Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Alexander Palace => The Alexander Palace => Topic started by: Sarai on May 05, 2004, 08:10:09 PM

Title: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibition
Post by: Sarai on May 05, 2004, 08:10:09 PM
From the New York Times Arts Briefing (http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/06/arts/06ARTS.html?ei=5062&en=4aa6448d73fd6c9f&ex=1084420800&adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1083805651-1wgnndlX2LqEf2r5iHJYEA):

"CZARIST TREASURES Bound for Newark next fall as part of a three-city United States tour, the exhibition "Nicholas & Alexandra: At Home With the Last Czar and His Family" will be previewed at the chancery of the Russian Embassy in Washington today, the 136th anniversary of the birth of Nicholas II. A project of the American-Russian Cultural Cooperation Foundation, the show, featuring more than 250 objects from five major Russian museums and some American collections, among them the Fabergé imperial "Lilies of the Valley Basket" from Alexandra's Mauve Room, a Marie Antoinette tapestry that was a gift from France, an imperial porcelain service and the personal photo albums of the czar and czarina, including pictures they took. The exhibition will have its world premiere at the Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe, N.M., from May 29 through Sept. 5, before moving to the Newark Museum from Sept. 29 through Jan. 9, 2005, and to the Cincinnati Museum Center from Jan. 29, 2005, through May 1."
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Merrique on May 07, 2004, 08:59:22 PM
This is absolutely wonderful.I can't wait until the exhibit comes to Cincinnati so I can see all of these wonderful treasures.I is a happy camper right now! :) ;D ::)
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Sarai on May 20, 2004, 07:16:37 PM
I found a bigger list of the wonderful objects being shown at this exhibition at this link: http://www.artandantiques.net/Spotlight.htm?CD=782&ID=1473

It reads, in part:

"Included in the show and representative of the Russian empire is a uniformed Fabergé statuette of Kamerkazak Kudinov, a Cossack palace guard, which sports diamond and sapphire studded piping down his uniform; noblesse oblige reveals itself in a satin embroidered apron that Alexandra, the granddaughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, wore when hosting charitable events—and into whose pockets she reportedly tucked token contributions."

"An official 1896 portrait of Nicholas II by Ilya Repin places the tsar amid flowering plants on a summer veranda. He wears a similar military uniform, replete with epaulets and medals, in a photographic portrait that pairs him, seated, with a standing Alexandra wearing a cap-sleeved gown decked with flower garlands in a verdant interior."

"Nicholas II was an amateur photographer, and his family portraits abound in this show. Many family letters complementing the photographs help to establish documentary flavor. Sketches of furniture arrangements, floor plans, as well as period watercolors of palace interiors help visitors imagine what the palace—one of eight the family occupied—looked like before the Bolshevik Revolution. "

"Closely held details of the couple’s daily life include flatware and an etched amethyst glass tea set. An Art Nouveau– influenced 1904 English-made table lamp and ashtray speak to influences from without. Books from Alexandra’s library include a 1912 edition of Omar Khayyam’s The Rubaiyat inscribed “For my darling Alix, [from] Nicky.” "

"...children’s toys occupy a large segment of the exhibition, perhaps because they were overlooked by ensuing rulers with bigger prerogatives than the playroom."

"If “Nicholas & Alexandra” boasts a share of objects that invite viewers to read closely between the lines, one such example is the textile Alexandra commissioned in France in 1900: a Gobelin tapestry reproduction of Marie Vigée-Lebrun’s portrait of Marie Antoinette and her children."
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Janet_W. on May 20, 2004, 10:51:39 PM
Thank you, Sarai!  A friend and I are planning to visit the exhibit in late July or early August. I'm thinking about it daily with great anticipation!
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Merrique on May 23, 2004, 07:30:04 PM
In case anyone is interested here are a couple of websites with some information about the exhibit.

http://www.museumofnewmexico.org/exhibits.cgi?_fn=Show+Exhibit&_recordnum=334


http://www.russiansummer.com/
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Almedingen on May 24, 2004, 09:47:07 AM

For those of you who will be seeing it in Cincinnati, Ohio:

http://www.cincypost.com/2004/02/18/nich021804.html
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Nick_Nicholson on May 24, 2004, 10:54:29 AM
This is a bit strange.  This exhibition closed several years ago.  I thought Broughton was out of business.  Why on earth is it coming to Cincinatti?

It is not the same exhibition currently in Santa Fe and organized by the Russian American Cultural Cooperation Foundation which will be in Newark later this year.

Nick
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Merrique on May 24, 2004, 04:11:17 PM
Maybe the Cincy Post article is wrong.At least I hope it is.I just sent them an email to see what they say about it.But I'm pretty sure after reading Nick's post that that article is wrong.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Almedingen on May 25, 2004, 12:56:52 PM
I did some more research and it looks like the Cincinnati Post was wrong.  (Whew!  It gave me a scare there for a minute).

Here is a list of where the exhibition will be with dates and places (I wonder what the catalog will be like that they mention):

http://home.hiwaay.net/~christel/exhibitions.html

Here is the site for New Jersey (It has some nice pictures):

http://www.newarkmuseum.org/NicholasandAlexandra/index.html
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Merrique on May 25, 2004, 05:36:16 PM
Thank you very much for posting those links Almedingen.
I was curious to see some of the things being shown at this exhibitI thought that the cincy post article was wrong.I sent them an email about it but as yet haven't gotten a response yet.It's kinda funny how we on this forum know more about this exhibit than a newspaper does lol. ;D
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Sarai on May 31, 2004, 10:25:37 AM
I would like to know if a catalogue is available for this exhibition and how I can purchase it. I would really love to have it, but seeing as how I can't make it to the exhibition, perhaps alternatively someone can pick one up for me (to be reimbursed for the cost and shipping, of course)?
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Sarai on May 31, 2004, 11:53:45 AM
Melissa,
You are too kind! I have just sent you my information via IM. Thank you very much ;D
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Sunny on May 31, 2004, 12:20:32 PM
Melissa, you are too kind (and am I glad :-))
Have just sent an IM.

Thank you,

Sunny
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Merrique on June 01, 2004, 07:36:30 PM
Melissa you are very kind.I would like a catalogue also.I've just sent you my info in an im.It is so great of you to offer to do this. :D
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: nerdycool on June 01, 2004, 10:41:39 PM
I work at a newspaper, and they're running a story about the exhibit. It comes from the Associated Press and there's a picture that goes with it of Marilyn Pfeifer Swezey, guest curator, who is standing in front of the "Marie Antoinette with her Children" tapestry. I can't post the picture, but here's the article for those who are interested. It's a little more in-depth about the activities going on.

SANTA FE (AP) — Its nickname is the City Different, but the same things draw visitors to Santa Fe year after year: blue skies, brown buildings, a heady jumble of cultures, and art, art, art.
But this bastion of all things Southwestern is offering tourists a new twist this summer — a season-long celebration of Russia.
Anchoring ‘‘Russian Summer’’ will be the world premiere of an exhibit devoted to the last royals to rule Russia.
‘‘Nicholas and Alexandra: At Home with the Last Tsar and His Family,’’ is on display daily at the state-owned Museum of Fine Arts, just off the downtown plaza, through Sept. 5.
It features furniture, clothing, paintings, textiles, toys, family photo albums and fabulous art objects — think jewel-encrusted religious icons — assembled from five Russian museums and private collectors.
The items are displayed in tableaux that represent the private quarters in the Alexander Palace, the Romanovs’ principal residence before they were exiled to Siberia during the 1917 revolution. Nicholas, Alexandra and their five children were murdered in 1918.
‘‘This is a first,’’ said the exhibition’s curator, Marilyn Pfeifer Swezey. ‘‘This is looking at Nicholas and Alexandra and their family at home.’’
Santa Fe is the only city west of the Mississippi to host the exhibit, which was organized by the American-Russian Cultural Cooperation Foundation in Washington, D.C. It will travel to Cincinnati and Newark before heading back to Russia next year.
City and state officials and Santa Fe businesses are using the exhibit as a springboard for a citywide festival of Russian performing and visual arts — from bluegrass to ballet to Ukrainian egg decorating.
Visitors can view 19th century Russian photographs, the works of Russian impressionists and wood carvers, and an exhibit on the people and landscape along the Trans-Siberian Railroad.
Lecture-lovers can listen to ruminations on the problems of contemporary Russia and the resilience of the Russian spirit. Or take a weeklong seminar on Dostoevsky at St. John’s College.
Or, they can kick back in the hotel lobby with a shot of Stoli and a good book.
‘‘I always have one copy of Robert Massie’s ‘Nicholas and Alexandra’ in stock, but I wouldn’t ordinarily go into summer with 50-plus,’’ said Dorothy Massey, owner of Collected Works, an independent bookstore preparing for a deluge of Russia-hungry readers.
Swig, a hip martini bar, has dreamed up drinks in keeping with the ‘‘Russian Summer’’ theme — with names like Cosmo-naut, Red Square, and KGB. For the truly hardy, there’s Crime and Punishment.
‘‘That’s on the stronger side of things,’’ explained general manager Patrick Padilla, describing a concoction of high-octane rum, bourbon, vodka, Cointreau ‘‘and a splash of Coca-Cola for color.’’
Hankering for a hit of faux-Russian zaniness? The Flying Karamazov Brothers, jugglers and comedians extraordinaire, will be at the Lensic Theater — a film and vaudeville palace reborn as a performing arts center — the first week in July.
There’s things for kids, too. The hands-on Santa Fe Children’s Museum is featuring dancing, puppet-making and Russian fairy and folk tales.
Several hotels are offering special packages that include passes to the museum exhibit.
Kenneth Pushkin, who sells 20th-century, Soviet-era Russian art from his gallery on leafy Canyon Road, hopes the summer’s events will create a lasting interest in Russian culture.
‘‘It’s a good place to start, just to present it as fun ... and that’s how you can endear people and build interest and build the cultural bridges that we’re talking about,’’ said Pushkin, who spends half his time in Russia and heads a charitable organization that supports orphanages and other projects there.
Pushkin, a distant relative of Russia’s greatest poet, Alexander Pushkin, is also producer of the major entertainment events that bracket Russian Summer: the Grammy-nominated Russian bluegrass group ‘‘Bering Strait’’ on Memorial Day weekend, and the American premiere of a new version of the ballet ‘‘Onegin’’ on Labor Day weekend. "
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Janet_W. on June 04, 2004, 03:27:53 PM
For those of you going to Santa Fe this summer, does anyone have any recommendations to make re: lodgings?
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Janet_W. on June 05, 2004, 10:11:25 PM
Melissa, thank you! My friend and I are close to finalizing our plans, and your input helped get us on the right track!  :D
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Maria_Vanya on June 07, 2004, 07:47:30 PM
I am definantly going to the one in Cincinnati. More closer to where I live. I bet it will be wonderful. I have always wanted to see their personal belongings and all the costumes and jewels! It will be a live changing experience for anyone who goes. :)
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Scott on June 07, 2004, 08:09:24 PM
The catalog to the exhibition is available on-line at: http://shopmuseum.com/shop/product159.html
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Janet Whitcomb on June 07, 2004, 09:04:32 PM
Thank you, Scott!   :)

I am eagerly awaiting the the time when I can began thumbing through that beautiful catalog's pages . . . looks like we'll be visiting the Santa Fe exhibit in late July!
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Maria_Vanya on June 08, 2004, 04:51:29 PM
I agree with Janet, I cannot wait to look through the catalog, thanks Scott! :)
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Maria_Vanya on June 14, 2004, 01:30:50 AM
Melissa, are they guided tours? If their is a tour guide do they let you have time to really look at things? I am going and would love to know everything I can about it before I go. Thank you! :)
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Sunny on June 14, 2004, 05:12:33 AM
Melissa, I look forward to reading more about your visit when you have the time. Did you have an opportunity to add to the docents shocking lack of knowledge? Not hard to see how the myths, lies, and rumors go on, and on. Did you have a "very" favorite item, or was everything in that category :-)? Thanks so much.

Sunny
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Janet_W. on June 14, 2004, 11:31:33 AM
"A gay old time under house arrest"? Say what?!  :o

My friend and I will be visiting the exhibit at the end of July, so needless to say, Melissa, I join the group in looking forward to more of your commentary! And we do plan to visit the museum more than one time.

As for their house arrest, certainly there were days less awful than others--once they learned "the ropes," their time at Tsarkoe Selo was at times not unpleasant, and sharing each other's company in Toblosk had its pleasures--but to say that had a "gay old time" is a bit like saying that African slaves had a peachy keen existence on ol' massah's plantation, isn't it?!    :P
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Janet_W. on June 14, 2004, 03:13:31 PM
Yikes. Scary.

I agree with your assessment, Melissa, and I'll go further to say that fawning and other forms of over-sentimentalizing definitely should not be part of the presentation. But to make a mockery of a loving family that was considered too middle class by many of their relatives . . . that's swinging way too much to the other side. C'mon, these were real people who  lost just about everything--except for each other--beginning with their freedom, followed by a slow but steady erosion of their material comforts (who among us would appreciate similar restrictions and changes, hmm?), and eventually forfeiting their lives via a despicable, brutal act, their bodies disrespected and gruesomely discarded.  

Yes, they had tremendous advantage and wealth all around them. But given the circumstances, N & A brought up their children as simply as they could, making sure to encourage modesty plus awareness of their priviledged circumstances. The older children already were, of their own volition, donating money to charities.  Olga and Tatiana gave many hours to war work, and there is strong reason to believe that the three younger children also would have continued this pattern of charity, fueled by empathy, had they lived and their father continued to serve as Tsar. (Or even had they lived in reduced circumstances outside of Russia.)

I'm a docent at an historic house in California. We respect the lives of the people who once lived in the house; we absolutely do not belittle or disparage them. Otherwise, what a waste of time and energy for all concerned . . . and quite frankly, why even #$@! bother?

With regards to the Santa Fe exhibit, if certain docents (or all of them; could this be the fault of a training program?!) do not respect the people who endured house arrest and then were viciously slaughtered, those docents need to get back into their ricketly little Aeroflot time machines and return to Soviet Russia where they can receive all sorts of ticky-tacky medals for turning in mom and pop and otherwise exemplifying the Komosol ideal.

P.S.  Before anybody in the U.S. gets smirky about the Romanov standard of living, may I remind them that we too have our contrasts of great wealth vs. people attempting to survive despite dire poverty and great despair? And here's yet another thought: Shall we run a check on the lifestyles of the folks associated with this exhibit and find out what aspects of their lives they would be willing to forfeit?!   >:(
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: _Rodger_ on June 14, 2004, 03:58:06 PM
Give 'em 'ell, Melissa!
>:(

I'm sure the docents were well trained before hand, so one has to imagine that they were merely spewing forth the party line.  
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Sunny on June 14, 2004, 04:03:39 PM
Janet...Bravo!!! Melissa, kudos to you for setting the automaton straight. Now, if he actually passes the message along..... ::)

Sunny
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: anna on June 14, 2004, 04:41:08 PM
Melissa,

Sorry to read you left the exhibit sick at heart! You would expect better trained people, at least docents who are interested and bring over their knowledge on the subject.

In september I hope to visit the exhibit on N&A in Amsterdam, I shall pay extra attention!

Anna
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Johnny on June 14, 2004, 05:53:28 PM
Anna,
Where and when is the exhibit in Amsterdam going to be? Living in Germany, I can probably get there very easily.
By the way, do you live in the Netherlands?

Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Merrique on June 14, 2004, 05:56:47 PM
I'm sorry that you left the exhibit sick at heart Melissa.You'd think the docents would have done some research so they could keep themselves from saying such stupid things.I think you kept your cool better than what I would have done.I'm the type of person who will speak her mind no matter what and I would have given them @#$& about stating incorrect facts.I hope when this exhibit comes to Cincy that this doesn't happen because I know I'll say something about it.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: anna on June 15, 2004, 04:20:30 AM
Quote
Anna,
Where and when is the exhibit in Amsterdam going to be? Living in Germany, I can probably get there very easily.
By the way, do you live in the Netherlands?



Hi Johnny,

Yes I live in the Netherlands. Here you will find info about the exhibit in A'dam. You're more than welcome ;)

The exibition about Nicholas and Alexandra in the little  
Hermitage in Amsterdam, is planned from 18-09-2004 till  
13-02-2005.
 www.hermitage.nl

Take care.

Anna


Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Sunny on June 15, 2004, 04:43:39 AM
Dear Melissa,  because Kenneth Pushkin, (connected to this event)"who sells 20th-century, Soviet-era Russian art from his gallery on leafy Canyon Road, hopes the summer’s events will create a lasting interest in Russian culture"...do you think that gracious, but to the point  letters addressing the problem, would get his attention. As he is supposed to be passionate about certain Russian themes, this would at least let them know that the slipshod verbal presentations don't go unnoticed...and that many people are aware, and care.

Just a thought,

Sunny
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: elisa_1872 on June 15, 2004, 07:17:56 AM
Melissa, thanks so much for telling us all about your trip! Im so sorry that the guides were so badly informed.. And Alexandra's writing desk was.. battered?? :'( Such preciousness.. +++
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Almedingen on June 15, 2004, 10:50:54 AM
Can you tell us more about the exhibition itself.  I heard the exhibition is set up like some of the rooms in the palace.  Is this true?  How did you like Alexandra's dresses?  What object did you find the most interesting?  Was there a large display of the children's toys?  What did you think of Alexei's christening gown?
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Antonio_P.Caballer on June 16, 2004, 07:46:21 AM
Dear Melissa,

Thanks so much for your account on the exhibition!

The palace´s sketches should be so interesting! For what you saw, i understand that they have almost all the original things(at least the most important) that were exhibited in the Alexander palace.
The sample of fabric from the children rooms i have never seen. Neither i saw the Annunciation painting....
So great all these things are preserved!!!
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Almedingen on June 16, 2004, 09:16:25 AM
Thanks for the reply.  I can't want to see it. ;)

Also, I got an email from the museum in Cincinnati stating that the tickets will go on sale in August.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Maria_Vanya on June 16, 2004, 01:22:31 PM
My question is, will they let people bring cameras to take pictures of everything? Or do they not want cameras going off while other people are trying to look at the exhibit? ???
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Maria_Vanya on June 16, 2004, 01:27:57 PM
Almedingen, do you have the e-mail address of the Cincinnati museum?? I am going to the exhibit there and really need some info. on it. Thanks!
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Sunny on June 16, 2004, 03:09:47 PM
Melissa, much gratitude for your touching descriptions of
the exhibition...lovely to "see" it through your eyes.
Hope that SM is able to put things to rights in any way possible. When I was much younger, and incorrect information was passed along (either in school, or conversation) about the IF, it was quite lonely being a solo voice for some truth on the subject. The passion, knowledge, and camaraderie shared at this forum are pure pleasure.

Thanks again,

Sunny
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Merrique on June 16, 2004, 03:29:47 PM
Almedingen can you give me the e-mail address for the cincy museum too?I want to find out as much info as possible so i can plan my visit. :)
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: LisaDavidson on June 16, 2004, 04:43:50 PM
I had planned to take quite a few photos when we visit Santa Fe week after next. However, my sister says no photography is allowed. I will be given a PR package that contains photos and these will all be turned over to the APTM for use on our website.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Sunny on June 16, 2004, 07:59:20 PM
Lisa, can't wait to see them...thanks.

Sunny
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Almedingen on June 17, 2004, 09:38:24 AM
Merrique,

Here is the link for the Cincinnati Museum.

http://www.cincymuseum.org/

I got an email from them saying they are still working on putting the At Home with the Tsar information on the site.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Robert_Hall on June 17, 2004, 01:13:41 PM
The more I hear about this exhibit, the less inclined I am to go to N.M. to see it ! I understand it will be in N.J. in the autumn. I think they may do a better job of presenting it, at least better docents. Also, it is on the way for my annual stay in England!
Cheers
Robert
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Robert_Hall on June 17, 2004, 01:17:22 PM
Maria Vanya
cameras, like mobile phones are rude & inconsiderate in museums just as in theatres & movie houses.  There may be exceptions for digital cameras, but I have not heard of any.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Michelle Ratcliffe on June 17, 2004, 04:25:34 PM
Robert Hall,
    I personally agree with where you are coming from, but I don't think it is really all that rude to bring a camera into the museum and take pictures. It restores their memories on the educational trip up there. It reminds them of everything they had learned and followed for so many years and even though you can get gifts from the gift shop they are not as sentimentel as the real thing or at least what you have captured in the pictures.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Dashkova on June 17, 2004, 06:41:47 PM
I agree with you regarding photography in museums.  If one is discreet and respectful and quiet, I don't see how anyone would have a problem.

Over the past six months I have visited the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., The Met in NY, the Tretyakov, Hermitage, Russian museums and endless churches and palaces.  

In the states it was never a problem taking photos, as long as there was no flash used.

In Russia it was, as usual these days, wild west capitalism. Almost everywhere I went (and I went almost everywhere, or so it seemed), visitors had the option of paying up to 600R to take interior photos or video.  The only place I encountered where photography was not allowed at all was the Amber Room, and of course, churches, though I personally know people (Russians, anyway) who have videotaped or photographed inside churches, but not during a service.
Over all, it seems that while some regard photography in museums as impolite, in many major museums it is officially acceptable, though many times conditional.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: rskkiya on June 17, 2004, 08:37:46 PM
 No matter what... I am still looking forward to this exibit (although I too should love to go back home for a holiday visit - Cheltenham- :) ) This is unrelated-- but I did read somewhere that Nicholas thought watching "cinematography"(movies) would corrupt ones moral fibre and lead one astray !
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Robert_Hall on June 17, 2004, 10:33:58 PM
Cameras in museums.
Well, with digital cameras now, it is not as much as a nuissance, but still inconsiderate. And I do know that people do it. I feel like applauding when I see museum staff stop people from doing it, but that would be just as rude !
Other than that, however, there are some major concerns over the materials being photgraphed: copyright not being the least.
Preservation is of utmost importance, especially when it comes to fabrics & paintings.
I maintain it is best to just buy the professionally photographed postcards. Or ASK the museum staff for pictures of items not on such cards. They usually can be obtained.
Cheers.
Robert
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Maria_Vanya on June 17, 2004, 11:27:57 PM
Sorry, I didn't know it was that rude to bring digital cameras into museums considering that I have only been to 3 museums in my life, between the ages of 9-12. Even then I didn't bring cameras because they weren't as interesting as this is going to be. But I won't take any since they aren't allowed and it's very rude! :) I hope there better docents in Cincinnati then there were in Santa Fe.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Lanie on June 18, 2004, 03:51:24 AM
I am SO excited about going...

As for cameras, why is it rude?  I take photos in museums, as long as I'm allowed to, anyhow; which means often no flash, but that's okay.  Rather upsetting we're not allowed to take pictures in the N&A exhibit, that's really annoying to me, I'd want to have pictures to remember my visit by! Oh well.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Louise on June 18, 2004, 10:36:07 AM
I just ordered the catalogue. Gee I wonder which one I will get first. The catalogue or the book I  am patiently waiting for.

Anyhoo, the catalogue looks wonderful and I can't wait to read it.

Louise
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: meg kees on June 21, 2004, 07:01:32 PM
I live in Cincinnati and will be happy to share any information with all of you as soon as it is available.  Also, I just returned from Russia last week and spent two days in St Petersburg.  Along with all of the major attractions, I visited the Alexander Palace and also the Peter and Paul Fortress where the last imperial family is buried in a small side chapel.  I took many photos, but being a digital newbie, it will be a while before I figure out how to get them on my laptop so I can share them with everyone.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Coldstream on June 25, 2004, 05:19:25 PM
Due to the downsizing of the British Army in 1993, all regimental bands with few exceptions (the Household Division, The Royal Irish Regiment, The Parachute Regiment, The Royal Gurkha Rifles) were disbanded and divisional bands organized instead.  The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (an amalgamated regiment formed through a union of the 2d Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) and the 3rd Carabiniers (Prince of Wales' Dragoon Guards)) retained their Pipes and Drums.  I do not know for sure whether the Pipe band continue the tradition of playing the old Russian Imperial Anthem.  It would sound rather strange being played on the pipes.

Incidentally, the photograph of the Czar's Royal Scots Greys full dress uniform in the exhibit catalogue shows the pouch belt being worn over the wrong shoulder!  I am sure most of you have seen photographs of Czar Nicholas II wearing this uniform with the belt beong worn correctly.

Perhaps an English member knows more.

Coldstream (AKA Bill McCaughey)
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: LisaDavidson on July 03, 2004, 09:38:00 PM
Greetings from Santa Fe! Lanie and I are here and going to see the exhibit for the 2nd time tommorow. Plan to see if you can!
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: tian79 on July 09, 2004, 01:22:57 AM
I was going through the At Home with the Last Tsar catalogue and found the following

Item 189.
22 notes passed between GD Tatiana and GD Olga at dinners during a cruise aboard the yacht Standard.

Was it told in the exhibition what they wrote?
Also was it normal to pass notes or was it just something the girls did?

Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Lanie on July 09, 2004, 02:09:22 AM
The notes were printed--they did not look like they were written 1914 to me, the writing looked rather childish--and one note was a cartoon of some dignitary-esque people in uniform (I think Olga drew it).  She pointed at a bald man's head with an arrow and wrote something there.  I only recognized one word in a note from Tatiana--love--so I have NO idea what it was about.  I assumed making fun of people!
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: KatieAnn on July 19, 2004, 09:46:35 AM
Does anyone know if this exhibition is due to come to the UK?  I'm desperate to see it, and will have to order the catalogue, but it's not the same as being there!
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Janet_W. on July 19, 2004, 03:27:16 PM
Katieann, I don't know when/if "At Home With the Last Czar" will be coming to the U.K. . . . but since those of us here in the States usually don't have access to anything like this at all, I hope you'll excuse our jubilation that the exhibit is "only" a few states away!

And Kay, belated thanks for your post. My friend and I will be in Santa Fe next week. We'll try to see things in a positive light, tho' admittedly I can have a bit of a thin skin re: the tone of certain exhibits. For example, I was furious re: the token "respect" shown the U.S.S. Arizona while visiting Hawaii some years ago. Granted that it quickly gets to be a bore for staffers dealing with us tourists. But, staffers need to remember that certain subjects have sensitivity for most of the people who go out of their way to see them.

On the other hand, tourists have obligations as well. I have rarely been so incensed as I was when I heard, about ten years ago, that some dippy friends of a relative--who is herself very superficial--went to Masada with a video cam, stripped down to bathing suits, and proceeded to film a "spoof" called "Eye On Masada"--a supposed sendup of a show in this area called "Eye on L.A."  It is amazing how some people are so totally lacking in imagination that they neglect to consider the feelings of living people, not to mention the memory of the dead.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Kay Tanaka on July 21, 2004, 11:55:41 PM
Dear Janet W,

I am so glad that you and a friend are coming to the "Nicholas and Alexandra:  At Home with the Last Tsar and His Family" exhibition.  There is a lovely place (which reminds me of St. Petersburg) serving afternoon tea from 2-6 PM.  If you have time and would like to join me, I would love to meet another Palace member.  Or, if I can assist in any other way, please let me know.

Many Blessings,

Kay
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Genevieve on August 24, 2004, 10:19:17 PM
First I want to introduce myself, I am a newbie here on the discussion forum.  I have been a long time member
on the main page. This exhibit is so exciting for me.  Plan
to go to Newark this fall.   Fell in love with the Russian
Royal Family when I read Nicholas and Alexander in High
School.   Avidly read every book that is on the main page
,some more than once.    I was wondering does anyone
know if there are any items sold in the gift shops of the museums.    I would love pictures or postcards to add to my collection.   Thank you in advance.
                               Genevieve
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Genevieve on August 27, 2004, 12:06:33 AM
I just love this web site.   Also plan on going to see the Titanic display in Philadelphia.      That also appears to
be a fantasic display.
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: chris on August 27, 2004, 09:19:37 AM
I plan on going to the one in Newark also, can't wait for it to open!
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Robert_Hall on August 27, 2004, 10:07:31 AM
Does anyone know where else this exhibit is going to be?  Is it just New Mexico & New Jersey ?I have searched and cannot find anyplace else mentioned.
Thanks,
Robert
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Forum Admin on August 27, 2004, 10:21:39 AM
Cincinnati Museum from January 29, 2005 until May 1, 2005.
This info is in the story I put in the email newsletter and the story on the AP mainpage Robert....tsk tsk tsk..
;D
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: Robert_Hall on August 27, 2004, 11:16:16 AM
Now that you mentioned it- I do remember  Cinci. but for some reason, blocked it out of memory.  I think I was hoping for  someplace on the West Coast.
If not, I still can stop in NJ on my way to the UK this winter.
{gee, what a winter: London, Paris, St. Petersburg & Newark, N.J.}
Thanks,
Robert
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: rskkiya on September 06, 2004, 07:34:43 PM
Hello all,

 Well I am sorry that I have not been posting as often as I should like, however life does keep on getting in the way... ;D
 Anyway I have just returned from a rather "spur of the moment" trip to Santa Fe to see the exhibit just before it was to move on to Newark, and I was delighted with the small and intimate setting and the general quality of the presentation. Aside from a few mis-labeled items- I was very satisfied.
 As for those gentle souls who had remarked that the docents and tour guides were flip, or that the exhibit was not respectful of the dignity of the Imperial family, I must respectfully disagree. I found the guides charming and  witty - my only complaint was that one gentleman tour guide seemed unable to correctly pronounce "Novgorod".   ;)
 To those happy enough to have seen the presentation especially on this last weekend - I am only sorry that I was unable to meet you all in person! Coffee and a chat afterwards would have made for the perfect ending to a short but lovely holiday! I am sorry that I did not witness the wreath that was mentioned earlier, it sounded charming  :-[ .
 But to anyone in NJ this one is a lovely little jewelbox of an exhibit! Run don't walk!  Thumbs Up!

Rskkiya :)
Title: Re: "At Home with the Last Czar" exhibit
Post by: alithere0 on September 30, 2004, 03:01:00 PM
Curious that several others have expressed a common interest in both the tragedy of the Romanovs and that of the Titanic.  Both stories have a haunting "what might have been" quality about them.   If there had been a pair of binoculars in the crow's nest, perhaps there would have been wnough time for the ship to swerve around the berg.  If Nicholas had done any number of things differently (not taken field command of the Russian Army during WWI, responded differently to Bloody Monday, etc.), he and his family might have saved their lives, if not his throne.  There is a wonderful poem about the inevitability of the Titanic's sinking.  It suggests that while the majestic ship rose in the shipyard in Northern Ireland, the mighty iceberg had broken off from the polar ice cap and had already set out on its slow drift south.  Nothing and no one could have stopped the meeting of the twain.  

The collision is a metaphor for each of our lives and fate, so perhaps that is the key to the dark and romantic "charisma" of the Titanic and the last IF.  

Does anyone know whether there is a recorded reaction by either N or A to the sinking?