman, and her aunt's Russian experience was not referred to in connection with them at all.  It was later, when her children and grandchildren were grown and the Romanovs were marital prospects, that her views became much more negative.  She thought the Russians had messed her around over Alfred's marriage - on again, off again - and later, that they demanded too much of her court in accomodating the wife of a younger son.  The marriages of her two Hessian grandaughters made her 'frantic' - to quote her own words - as she was extremely possessive and thought her wishes weren't being sufficiently consulted, the Grand Dukes would take them too far away, the Romanov court had a clear history of being insufficiently respectful to her wishes and so on.  It seemed her own experiences were the basis of her negative views, rather than those of her aunt pre-disposing her to such attitudes.

Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna's elder sister Antoinette was married to Empress Maria Feodorovna's younger brother, Alexander of Württemberg, and he was commander of the Russian calvary. Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna's youngest brother, Leopold, owed a lot to his Russian connection since after the French occupied Coburg, he went to Russia to get a commission in the Russian Army. His fame through the battles he fought as well his good looks earned him praise through the courts of Europe including Napoleon Bonaparte. This lead to him getting the attention of Princess Charlotte, heir of the Prince Regent, who he eventually married and started the House of Saxe-Coburg on its way to ruling many of the thrones of Europe.

So guess it's important to remember that Queen Victoria's other aunt, Princess Antoinette, was very happy in Russia. Actually Princess Antoinette's daughter later became Prince Albert's stepmother when she married her uncle. Prince Albert's father had eariler tried to marry a Russian Grand Duchess but his womanizing reputation prevented and he married Prince Albert's mother, the 16-year-old Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg.

Back to Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna. Here is what her brother, Belgian King Leopold I, wrote about her in his memoirs (http://books.google.ca/books?id=DP50kOaAxH8C):
"In 1795, the Empress Catharine of Russia, being very anxious to conclude a match for the Grand Duke Constantine, her grandson, applied to M. de Budberg, a distinguished minister and general. She received, through his intervention, a visit from the eldest three princesses of Saxe-Coburg, all three possessing unquestionable beauty. The Grand Duke conceived an affection for Juliana, the youngest of the three; she was very pretty, but still a mere child, being only fifteen. Had the choice of Constantine fallen on Antonietta, she have filled admirably the position of Grand Duchess...
 
The empress-mother, in her preference for her two younger sons (the Grand Dukes Nicholas and Michael), did not desire the establishments of the two elder to be on a happy footing. Constantine himself was terribly cantankerous, and to crown the misfortune, the Grand Duke Alexander and his wife were Juliana's great friends, and supported her in her petty domestic differences. Had it not been for the empress-mother's shocking hypocrisy, things might have gone on well. The Grand Duke admired his wife very much, and she, with a lovable husband, would have been an excellent wife. She found herself miserable, and ended by leaving Russia in 1802."


In 1814, Leopold, then still an unmarried Prince of Saxe-Coburg, went with Grand Duke Constantine, who desired a reconciliation, to Elfenaau, near Berne, the place of residence of the Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna. The overtures ended up being fruitless.


Pictures

(http://royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/images/collection_large/2906716.jpg)
Leopold I, King of the Belgians



(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/76/Antoinette_of_Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld.jpg)
Princess Antoinette of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld



(http://www.royaltyguide.nl/images-families/wurttemberg/wurttembergdukes2/1771%20Alexander-1.jpg)
Her husband Alexander of Württemberg



[(http://www.royaltyguide.nl/images-families/wurttemberg/wurttembergdukes2/1799%20Marie-01.JPG)
Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (born Princess Marie of Württemberg)



(http://www.royaltyguide.nl/images-families/wettin/saxecoburggotha1/1784%20Ernst-01.jpg)
Duke Ernst I of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha



(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_hjD61YU8VYs/SeTOILFrXCI/AAAAAAAAEqA/sChaJVSXSkA/s320/Louise+of+Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg+by+William+Corden+1844.jpg)
Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (born Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Hector on November 09, 2010, 09:38:41 PM
anna feodorovna

(http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww199/vitavioletta/127.jpg)

Found another version of it.

(http://img1.liveinternet.ru/images/attach/b/3/18/113/18113951_Anna_Fedorovna_zhena_Konstantina_Pavlovicha.jpg)
(http://i013.radikal.ru/0802/6b/ea5ac7c35617.jpg)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: CountessKate on November 10, 2010, 07:32:44 AM
Quote
["In 1795, the Empress Catharine of Russia, being very anxious to conclude a match for the Grand Duke Constantine, her grandson, applied to M. de Budberg, a distinguished minister and general. She received, through his intervention, a visit from the eldest three princesses of Saxe-Coburg, all three possessing unquestionable beauty. The Grand Duke conceived an affection for Juliana, the youngest of the three; she was very pretty, but still a mere child, being only fifteen. Had the choice of Constantine fallen on Antonietta, she have filled admirably the position of Grand Duchess...
 
The empress-mother, in her preference for her two younger sons (the Grand Dukes Nicholas and Michael), did not desire the establishments of the two elder to be on a happy footing. Constantine himself was terribly cantankerous, and to crown the misfortune, the Grand Duke Alexander and his wife were Juliana's great friends, and supported her in her petty domestic differences. Had it not been for the empress-mother's shocking hypocrisy, things might have gone on well. The Grand Duke admired his wife very much, and she, with a lovable husband, would have been an excellent wife. She found herself miserable, and ended by leaving Russia in 1802."
/quote]

Very interesting to see Leopold's take on the matter.  I do feel however that he was being a bit unfair to Maria Feodorovna, who didn't have much influence on the marriages of her eldest sons nor on their lives until the death of Catherine.  Nor did she get on particularly well with Anna's sister-in-law Elizabeth, so I think the problem was more a division which had been created and nourished by Catherine, whose court set the tone for the Grand Ducal couples which was inherently antagonistic to Paul and Maria.  Both couples were married very young and neither were given much appropriate guidance from Catherine, nor allowed to bond with the parents of the Grand Dukes, and it's not hard to see their marriages falling apart without any intervention from the Empress-Mother. 
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Lacuspapa on November 29, 2010, 08:16:31 AM
Hi everybody, I am looking for the whereabout of Anna Feodorovna  after she left Sank Petersburg im July 1801until the first confirmed report from 1805 when she gave a reception in the Castle Fantaisie near Bayreuth. The option the she went direct home is ruled out because the family didn't wanted to see her. The love affair with Lignew husar-officer hasn't been approved. Does anybody know details? Some signs suggest, that she were involved the murder of Paul I and she had love affair with Alexander I too.
Thanks
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: gem_10 on August 13, 2011, 02:15:38 AM
Another portrait of Anna Feodorovna. I've never seen this one before. Does anyone have it in a clearer and bigger version? Any help would be very much appreciated.
Thanks in advance!


(http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff145/tokyogensou/116137.jpg)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Alexandrina-Sofia on October 14, 2011, 07:25:04 AM
Grand Duchess Anna Fedorovna in Elfenau. Oil on canvas. Attributed Firmin Masso.

(http://www.nashagazeta.ch/sites/default/files/articles/10.2.jpg)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: gem_10 on October 14, 2011, 10:40:42 AM
What a beautiful portrait Alexandrina-Sofia! Thank you for posting. May I know the date that it was painted and its current location? :)
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Alexandrina-Sofia on October 14, 2011, 01:14:37 PM
All known information about the portrait, I have already written. I found it in a newspaper article about Anna Fedorovna. Here is a link, but the article in Russian: http://www.nashagazeta.ch/news/11890

Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: gem_10 on October 14, 2011, 09:38:02 PM
Interesting article! Thank you!
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Alexandrina-Sofia on August 02, 2013, 10:08:38 AM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-wkfA3xjOiGY/UZdZbEvvktI/AAAAAAAABtQ/eRowtex9Mww/s320/420588_366719_LPR_0.jpg)

The site, where I found the portrait shown - miniature of Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna nee Princess Juliane Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld from the Royal Collection.
But I'm not sure that it really is Anna Feodorovna. May anyone know the date that it was painted?
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Dru on August 02, 2013, 01:17:52 PM
Alexandrina-Sofia,

It is Anna Feodorovna.  The artist is thought to be Carl Herman Pfeiffer, and it was painted around 1897. 
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Alexandrina-Sofia on August 04, 2013, 02:21:19 AM
Another two portraits of Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna.

(http://s018.radikal.ru/i506/1308/21/a65b9f82a845.jpg)

(http://s018.radikal.ru/i519/1308/b6/883ce1d280a9.jpg)
 
Title: Re: Anna Feodorovna
Post by: Ally Kumari on January 30, 2016, 02:03:05 AM
(http://40.media.tumblr.com/a2303d795be0d9dd8083cc06897edf28/tumblr_o19mua7x6l1rh07xwo1_1280.jpg)