Alexander Palace Forum

Books and Films about the Romanovs and Imperial Russia => Books about the Romanovs and Imperial Russia => Topic started by: Sarushka on November 25, 2006, 06:45:53 PM

Title: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Sarushka on November 25, 2006, 06:45:53 PM
Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Due July 2007
McElderry Books (an imprint of Simon & Schuster)

http://www.amazon.com/Curse-Romanovs-Staton-Rabin/dp/1416902082/sr=8-1/qid=1164501277/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-7971130-9772846?ie=UTF8&s=books (http://www.amazon.com/Curse-Romanovs-Staton-Rabin/dp/1416902082/sr=8-1/qid=1164501277/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-7971130-9772846?ie=UTF8&s=books)

Not much info is out yet, but I understand this book is to be a young adult novel with some fantasy elements, narrated by Aleksei.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: azrael7171918 on November 27, 2006, 06:47:50 PM
 I found some more info at Allbooks.com  It is a time travel book with Alexie escaping Rasputin by going into the future where he meets a relative who is working on a cure for Hemophilia.

Az
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Belochka on November 27, 2006, 08:52:57 PM
What an abhorrent book!

Margarita  :-X
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Sarai on July 30, 2007, 02:11:32 PM
Here is a link to a recent NY Times article in which the author of this book is interviewed:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/29/nyregion/nyregionspecial2/29bookswe.html?_r=1&adxnnl=1&ref=books&adxnnlx=1185822426-S94g8MpYznnmeCympR8kxQ&oref=slogin (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/29/nyregion/nyregionspecial2/29bookswe.html?_r=1&adxnnl=1&ref=books&adxnnlx=1185822426-S94g8MpYznnmeCympR8kxQ&oref=slogin)
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: imperial angel on July 30, 2007, 03:12:21 PM
I found some more info at Allbooks.com  It is a time travel book with Alexie escaping Rasputin by going into the future where he meets a relative who is working on a cure for Hemophilia.

Az

Sounds like quite a fantasy. Has anyone ever read this, and if so, can they post what they think? It doesn't sound like it would be very good.. ;)
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Sarushka on July 30, 2007, 03:48:46 PM
I've read it, but I really can't reveal my opinion without some heavy-duty spoilers. Please PM me if you're interested.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: FairyCutie86 on October 12, 2007, 05:33:34 PM
I think it sounds interesting.  I saw this when I was looking at the post about "Crimson Snow" at the top of the forum.  I love historical fiction, no matter how crazy or out of place the topic is.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Divia on October 13, 2007, 10:10:26 AM
Ineresting.

Dunno if my patrons would read such a novel, but as a person who reads/writes historical fiction I really wish writers(good ones)w ould tap into Russian History a bit more. I'm growing tired of the neverending Tudor novels.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Sarushka on October 13, 2007, 08:01:25 PM
I'll say this much: Staton Rabin has done her Romanov homework, right down to the gender of Aleksei's dog. As best as I can remember, any historical discrepancies in Curse of the Romanovs were made deliberately to fit the plot of the fantasy.

The book did not appeal to me because in the end I simply was not comfortable with the extent of the dramatic liberties the author took with the imperial family's history.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Divia on October 14, 2007, 02:06:22 PM
I dont mind it so much when authors change things for their story. Historical fiction is just that...fiction. It isnt fact, it isnt non fiction.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Sarushka on October 14, 2007, 06:15:30 PM
To each his own. :)
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Divia on October 15, 2007, 05:00:15 AM
Yes indeed. 

Though there is this constant argument on historical fiction forums and I never truly understood it. Fiction is not true. Non-fiction(unless we are dealing with a million little pieces) is true. While not all historians get the facts right and they do argue their pov they make an effort to present the information in a historical manner. The same cannot be said for historical fiction writers. We do a lot of research for our books but not everything is 100% true.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Sarushka on October 15, 2007, 08:38:54 AM
There should definitely be a happy medium, but it's hard to satisfy everyone. I know I'm MUCH more particular about historical accuracy when the main characters are real people.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Divia on October 15, 2007, 06:11:39 PM
author carolly Erickson says in her books that they are "historical entertainment." Which I think is quite interesting. Her latest book is about Empress Josephine, though I daresay it is very much entertainment. I guess such things do not bother me. I like a good story.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: LisaDavidson on October 20, 2007, 10:03:47 AM
I'll say this much: Staton Rabin has done her Romanov homework, right down to the gender of Aleksei's dog. As best as I can remember, any historical discrepancies in Curse of the Romanovs were made deliberately to fit the plot of the fantasy.

The book did not appeal to me because in the end I simply was not comfortable with the extent of the dramatic liberties the author took with the imperial family's history.

Sarah: This is exactly my opinion about the book, except it did appeal to me. Here's why: any fantasy which takes the Family out of their bleak circumstances during the war or exile and imprisonment to me is welcome. But, I, too was uncomfortable with the license.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Belochka on October 22, 2007, 07:11:23 PM
... except it did appeal to me. Here's why: any fantasy which takes the Family out of their bleak circumstances during the war or exile and imprisonment to me is welcome. But, I, too was uncomfortable with the license.

The "bleak curcumstances" were indeed real and IMHO to provide a gloss to these realities for the sake of novel does not provide me with just a modicum of discomfort.

Margarita
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: LisaDavidson on October 22, 2007, 08:36:37 PM
... except it did appeal to me. Here's why: any fantasy which takes the Family out of their bleak circumstances during the war or exile and imprisonment to me is welcome. But, I, too was uncomfortable with the license.

The "bleak curcumstances" were indeed real and IMHO to provide a gloss to these realities for the sake of novel does not provide me with just a modicum of discomfort.

Margarita

This is a novel intended for a young adult audience - I am not in their demographic. There is no gloss at all involved - have you read the book, Margarita? The issue that Sarah and I have is that pertinent facts are ignored for the sake of the story. It's not a matter of glossing over what really happened, it's altering facts (and in defense of the author, he/she does make explain in the notes following the book where artistic license has been taken).

I think that Orthodox Christians may object to saints in their church being depicted as fictional characters. And others may object for their own reasons.

However, many of us live in free societies where we are able to make such decisions for ourselves as to whether or not to purchase or read a book. If you are able to make such decisions for yourself, you may consider all the information on this thread in making your decision.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Sarushka on October 22, 2007, 10:25:32 PM
However, many of us live in free societies where we are able to make such decisions for ourselves as to whether or not to purchase or read a book. If you are able to make such decisions for yourself, you may consider all the information on this thread in making your decision.

Indeed. And I would hope that anyone offering "information" about this book -- or any other, for that matter -- would have the courtesy to read it before passing judgement. Frankly, I do not like Curse of the Romanovs, but I will stand up for its right to fair and informed commentary nevertheless.

If you object to the premise of the book on principle, that's fine and dandy. Goodness knows there's plenty of stuff I won't touch with a 10-foot pole, and I'll be the first to admit I have a heavy bias against historical fiction that significantly alters history or historical figures. However, if you haven't actually read the book, it's only fair to say so.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Belochka on October 22, 2007, 10:31:31 PM
... except it did appeal to me. Here's why: any fantasy which takes the Family out of their bleak circumstances during the war or exile and imprisonment to me is welcome. But, I, too was uncomfortable with the license.

The "bleak curcumstances" were indeed real and IMHO to provide a gloss to these realities for the sake of novel does not provide me with just a modicum of discomfort.

Margarita

... It's not a matter of glossing over what really happened, it's altering facts

I think that Orthodox Christians may object to saints in their church being depicted as fictional characters. And others may object for their own reasons.

However, many of us live in free societies where we are able to make such decisions for ourselves as to whether or not to purchase or read a book. If you are able to make such decisions for yourself, you may consider all the information on this thread in making your decision.

One does not necessarily have to be a member of the Orthodox Church to be repelled by tasteless fiction such as this. As you have correctly written other factors can also contribute to one's objections.

However I do thank you in permitting me the freedom to "consider all the information on this thread".

Margarita
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Belochka on October 22, 2007, 10:56:10 PM
... And I would hope that anyone offering "information" about this book -- or any other, for that matter -- would have the courtesy to read it before passing judgement. Frankly, I do not like Curse of the Romanovs, but I will stand up for its right to fair and informed commentary nevertheless.

If you object to the premise of the book on principle, that's fine and dandy. Goodness knows there's plenty of stuff I won't touch with a 10-foot pole, and I'll be the first to admit I have a heavy bias against historical fiction that significantly alters history or historical figures. However, if you haven't actually read the book, it's only fair to say so.

Information about the deficiencies or merits of a given work of fiction can come from a number of sources, I am sure that you must agree.

From curiosity one can attempt to read the book because it was made available on the library or bookstore shelf. One can physically pick up the book and scan through it to gain an impression of content and writing style.  One can also take into consideration editorial and reader reviews to judge whether the purchase of the book is warranted.

Margarita
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Louis_Charles on October 22, 2007, 11:03:40 PM
In other words, one hasn't read the book. Well, that's fine. One must make do with what one must make do.

I'm just guessing that the vampire novel in which Tatiana becomes a neck-biter after Rasputin, who is a VAMPIRE! bites her won't be one's cup of tea, either. Anyone else read that thing? It was hilarious. Tatiana teams up with Lord Byron (also a VAMPIRE!) and they fight the bad vampires.

I read it years ago, can't remember the author or title. Can anyone help? Anyone? Bueller? Anyone?
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Sarushka on October 22, 2007, 11:45:37 PM
Information about the deficiencies or merits of a given work of fiction can come from a number of sources, I am sure that you must agree.

As I'm sure you've noticed of late, we have vastly different opinions on a number of matters. In view of that, please refrain in future from presuming to be "sure" of what I agree with.


Quote
From curiosity one can attempt to read the book because it was made available on the library or bookstore shelf. One can physically pick up the book and scan through it to gain an impression of content and writing style.  One can also take into consideration editorial and reader reviews to judge whether the purchase of the book is warranted.

I find it interesting that you have avoided Lisa's question ("...have you read the book, Margarita?") and also skirted my follow-up. Further, precisely as I suggested, all of the methods of analysis you propose involve reading some portion of the book, or at the very least gleaning information from those who have read it in its entirety. If you give a book a try and didn't like it, fine -- but again, it's only fair to say as much so that others can make informed decisions. If on the other hand your opinions of "a given work of fiction" are derived from others' analyses, those sources deserve credit.

But let's quit pretending we're talking hypothetically. This thread concerns Curse of the Romanovs and Lisa's question still stands: Have you read the book -- or any portion thereof?
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Belochka on October 22, 2007, 11:53:28 PM
In other words, one hasn't read the book. Well, that's fine. One must make do with what one must make do.

Did one say that?

...Tatiana teams up with Lord Byron (also a VAMPIRE!) and they fight the bad vampires.

One can only wonder about the impressions made by those "bad vampires".
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Louis_Charles on October 22, 2007, 11:58:52 PM
One wonders about a lot of things, but not about that. You've clearly not read the book. Neither have I, for that matter, but my library training militates against the suggestion that books should be condemned unread. Go read it (I'll do the same) and then we can share our opinions. Our informed opinions. That'll be fun.

Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Belochka on October 23, 2007, 12:02:04 AM
... As I'm sure you've noticed of late, we have vastly different opinions on a number of matters. In view of that, please refrain in future from presuming to be "sure" of what I agree with.

A conversational expression on my part. Most regretable that its inclusion in my previous post may have offended you.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Belochka on October 23, 2007, 12:08:58 AM
One wonders about a lot of things, but not about that. You've clearly not read the book. Neither have I, for that matter, but my library training militates against the suggestion that books should be condemned unread. Go read it (I'll do the same) and then we can share our opinions. Our informed opinions. That'll be fun.

An exchange and acceptance of differing opinions on this thread, what a novel idea!  
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Sarushka on October 23, 2007, 12:16:11 AM
what a novel idea!  

Pun intended? ;)
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Belochka on October 23, 2007, 12:26:13 AM
what a novel idea!  

Pun intended? ;)

Absolutely!!!   :D
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Ilana on October 23, 2007, 12:01:29 PM
Read it, thanks Lisa, had some merits... it was okay.  Probably would have liked it a lot if I had read it at 14...
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Divia on October 23, 2007, 03:15:30 PM
Well I'll confess I havent read it and until a week or so ago I didnt know it even exsisted.  That being said I have read more historical fiction than I wish to confess. I also write it.  I'm not and never have been one to get their knickers in a knot if an author decides to take creative liberties and change somethings. In fact, I daresay there are few HF novels that I have read that havent taken liberties. Philipa Gregory does it quite frequently. Caroly Erickson does as it as well. Now if it is good or not that is a different discussion.

Frankly, it matters little to me if the events are all true or not. And if the author wrote a little summary at the end saying it wasnt then what is the problem. The point is this is a YA book and if just one of my patrons reads it, likes it and wants to read more on the Romanovs or anyone else..or wishes to read more historical fiction then I say excellent. The author succeeded in their job and as a librarian I am pleased.

Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: LisaDavidson on October 23, 2007, 06:24:58 PM
... except it did appeal to me. Here's why: any fantasy which takes the Family out of their bleak circumstances during the war or exile and imprisonment to me is welcome. But, I, too was uncomfortable with the license.

The "bleak curcumstances" were indeed real and IMHO to provide a gloss to these realities for the sake of novel does not provide me with just a modicum of discomfort.

Margarita

... It's not a matter of glossing over what really happened, it's altering facts

I think that Orthodox Christians may object to saints in their church being depicted as fictional characters. And others may object for their own reasons.

However, many of us live in free societies where we are able to make such decisions for ourselves as to whether or not to purchase or read a book. If you are able to make such decisions for yourself, you may consider all the information on this thread in making your decision.

One does not necessarily have to be a member of the Orthodox Church to be repelled by tasteless fiction such as this. As you have correctly written other factors can also contribute to one's objections.

However I do thank you in permitting me the freedom to "consider all the information on this thread".

Margarita

While I am a proud descendant of the patriot Samuel Adams, I have nothing whatsoever to do with granting you (or anyone else) freedoms in making one's own decisions.

I made the remark about Orthodox Christians because we have many of that faith who post here and also are readers of YA fiction. I did not characterize the book as "tasteless". If this is your opinion, have you read the book?
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Helen_Azar on October 23, 2007, 06:42:54 PM
I think that Orthodox Christians may object to saints in their church being depicted as fictional characters.

They may object, but the Russian imperial family members are historical characters before they are RO saints, so that makes them fair game for historical fiction (good, bad and mediocre, just like all other historical characters... 
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Divia on October 23, 2007, 08:14:17 PM
I think that Orthodox Christians may object to saints in their church being depicted as fictional characters.

They may object, but the Russian imperial family members are historical characters before they are RO saints, so that makes them fair game for historical fiction (good, bad and mediocre, just like all other historical characters... 

Indeed it does. Besides that there are many books written about saints. For example:
The King's nun
The Barefoot Girl
Sister Teresa
Warrior Girl(Joan of Arc)

Futhermore, there are books/comics about the Catholic Church. If one objects due to religious reasons and cannot read a book, then so be it. But that doesnt mean said book shouldn't be written. If that were the case then a great deal many books wouldnt be written..
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: LisaDavidson on October 24, 2007, 01:00:53 PM
To be clear, I am okay with saints being part of the world of fiction. Not everyone is. In order to be tolerant, one must consider that there are many differing points of view.

What I said was - and I am sorry this is not clearer - we have many young adult readers who frequent the Forum. Many of these young adults are also Orthodox Christians. I was letting them know that this may be objectionable to some of them, or perhaps their parents. It is not objectionable to me personally. I was only seeking to inform which is after all one of the duties of a moderator.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Divia on October 24, 2007, 04:03:43 PM
I think you would be quite shocked by what teens read. Do you know how many girls come to me and say "I want a book about rape." 


But I can understand you wanting to give them the heads up to make their own decision.

:)
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: LisaDavidson on October 24, 2007, 04:30:47 PM
I think you would be quite shocked by what teens read. Do you know how many girls come to me and say "I want a book about rape." 


But I can understand you wanting to give them the heads up to make their own decision.

:)

Actually, I wouldn't be - I am the mother of two teenage girls and their friends also spend alot of time at our home. I encourage our daughters to read widely and extensively. We also encourage them to make their own decisions, which is of course a decidedly mixed blessing, as many parents know.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Divia on October 24, 2007, 08:37:47 PM
You, are a rarity, but as a librarian you would be the type of parent I would want in my corner.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Helen_Azar on October 26, 2007, 01:51:44 PM
I am a librarian too but thankfully I don't have to work with teens! :-p ;-)  But you are right, I think reading a book like this one, although it may not be ideal, it certainly beats some other ones they may choose to read...
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Louis_Charles on November 01, 2007, 09:29:35 AM
So I ordered it and read it. The premise is no worse than several other books with similar themes (i.e. time travel --- in particular the "Mr. Wicker" series by Carley Dawson, now sadly out of print) but the writing itself is clunky, and the plot is completely dependent upon soap-opera coincidence. I don't want to spoil anything, but there is one plot element in particular that should send you right over the edge, Margarita. Even for a work of fantasy, there is no internal logic at all. But the odd thing is that the author includes pages and pages giving the correct history of the Romanovs and the Revolution, and it is very clear from throwaway lines in the book that she has more than done her homework. Very frustrating that she would produce this and not something that could actually educate.

My favorite part? That Alexei meets and falls in love with someone named "Varda Rosenberg", and that he is test-messaging just before the trip to the cellar. In slang.

Okay, Margarita. Your turn.

Simon
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Belochka on November 01, 2007, 07:35:44 PM
So I ordered it and read it.

Okay, Margarita. Your turn.

Simon

My final impression extended to firmly closing the cover of the book and then discarding it in a less than ceremonious manner into the garbage bin (not even considering it worthy for environmental recycling).

Margarita
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Louis_Charles on November 01, 2007, 09:15:29 PM
So you read it?
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Louis_Charles on November 03, 2007, 06:58:19 AM
I'll take that as a "no", then.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: dmitri on November 04, 2007, 06:37:13 AM
It sounds like complete and utter rubbish. Margarita is a very good judge of these things.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Louis_Charles on November 04, 2007, 08:53:30 AM
You forgot to mention that Anna Anderson was a fraud, Dmitri. You're slowing down.

Margarita has not read the book, which means that her opinion  is flawed. Although delivered with proper aristocratic disdain.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: dmitri on November 04, 2007, 01:35:42 PM
How bizarre.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Louis_Charles on November 04, 2007, 07:47:49 PM
What, that she would condemn a book that she has not read? I know. I agree, but what are we two against so many, Dmitri?
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Grand Duchess Marishka on June 09, 2008, 07:41:29 AM
I liked and didn't like this book. I can't really explain why...It might just be that I don't mind historical fiction, even when the author takes an insane amount of liberties. I think what mainly bothered me was the overuse of irony.

The author obviously knew what she was talking about (what with all the references and "fact or fiction" bits? in the back of her book), but much of the story seemed too ironic. I won't give any spoilers or anything, but the fact of the matter is that everything just seemed too coincidental. I liked the characters--I did--though I also think they could have been fleshed out a little more.

I don't recommend this to any hardcore Romanov fans mainly because I think people might be offended by various concepts in the book. (Even I was offended by some!) But if you read it as a fiction (with familiar people as the main characters), rather than a generally historically accurate story, you might be all right. All I can say is that it's certainly not Robert Alexander's "Kitchen Boy".
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: LisaDavidson on June 09, 2008, 12:33:12 PM
I liked and didn't like this book. I can't really explain why...It might just be that I don't mind historical fiction, even when the author takes an insane amount of liberties. I think what mainly bothered me was the overuse of irony.

The author obviously knew what she was talking about (what with all the references and "fact or fiction" bits? in the back of her book), but much of the story seemed too ironic. I won't give any spoilers or anything, but the fact of the matter is that everything just seemed too coincidental. I liked the characters--I did--though I also think they could have been fleshed out a little more.

I don't recommend this to any hardcore Romanov fans mainly because I think people might be offended by various concepts in the book. (Even I was offended by some!) But if you read it as a fiction (with familiar people as the main characters), rather than a generally historically accurate story, you might be all right. All I can say is that it's certainly not Robert Alexander's "Kitchen Boy".

These are some great insights!

I, too, became annoyed at improbable plot points and limited character development. I probably would have been less annoyed had the author seemed less knowledgable about the period and the historical persons involved.

And, Simon, I too, do not consider that an unread book is something I would comment on or review. I have read some horrific books on the Romanovs, but the thing is, I did read them.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: amartin71718 on June 18, 2008, 04:42:27 PM
I just finished reading this book. It was pretty good, except for a few wierd parts.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: amartin71718 on June 18, 2008, 05:25:56 PM
In other words, one hasn't read the book. Well, that's fine. One must make do with what one must make do.

I'm just guessing that the vampire novel in which Tatiana becomes a neck-biter after Rasputin, who is a VAMPIRE! bites her won't be one's cup of tea, either. Anyone else read that thing? It was hilarious. Tatiana teams up with Lord Byron (also a VAMPIRE!) and they fight the bad vampires.

I read it years ago, can't remember the author or title. Can anyone help? Anyone? Bueller? Anyone?
Tatiana? A vampire? What will they think of next?
Title: Time Travel story with Alexei and Rasputin (seems foul)
Post by: rosieposie on February 16, 2010, 07:19:37 AM
Hey guys while looking for Romanov books on Amazon I came across this book title "Curse of the Romanovs".   Now I could be biased as I watched a time travelling show back in the mid/late 90s titled Mirror Mirror (an Australian series) where one of the main characters is Alexei who goes by the name Nicholas to protect his identity. 

Anyways after reading the summary it seems like a Romanov fanfiction mixed with subplot of Anastasia (1997).

I don't think this woman has done any research on the Romanovs just outlining basics. LOL.

http://www.amazon.com/Curse-Romanovs-Staton-Rabin/dp/1416902082/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1266325591&sr=8-6
Title: Re: Time Travel story with Alexei and Rasputin (seems foul)
Post by: Ilana on February 16, 2010, 10:38:02 AM
A much better time travel involving the Imperial Family is called TIME AFTER TIME by Allen Appel.  It's out of print, but it's nicely written and lots of fun.
Title: Re: Curse of the Romanovs, by Staton Rabin
Post by: Gorseheart on June 17, 2010, 09:06:22 PM
I enjoyed this book. I don't wanna spoil it, but it had ups and downs like any Historical Fiction.