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Messages - BingandNelsonFan

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31
Research Russian Roots / Re: Dr. Anton Lukic Zuk of Russia and Zagreb
« on: August 26, 2015, 05:40:48 PM »
Hi, again! Thanks so much for continuing to help with this. :)

I was finally able to get a scan of the whole article about Dr. Anton Lukic Zuk from the "Encyclopedia of American Biography" (instead of deciphering from the Google Book Snippet View!), and it says that Dr. Anton Zuk was born in Kiev, Ukraine, Russia. It says that his father was "Luska" Zuk. Would that be another Croatian spelling?

I don't know why it says that the gymnasium was called "L.A. Zuk Gymnasium", since it states clearly in the very next sentence that Luska's brother was Vladimir Nikolajevic Zuk. There are a couple of spelling errors in other parts of the article, so this may just be an error.

I'll keep posting with anything that I can find! Thanks again!

32
Research Russian Roots / Re: Dr. Anton Lukic Zuk of Russia and Zagreb
« on: August 25, 2015, 06:02:40 PM »
Hi, again! I have just come across two references from 1895 and 1899 that list a Nikolai Nikolaievich Zuk as an Instructor at the University of Kiev. It seems quite possible to me that this could be another uncle to Dr. Anton Zuk and a brother of Luka and Vladimir. If anyone finds any connection between these men, I'd be interested. Thanks!

33
Research Russian Roots / Re: Dr. Anton Lukic Zuk of Russia and Zagreb
« on: August 25, 2015, 03:18:50 PM »
Thanks for all of this help!

The place where I was able to get any info here was the "Encyclopedia of American Biography" from 1967. That is the place that listed the connection to the Gymnasium. The link that you sent was great, as I really appreciated seeing the photo of the building. Wow!

We had always heard that the family name was changed from "Zukarelli", but now looking into it, that is totally wrong. They were definitely Russian, and your explanation of the name is most helpful!

34
Research Russian Roots / Dr. Anton Lukic Zuk of Russia and Zagreb
« on: August 24, 2015, 03:40:19 PM »
I am trying to learn about the family of Dr. Anton Lukic Zuk, M.D., the specialist on bacteriology and hygiene. He was born in Russia on June 25, 1898. I do not know his father's name, though I believe that it was "Lukic". He was born at Kiev on January 20, 1853. He was professor of science and director of the first gymnasium at Kiev. According to one source, that gymnasium was later named in his honor as the "L.A. Zuk Gymnasium". All that I know about his wife is that her name was listed as Anastasija Vasiljeikova.

Dr. Anton Zuk married in Zagreb in 1929. His wife was Antika Cubelic. She was the daughter of Zvonimir Cubelic and Terezija Hochsinger. Zvonimir Cubelic was the state finance counselor in Zagreb. I believe that they only had two children.

Dr. Anton Zuk left Zagreb in 1956 and came to the United States. He lived in Cleveland, Ohio, and worked at Fairview Hospital until his death on July 26, 1967. His ashes were taken back to Zagreb and buried in a family plot in Mirogoj.

This is what I know about the family of Dr. Anton Zuk. Any help and additional info would be most appreciated. I would be very interested to know where in Russia he was born. Any information on his parents would be of great interest, too! These are relatives of mine, but I don't have a lot to go on.

I do know that Dr. Anton Zuk's uncle was Vladimir Nikolaievich Zuk, M.D., and served as professor of pediatrics at St. Petersburg, Kiev and Odessa.

Thanks in advance for any help!

35
Yes, over nine years between 1905-1914 John Epps collected every letter, card and drawing he received from the OTMA.

It is interesting to know when it was? When (in what year?) was Fanny Carter nurse to Grand Duchess Olga?

I don't actually know what year it was, because they didn't bother to write that on the back of the photo (where they did write the story of who was who). However, I do know that Serge and Eleanor Plaoutine's first child was born in 1868, and the last one was born in 1875. It says that Fanny came first as Nurse-Maid, then as Nurse, before being asked for by the Empress. Also, Eleanor Plaoutine seems to have employed nurses for her grandchildren, as well, the oldest of whom was born in 1893 and the youngest in 1906. Fanny may have served as nurse for any of those children.

If I can supply any more info, I'd be happy to do so!
Sarah

36
Thank you SO much! Those links are fabulous and just what I was looking for. I could not get that to come up through Google searches. All of those costumes are amazing. I cannot imagine how colorful they must all have been, but I think that there is something almost more exciting about them in black and white. It leaves more room for the imagination. :) Thanks!

37
Исторический бал 1903 года: https://fotki.yandex.ru/users/hor-j/album/110056/? 10 pages of photos.

Book about the ball: http://www.thorntonsbooks.co.uk/Costumeball.html

Thank you SO much! Those photos are great! I have just looked through the first page and will have to go through all the rest. Such beautiful costumes. The book looks fabulous. How cool that it even includes the seating at dinner. I wish that I could see that book!

Regards,
Sarah

38
Their World and Culture / 1903 Fancy Dress Ball at the Winter Palace
« on: April 04, 2015, 06:58:58 AM »
Hi! I am not at all sure where to post this, so I apologize if I've selected the wrong board.

Having been going through several large "coffee table" books about Imperial Russia, I have run across about five photos from the 1903 Ball at the Winter Palace. One of the books that I had stated that over 400 people were invited. Another mentions that there were photo albums dedicated to the Ball itself. Does anyone know if the guest list survived? Also, is there a way to see the photos taken there, other than the same four or five that seem to be commonly repeated? I would LOVE to see more of the costumes, and it would be quite intriguing to know who was actually there. Was it only Royalty? Or were there friends, too?

Thanks!
Sarah

39
It was the collector Sergey Alexandrovich Shcherbatov (1875 - 1962) who built this building, which really was an apartment complex with a large mansion for the Prince. It's known as Щербатовский особняк на Новинском бульваре - the Shcherbatov Mansion on Novinskiy Boulevard.

Thank you so much! I appreciate the info. I was able to look him up and read about him. How sad that he lost everything.

40
Thanks! Great! Do you know which Prince Sherbatov lived there? I have been researching Prince Sergei Borisovich and his wife, Elizaveta Plaoutine. They also lived in Smolensk, so I am wondering if this was a relative.

Thanks!
Sarah

41
Well, if I find out who wrote it, I'll certainly be posting. Let's hope someone comes along who knows. ;) It is gripping!

42
I have run across this book (and a few references to it) on GoogleBooks. It is called "From a Russian Diary, 1917-1920". The author is just listed as "an Englishwoman". Events seem to be all from the Moscow area with Smolensk. Here's the link to the book:

https://books.google.com/books?id=StNBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PR1&lpg=PR1&dq=%22From+a+Russian+Diary,+1917-1920%22&source=bl&ots=UbbBv-ODZP&sig=NsH5FTtjNabxQr0dvPSX3N9tm5k&hl=en&sa=X&ei=H2sAVa3FLYGeyATk3oCQAw&ved=0CDYQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=%22From%20a%20Russian%20Diary%2C%201917-1920%22&f=false

Does anyone know which "Prince Scherbatoff" is referred to here on page 173:
Last night we heard of three big burglaries which had taken place the previous night. In two cases a haul of 500,000 roubles was made, in the third 1,500,000. The last was in the big house of Prince Scherbatoff, on the boulevard, which is being used by the Bolsheviks as one of their centres. The Red Guard consisted of over thirty soldiers; the robbers numbered fifteen. They said to the Red Guard: “ We need the money so as to get all of you hanged
later on!”

Thanks!
Sarah

43
Hi! I have run across this book (and a few references to it) on GoogleBooks. It is called "From a Russian Diary, 1917-1920". The author is just listed as "an Englishwoman". Events seem to be all from the Moscow area with Smolensk. Does anybody know if it was ever discovered who was writing this book? Here's the link to the book:

https://books.google.com/books?id=StNBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PR1&lpg=PR1&dq=%22From+a+Russian+Diary,+1917-1920%22&source=bl&ots=UbbBv-ODZP&sig=NsH5FTtjNabxQr0dvPSX3N9tm5k&hl=en&sa=X&ei=H2sAVa3FLYGeyATk3oCQAw&ved=0CDYQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=%22From%20a%20Russian%20Diary%2C%201917-1920%22&f=false

Also, anyone know which "Prince Scherbatoff" is referred to here on page 173:
Last night we heard of three big burglaries which had taken place the previous night. In two cases a haul of 500,000 roubles was made, in the third 1,500,000. The last was in the big house of Prince Scherbatoff, on the boulevard, which is being used by the Bolsheviks as one of their centres. The Red Guard consisted of over thirty soldiers; the robbers numbered fifteen. They said to the Red Guard: “ We need the money so as to get all of you hanged
later on!”


Thanks!
Sarah

44
NB the Russian terms for aides-de-camp are derived from German:
Aide-de-camp: Адъютант / adyutant < Adjutant
Флигель-адъютант / fligel-adyutant < Flügeladjutant (litterally Wing Aide-de-camp)
Генерал-адъютант / general-adyutant < Generaladjutant

If Plaoutine was a Major-General he must have been a Fliegel-Adyutant, as General-Adyutant was limited to officers of the three highest ranks in the Table of Ranks.

Thanks to all responding on this!
You are right about Plaoutine's rank, since he was listed as A.D.C. already at the rank of Colonel.

45
Hi! This photo is marked "Tsarskoe Selo 1893". Can anyone identify the building? The children are a niece and nephew of Gen. Plaoutine (shown with their Nanny). Thanks!


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