Alexander Palace Forum

Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty => The Myth and Legends of Survivors => Topic started by: Helen_Azar on October 31, 2005, 09:00:38 PM

Title: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Helen_Azar on October 31, 2005, 09:00:38 PM
  This book has not been translated into English (and most likely won't be), but this just goes to show you that this is not purely a Western phenomenon.

Here is the translated book review:

http://www.geocities.com/mushkah/AAJapan.html
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Robert_Hall on November 01, 2005, 11:04:33 AM
Obviously for the romantic schoolgirl market. And, considering the price, would not even cost them lunch money !
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: jolie on November 01, 2005, 11:10:54 AM
except from site:

"One part was very impressive. "I had a younger sister." Anastasia (Anna Anderson) made this astonishing claim. As Tsarina had a 5th daughter, she was afraid that the Russian people would be mad at her. As a result, she gave the baby to someone abroad in secret. To explain the Tsarina's medical condition, the Russian government issued a statement that said: "the Tsarina had an "imaginary pregnancy"E

But Nicholas II allocated a lot of money for this baby. All these incidents are consistent with testimonies from royal servants who used to work inside the palace. And Anna Anderson found this younger sister later, and she even met her.
This is a book that you want to read again and again. By the way, how could you say that DNA testing was true? Do you know how easy it is to deceive the public? "



Ohhhhhhhhhh, this is good!  ::)

Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Helen_Azar on November 01, 2005, 01:28:39 PM
Quote
except from site:

"One part was very impressive. "I had a younger sister." Anastasia (Anna Anderson) made this astonishing claim. As Tsarina had a 5th daughter, she was afraid that the Russian people would be mad at her. As a result, she gave the baby to someone abroad in secret. To explain the Tsarina's medical condition, the Russian government issued a statement that said: "the Tsarina had an "imaginary pregnancy"E

But Nicholas II allocated a lot of money for this baby. All these incidents are consistent with testimonies from royal servants who used to work inside the palace. And Anna Anderson found this younger sister later, and she even met her.
This is a book that you want to read again and again. By the way, how could you say that DNA testing was true? Do you know how easy it is to deceive the public? "



Ohhhhhhhhhh, this is good!  ::)




Yep... Now you see that this is an international phenomenon  ;).
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: RealAnastasia on November 02, 2005, 06:49:40 PM
This story appears as well in "Anastasia; the Lost Princess" by James Blair Lovell. It's not serious at all . Perhaps, Anna Anderson needed someone to feel related and to love, and just "picked" her new sister, a Dutch woman who claimed to be "Princess Alexandra". But Blair Lovell included this in his book for he believed all he hear from Anna's mouth, even the most idiot of the things. I think she liked to make fun on him.

RealAnastasia.
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Louis_Charles on November 02, 2005, 09:11:58 PM
Well . . .no. I mean, Lovell claims that there was physical evidence to support the idea that Anna Andersen and Alexandra de Graaf were in contact with each other, a letter from Alexandra to "Anastasia" that was dated in 1969, I think. So she wasn't "making it up" (always assuming that Lovell wasn't completely relating falsehood). She was in contact with this putative sister, and she did recognize her claim.

Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: RealAnastasia on November 02, 2005, 10:27:13 PM
I didn't said that Anna Anderson invented the whole story. No...Read my message well. I said that she needed to have human affection from someone...Even a "made up sister".

Anna Anderson DID have contact with Alexandra De Graaf end THERE IS physical evidence about their relationships. I must go check, but I think there is more than one letter from AA to ADG. And "Princess Alexandra" even send to her "dear sister Anastasia" some Russian items to please her. One of the Alexandra De Graaf pics, was taken at Untenlengenhardt, while he Dutch lady was visiting AA.

I'm not denying that AA believed that ADG was a Romanov...I'm only remembering that james Blair Lovell accepted the feelings of a broken, sick , psychologically troubled woman as the true. If AA saids that ADG was the fifth daughter, he assumed that it must have been exactly like this. And he started an individual historical research that didn't show any conclusive evidence. The poor man purchased hours and hours of AA's conversations to Milukkof and I think it's a pity.  In these tapes, Blair Lovell couldn't find anything but senile ramblings.

AA knew Alexandra De Graaf and liked her. She said she was a Romanov. I can understand an old lonely women, who needed affection and love, beyond who she really was...I can't understand Blair Lovell, who inestead of being an objective historian made the mistake of "falling in love" with the subject of his book.  :-/

RealAnastasia.
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: aya-anya on November 03, 2005, 02:47:37 PM
Hi, I have the copy of this book!! The cover of the book looks good. I think this book was published in the summer of 1998, just before the release of the cartoon film “Anastasia.” I live in Japan and am currently writing a paper about the legend of Anastasia. (and I have been busy with the paper) I’m glad that someone has noticed this book, however, in my opinion, the author of the book leads the readers to a little confusing road and there is one thing that I would like to ask if somebody knows the answer…

Hisayoshi Tsuge, the author of this book, “The True Story of Grand Duchess Anastasia” has written in this book, that he went and saw Anna Anderson on one day in December in 1982…

“As I was waiting for 15 minutes, the another door opened and a woman in a wheelchair, whose height seemed about 150 centimeters tall (Japanese people use centimeters) appeared. Her skin is white as if it is transparent. When she looked up, her eyes were blue like aquamarine and it was impressive. ---Anastasia! I noticed there were some points that could be a reminiscence of her look in her young days. Her ears looked just like the ones of Anastasia in her teenager days. (page 248)”

Does anybody know the fact that Anna Anderson had seen a Japanese writer? I’d like to know, because it will be interesting to know if it is true…

And, according to my research for the paper, Japan was interested in the legend of Anastasia and the question whether or not she survived. The reason why I thought of the connection between Japan and the legend of Anastasia might be-

1. Because many fictional stories (more than 10 stories) based on the legend of Anastasia have been produced in Japan. The earliest one was produced in 1928. I have made a list of the titles of those fictional books/short stories based on the legend of Anastasia, produced in Japan…(If somebody would love to see the list with a synopsis of them in English, please tell me, I’d be happy to share it with anyone, if my English is not so bad!)

This is one of my favorite one, written by Soji Shimada in 2001, called “Russian Phantom Warship Case” (he is interested in the legend of Anastasia and I guess he is living in Los Angeles. In this story, Anastasia survived and surprisingly, her son was living in Japan. http://www.amazon.co.jp/exec/obidos/ASIN/4041682088/qid=1131047422/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_2_1/250-8089163-9129824

2. Well, because Anastasia’s father, Nicholas had visited Japan in 1981 (Remember that Nicholas came across the Otsu Incident?) and maybe Japanese people were interested in Imperial Russia and there were many news articles in newspapers. There was one article in newspapers I thought interesting and it was, that there was a rumor that Grand Duchess Tatiana survived and would give a lecture in Japan about her memoirs at Russian Court or something in 1918. (Of course it turned to be a rumor, but I found it interesting.) This was called as “Grand Duchess Tatiana Incident” and Kikuchi Kan, a classical writer in Japan wrote a short story based on the incident…I got the information about this from a paper written by a Japanese scholar.

I’ll be thrilled, if there are people in this forum who are interested in Japanese versions of the story of Anastasia…

aya-anya
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: stepan on November 03, 2005, 04:32:56 PM
All this is very interesting Aya-Anya!    Anna Anderson lived until febr. 1984 so it´s possible that this japanese author could have visited her in dec.1982. But I don´t know if it´s true. It´s fascinating that the Anastasia legend has produced so many fiction and other stories in Japan. It´s a pity that nothing of it has been translated to other languages.
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: RealAnastasia on November 03, 2005, 06:47:03 PM
Quote
Hi, I have the copy of this book!! The cover of the book looks good. I think this book was published in the summer of 1998, just before the release of the cartoon film “Anastasia.” I live in Japan and am currently writing a paper about the legend of Anastasia. (and I have been busy with the paper) I’m glad that someone has noticed this book, however, in my opinion, the author of the book leads the readers to a little confusing road and there is one thing that I would like to ask if somebody knows the answer…

Hisayoshi Tsuge, the author of this book, “The True Story of Grand Duchess Anastasia” has written in this book, that he went and saw Anna Anderson on one day in December in 1982…

“As I was waiting for 15 minutes, the another door opened and a woman in a wheelchair, whose height seemed about 150 centimeters tall (Japanese people use centimeters) appeared. Her skin is white as if it is transparent. When she looked up, her eyes were blue like aquamarine and it was impressive. ---Anastasia! I noticed there were some points that could be a reminiscence of her look in her young days. Her ears looked just like the ones of Anastasia in her teenager days. (page 248)”

Does anybody know the fact that Anna Anderson had seen a Japanese writer? I’d like to know, because it will be interesting to know if it is true…

And, according to my research for the paper, Japan was interested in the legend of Anastasia and the question whether or not she survived. The reason why I thought of the connection between Japan and the legend of Anastasia might be-

1. Because many fictional stories (more than 10 stories) based on the legend of Anastasia have been produced in Japan. The earliest one was produced in 1928. I have made a list of the titles of those fictional books/short stories based on the legend of Anastasia, produced in Japan…(If somebody would love to see the list with a synopsis of them in English, please tell me, I’d be happy to share it with anyone, if my English is not so bad!)

This is one of my favorite one, written by Soji Shimada in 2001, called “Russian Phantom Warship Case” (he is interested in the legend of Anastasia and I guess he is living in Los Angeles. In this story, Anastasia survived and surprisingly, her son was living in Japan. http://www.amazon.co.jp/exec/obidos/ASIN/4041682088/qid=1131047422/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_2_1/250-8089163-9129824

2. Well, because Anastasia’s father, Nicholas had visited Japan in 1981 (Remember that Nicholas came across the Otsu Incident?) and maybe Japanese people were interested in Imperial Russia and there were many news articles in newspapers. There was one article in newspapers I thought interesting and it was, that there was a rumor that Grand Duchess Tatiana survived and would give a lecture in Japan about her memoirs at Russian Court or something in 1918. (Of course it turned to be a rumor, but I found it interesting.) This was called as “Grand Duchess Tatiana Incident” and Kikuchi Kan, a classical writer in Japan wrote a short story based on the incident…I got the information about this from a paper written by a Japanese scholar.

I’ll be thrilled, if there are people in this forum who are interested in Japanese versions of the story of Anastasia…

aya-anya


I, for one, I'm interested in Japanese versions of Anastasia's story.  My problem is that I don't read Japanese. I'm a Mandarin student since 1985 and I 'm not  so bad reading it....But Japanese...No; this language is not among my skills. My great grandpa readed and spoke it, but not me. I like Enka, I like Hibari Misora, but I ask my Japanese friends to translate the lyrics of her sons for me. ..since I can't.  ;D

Well...I didn't know that Japanese people were interested in a possible Tatiana Nicholaievna surviving, but I'm interested in this subject. What do you exactly knows about it? And...are Japanese people aware about little Olga Nicholaievna animosity toward their country because the war and the little "scar" her father had in the forehead?

I like very much Japan, it culture, food, people and music, but I can't read japanese. WHAT A FRUSTRATION!  >:(

RealAnastasia.
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: RealAnastasia on November 03, 2005, 06:55:06 PM
I forgot to add that I'm really interested in your list!  ;)

Good luck with your Anastasia's paper!  :D I'm also seriously thinking about writing a book about her "legend", but not a fiction book, since I'm historian. Sadly, I should travel to Germany to see documents (the real ones and with my own eyes. I do not like to depend on Peter Kurth's, Domminique Auclères, Harriet Von Rathlef , Alain Decaux translations and so on. I want to have my "own" version of the facts). My brother and his wife spoke German, so they may help me. I'm not a German speaker...

RealAnastasia.
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: aya-anya on November 04, 2005, 01:06:54 AM
stepan and RealAnastasia, thank you!

I knew that Maria hated Japan because of the War and she said Japanese people are not tall (It could be true) but I did not notice that Olga's animosty.

RealAnastasia, it's a wonderful plan to visit Germany! Personally I'd like to see the castle Seeon where Anna Anderson lived btw and the canal, the very place where the legend of Anastasia was produced...Good luck with your breakthrough in there.

Okay, I'll start a new topic in this "The Question of Survivors" for Japanese versions of fictional stories of Anastasia. The Subject of the new topic would be "Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan" and see how it works...

aya-anya
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: aya-anya on November 04, 2005, 01:31:01 AM
Hi, I am writing about the legend of Anastasia, focusing on Japanese fictional translation of its legend for a thesis and I'm interested in sharing my researches with anyone in this forum. See how it works.

As you know, many fictional works based on the legend of Anastasia--the question whether or not she survived, have been produced. I guess the ones produced in the USA (Ingrid Bergman's Anastasia and its translation into a cartoon film, Anastasia) would be the famous one. Indeed, the legend of Anastasia lives in fiction and it has a history of translation.

I live in Japan and researched into the fictional stories of Anastasia in books. Japan has more than 10 fictional stories based on the legend.  But few people know the details about Japanese translation of the legend of Anastasia. My aim through this topic, Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan is to share Japan's translation with anyone.

Hope anyone will enjoy it,

aya-anya
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: aya-anya on November 04, 2005, 02:32:39 AM
First, I will talk about the earliest fictional stories of it.

In 1919, Kikuchi Kan, a classical Japanese writer wrote a short story, entitled Tatiana Hime. This story was based on a news article which was appeared in 1917. The news was, that somehow Grand Duchess Tatiana Nicholaievna survived and would give a lecture about her memoirs in Japan. It turned to be a rumor, however, Kikuchi translated the unique news article into a fictional story. In his fictional story, Kikuchi writes sympathy for the tragic fate of the Imperial family.

Here is the news article, which was appeared in Tokyo Asahi Shimbun on December 4, 1917 (page 5):

A Woman Who Was Mistaken for Grand Duchess Tatiana: The Policemen in Yokohama Were No Use


There was a rumor that the ex-Grand Duchess Tatiana, the second daughter of the ex-Tsar in Russia would exile to the United States of America. Chuangchun Telegraph has reported that she left Chuangchun and also it was said that she would arrive in Yokohama (The name of a place near Tokyo, in Japan) by taking the train which left Shimonoseki (The name of a place which is located in the western part of Japan) for Yokohama in the evening on December 2. Also, it was said that she would leave for the USA by taking a steamship called Shunyomaru which would leave Yokohama on December 3.

Kanagawa Prefectural Police considered this event would be important, however, according to the researches, this information about the visit of a Russian woman who could be Grand Duchess Tatiana is not true at present. Indeed, the policemen in Kanagawa prefecture and Mizugami Kaga frequently checked with the Toyo Kisen Company [A Japanese Steamship Company, established in 1896] in the afternoon of December 3. Although in this rumor there seemed to be something secret, it turned out that Mrs. H Romanov (aged 36) who was a wife of Mr. Romanov (56) staying in the room of no.136 of the steamship on the morning of December 3, was not Grand Duchess Tatiana. The room clerk of the steamship, Mr. Yoshioka has said, “Although Mrs. Romanov is incredibly beautiful, she is older than Grand Duchess Tatiana and she does not resemble Grand Duchess Tatiana at all if you compare her with the photos of Grand Duchess Tatiana. She has a husband and a seventeen-year-old son.” According to Mr. Yonezima, who works at the steamship company has talked with Mrs. Romanov, “Mrs. Romanov said that she was not Grand Duchess Tatiana, at all. However, she said that she would feel honored if Grand Duchess Tatiana takes this steamship just like the rumors.”
(The Resource of This Article is from Yokohama Telephone Exchange Office)



This news article was also appeared in some other news papers in Japan. It is the story of a Russian woman whose last name happened to be Romanov. And because of the last name, Romanov, the woman was mistaken for Tatiana. In 1917, as you know, the last imperial family led their life in captivity.

As I browsed the old newspapers around 1917-1918 in Japan, (the letters in Japanese were difficult to understand, because it’s different from the modern ones) I found a series of the column, entitled “The Biography of ex-Tsar” slightly after Nicholas’s abdication and some various photos of Nicholas were appeared in the news article of Nicholas’s abdication. Japan followed the information about the last Imperial family and I guess Japan felt sympathy for them.

The earliest work produced in Japan was not about Anastasia but Tatiana. Considering the fact that Japan had produced the fictional work related to the Russian Imperial family in the earlier stage, Japan had an interest in the legend of Anastasia and Imperial Russia.

(I referred to a paper written by Yashushi Muto, a Japanese scholar of literature, entitled The Legend of Anastasia. Kofu: Yamanashi Prefectural Museum of Literature, 1999. In a Journal, Documents and Studies Vol.4.)

The next fictional story was written by Yumeno Kyusaku, who mainly wrote scary stories, in 1928. It is entitled The Love After Death. In this story, Anastasia is disguised as a soldier to cover her identity. She has the jewels of Romanovs in the story. A man named Kornikov, who was given the jewels by Anastasia, tells the story about Anastasia after her death. Kornikov is haunted by the story of her and her jewelry and his hair becomes white in one day because of his tremble. This story written by Yumeno was appreciated by the writers.

1928 was when Anna Anderson visited New York and also the year when two films about Anna Anderson were released in Germany. Did Yumeno know about Anna Anderson? Considering that Yumeno was a reporter of a newspaper and had great knowledge on Russia, he should have already known about the mystery of Anastasia.

Yumeno has written, "The fate of the love after death which possesses with me has reached to an extreme of nobility, seriousness and mystery." And I guess, Japan's translation of the legend of Anastasia has the feature, "haunting and beautiful." Comparing Japanese ones with Hollywood translation of it, Japan's ones are unique. What do you think?

I'm sorry that I'm writing too long and hope it is not boring...okay, next I'll make the lists of the titles of the fictional works in Japan.

aya-anya
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Rachael89 on November 04, 2005, 04:00:30 AM
Please continue Aya anya ;Dall these stories are fascinating!

Rachael
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: RealAnastasia on November 04, 2005, 06:29:17 PM
Thank you, Aya-Anya! I would like very much this new topic.  ;)

RealAnastasia
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Margarita Markovna on November 05, 2005, 12:02:07 PM
Quote
A new nonficton novel being published right before the release of the movie
(from translation)


Nonfiction novel??
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: RealAnastasia on November 05, 2005, 10:26:51 PM


Wow! This is really amazing, Aya-Anya! People knows much more American and French fiction about Anastasia, that it's a pity! I like much more Japanese fictions, and I'm sad for I'm not able to read Japanese language.... :-[

I think I can explain with happened with this first Romanova, mistook as  Tatiana Nicholaievna. "Romanov" is a very common last name in Russia, and this 37 years-old woman having a husband and a 7 years old little son had only said that she was "Mrs. Romanova", but she never said she was Tatiana, the "Tsar Daughter"...Kind of confussion, but it was an understable one.

There was almost a paranoia of people looking for Romanov survivors in those times, and whispers are always strongest than truth... :-/

RealAnastasia.
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: aya-anya on November 06, 2005, 04:40:25 AM
Quote
(from translation)


Nonfiction novel??


Yes. The publisher of the book defines it as nonfiction novel however, in my opinion, it's the autobiographical book, and I think the author of the book just took ideas (stole, in my personal opinion) from James. B. Lovell's one (Japanese translation version of Lovell's one was published in 1992). Funny, most of writers/reviewers in Japan have been greatly influenced by James B. Lovell's book.  It's a great problem in Japanese "translation" of the stories of Anastasia and AA. I strongly hope, somebody should publish the translation versions of Peter Kurth's one and John Klier/Helen Mingay's one and some books as many as possible.

By the way, the author of The True Story of Anastasia wrote a short essay or something like that about AA in his other book before he published this book. I'll borrow it from the library and post the review of the other version when I finish reading it.
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: aya-anya on November 06, 2005, 06:21:12 AM
Here is the list of Japanese Fictional Stories Based on the Legend of Anastasia. Hope you'll find that Japan is interested in the story of Anastasia...

[In the order of Published Year, The Name of Author, Novel/Short Story, The title of the Work]

1919  Kikuchi Kan.  Short Story, Tatiana Hime [Grand Duchess Tatiana]

1928  Yumeno Kyusaku.  Short Story, Shigo no koi [The Love after Death]

1989  Yoko Yamazaki.  Novel, Yokohama Hisoku Carta [The Game with the Color, Grey-Blue in Yokohama]

1991  Yutaka Maya. Novel, Tsubasa aru yami [The Darkness with Wings]

1994  Reito Nikaido. Novel, Akuryo no yakata [The House of Devils]

1999  Yoko Yamazaki.  Short Story, Anastasia: the Princess in the Dark in the book The Beautiful Women in Legends with Illusions

2000, February Yoko Ogawa.  Short Story, Sosei [The Resurrection] in the book The Accidental Happiness

2000,  October  Takashi Atoda. Short Story, Shiroi-kani [The White Crab]

2000,  November   Nobuhito Takanuki. Novel, The Mysterious History in Russian Empire: The Crest of Double Eagle

2001  Soji Shimada. Novel, Russia Yurei Gunkan Jiken [The Russian Phantom Warship Case]

2002  Yoko Ogawa. Novel, Kifujin A no sosei [The Resurrection of Lady A]

The synopsis and reviews of them will come soon…There are also some works related to the story of Russian Imperial family.

aya-anya
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: RealAnastasia on November 06, 2005, 09:52:31 PM
How an amazing list! I'm wondering what Anastasia would feel if she knew how people remember her in Japan...Here in Argentina, we only had a theater piece, named " Anastasia at Night" performed by Nacha Guevara, a red-haired actress of us in the 1970's (I couldn't see it since I had only three or four years old  ;D) and the TV especial "Anastasia of Russia" performed by the actress Andrea del Boca, who in those times, were almost a twin sister of Anna Anderson. But we had not "Anastasia's comics" or fictional writen works as historical novels and such even if we have excellent writers and a lot of comic autors... :-/

RealAnastasia.
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: aya-anya on November 16, 2005, 09:23:31 PM
Hi. I borrowed the book written by the author of The True Story of the Grand Duchess Anastasia from the library and here's what I have found through the book, entitled The Record of My personal Encounters with Soldiers and Celebrities published in 1988: (that means he had been interested in the legend of Anastasia/the case of Anna Anderson ever since 1980s.)

When the author of this book saw Anna Anderson in December in 1983 (1982? the author of this book writes it was 1982) she looked nervous because it was slightly after the kidnap-incident (Jack Manahan took her from the hospital in November). The author of this book, Hisayoshi Tsuge could visit her through a certified public accountant who frequently checked with the hospital where Anna Anderson was at that time.

Here's the excerpt from his conversation with Anna Anderson (The original is in Japanese so I am not sure if my translation is definitely correct)

(From p. 274)
Tsuge: You've been talking in English for decades--it's been more than 50 years since you moved to here [the USA] right?

Anna Anderson: 55 years, I guess. I've been talking in English but back in Russia, in fact I talked with my family in English, because, you know, my mother lived in Britain [in her young days].


Through the conversations with Anna Anderson, he came to be convinced that she was real.

aya-anya
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: etonexile on November 17, 2005, 11:04:46 AM
Quote
Hi. I borrowed the book written by the author of The True Story of the Grand Duchess Anastasia from the library and here's what I have found through the book, entitled The Record of My personal Encounters with Soldiers and Celebrities published in 1988: (that means he had been interested in the legend of Anastasia/the case of Anna Anderson ever since 1980s.)

When the author of this book saw Anna Anderson in December in 1983 (1982? the author of this book writes it was 1982) she looked nervous because it was slightly after the kidnap-incident (Jack Manahan took her from the hospital in November). The author of this book, Hisayoshi Tsuge could visit her through a certified public accountant who frequently checked with the hospital where Anna Anderson was at that time.

Here's the excerpt from his conversation with Anna Anderson (The original is in Japanese so I am not sure if my translation is definitely correct)

(From p. 274)
Tsuge: You've been talking in English for decades--it's been more than 50 years since you moved to here [the USA] right?

Anna Anderson: 55 years, I guess. I've been talking in English but back in Russia, in fact I talked with my family in English, because, you know, my mother lived in Britain [in her young days].


Through the conversations with Anna Anderson, he came to be convinced that she was real.

aya-anya


And he was mistaken....
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Helen_Azar on November 17, 2005, 11:21:53 AM
The person who did the translation from Japanese for us mentioned that the author's description of his meeting with Anna Anderson sounded almost exactly word-for-word like Peter Kurth's, so he is convinced that the author just copied it from Kurth and never really met her at all. I can't imagine anyone would be so blatant, but stranger things have happened...
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: aya-anya on November 17, 2005, 07:48:14 PM
Hi.
Thank you Helen_A!

The author of this book did not put Peter Kurth's book in references btw. He must have referred Peter Kurth's one though. The references he used for writing the book are: Summers and Mangold's one, Anastasia's Album by Brewster,  J. Lovell's book, Radzinsky's book, the video, Anastasia Dead or Alive and Last of the Czars by Discovery Channel.

I had been long doubted this book when I read the part of Tsuge's approval with J. Lovell's "another sister of Anastasia in Dutch" story...

Okay, so now I came to think that "the legend of Anastasia" in Japan is not trustful...in my opinion, here in Japan people who are interested in this seem to believe that the missing one is Maria, not Anastasia...in Japan this topic had become complicated, although there might be many people who are profoundly interested in it.

aya-anya
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Helen_Azar on December 12, 2005, 05:52:41 PM
...written by one of the AP forum posters ("aya-anya")...


http://www.geocities.com/mushkah/LegendsJapanMainPage.html


Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: etonexile on December 12, 2005, 08:41:22 PM
Quote
...written by one of the AP forum posters ("aya-anya")...


http://www.geocities.com/mushkah/LegendsJapanMainPage.html




Somehow I can't even bring myself to read this...Is it just dreadful muck...?
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: aya-anya on December 12, 2005, 10:21:24 PM
Thank you, Helen_A for posting. I did not have courage to post the link by myself though, because of some contents in my articles and my opinions that I posted before in this forum...

Quote

Somehow I can't even bring myself to read this...Is it just dreadful muck...?


Well, I wrote it. Your opinion is definitely true.

For the people who are going to click the link:

Please do not click it if you are not interested in those fictional stuff based on AA's story and the Romanovs at all. I gave a warning, it's your choice then, whether or not you click it.

What I'd like to tell is, that "Faces of Russia, Past and Present:The Online Journal" consists of excellent articles.  I know that mine is horrible.

Thank you for your patience,

aya-anya
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Helen_Azar on December 13, 2005, 07:51:31 AM
Quote

Somehow I can't even bring myself to read this...Is it just dreadful muck...?


Dear Eton,

Based on the questionable nature (for the lack of a better term) of the many "Anastasia" posts we see here, I can completely understand why you would be reluctant to click on this link... But rest assured, Ayano's article is not in any way related to the plentiful "Anastasia muck" we often encounter on these "Survivor" threads. I see it as more of a study of how a culture that is not our own (western) responds to the same popular historical legends... It is a story on human psychology rather than another "Did Anastasia survive?" one. I find that aspect of it quite interesting.

As Ayano sums it up at the end of her first article: "The legend of Anastasia has been translated from history and it may be a key to the social interests in cultural translation as well as in historical legends.  

Both Margarita and I are glad that Ayano decided to submit her articles to our online journal.  
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Rachael89 on December 13, 2005, 09:03:29 AM
How fascinating Helen, thankyou and congrationlations Aya Anya the article is very interseting and I like the pics do you have any more screenshots from the program?

Rachael
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: etonexile on December 13, 2005, 11:39:48 AM
Thanks Helen....I shall read the article....ee
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Belochka on December 13, 2005, 06:10:26 PM
Quote

Both Margarita and I are glad that Ayano decided to submit her articles to our online journal.  


We are delighted that aya-anya generously presented the Japanese perspective regarding the fictional tale of Anastasia which most readers would be unaware.

To tie in legendary Japanse literary essences of heroism for most of us is novel and creates and by itself a focus of special interest we are able to enjoy no matter how one may feel on this matter.

With sincerity I encourage aya-anya to continue her journey. While a minority may prefer to be critics there are far more who enjoy this unique offering and can apppreciate the articles for what they are.

I humbly apologise to aya-anya for the hurt some may have caused you. Both discussions were offered to our online Journal in good faith and we are pleased to accept them.

Thank you for your generosity aya-anya,

Kind regards,

Margarita  :)
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: RealAnastasia on December 13, 2005, 08:38:42 PM
I liked very much the link Aya-Anya.

Generally, people pay attention only to historical info that comes from the EEUU or the UK. I would like to see more historical information about the Romanovs coming form other countries .

Thank you again, Aya-Anya!

RealAnastasia.
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: aya-anya on December 16, 2005, 05:45:20 AM
Hi,

I'm happy to know that there are people who read my articles. Writing these articles was a big challenge to me.

Thank you so much, Helen_A and Belochka, for your supports, you two are awesome! I hope etonexile will feel like reading mine.

Rachael89, I sent you a private message about the screenshots form the program. Hope you'll enjoy the photos.

RealAnastasia, actually you inspired me to write the article, through your comments about my post in the other thread. Thank you!

aya-anya
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Pegschalet on February 02, 2010, 06:27:25 PM
Is aya-anya still posting?  I was very interested to read her article but it is no longer on geocities.  Did anyone copy it?  Thank-you
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Grand Duchess Jennifer on February 02, 2010, 10:43:11 PM
Aya-Anya hasn't been online for nearly four years so I don't think she's still posting...also geocities closed all sites hosted on it.
Title: Re: Fictional Stories of Anastasia, in Japan
Post by: Pegschalet on February 03, 2010, 02:55:15 PM
Thank-you