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Messages - Maria Sisi

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31
I saw it on youtube yesterday (channel appropriately named TSARS) and it was okay. It was pretty much a fluff piece, not very heavy on dates and information. It was more cultural related then hard history events. I suppose you could call it cliff notes or something like that. Something that could be used in school for young students (12 under) as an introduction to Russian history. Visually it was beautiful. 

On a shallow note Lucy is very easy on the eyes and ears. She gives off very warm and friendly vibes.

Yeah , very fluffy . She is good at the cultural - travelogue stuff , but is incapable of moving or electrifying her audience as the best historians do. Lets see how she handles the events of the Revolution . I just hope she doesn't dress up as a Cossack or as Lenin or whatever...but she probably will.

Then the next episode, which focuses on Catherine, should be great. It's clear from the preview there will be a lot of talk about her building mania and the vast art collection she obsessively gathered.

Not sure if its true or not but I read once in a book that at one auction in London Catherine had purchased so many paintings by a big name artist (I sadly can't remember who) that the government changed laws because they couldn't understand how so many pieces of work by that big an artist could be purchased by the Russians.

32
I saw it on youtube yesterday (channel appropriately named TSARS) and it was okay. It was pretty much a fluff piece, not very heavy on dates and information. It was more cultural related then hard history events. I suppose you could call it cliff notes or something like that. Something that could be used in school for young students (12 under) as an introduction to Russian history. Visually it was beautiful. 

On a shallow note Lucy is very easy on the eyes and ears. She gives off very warm and friendly vibes.

33
Alexandra Feodorovna / Re: Her Accent
« on: January 07, 2016, 03:25:18 PM »
Queen Victoria was definitely not anti-German. She was as pro-German as one in her position could be.

She originally wanted a German wife for Bertie and only settled on Alexandra when they realized the German princesses weren't going to cut it. She was one of the few who were okay with how Prussia acted towards Denmark. While she disliked Prussia's treatment of the other German states and Austria she still supported them more so then everybody else.

And most of all she would have been horrified with the Russian British alliance Bertie set up. She NEVER would have considered it. While she may have been frustrated with Germany at times for not doing as she saw they should do she most definitely would have taken their side over Russia and France.

34
A coffee table book on the Marrinsky Ballet pre-1917.

A social season in St Petersburg. Description of the parties and balls and a who's who in society.

35
The Habsburgs / Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part V.
« on: January 06, 2016, 02:42:26 PM »
The illustrations are interesting.

Considering her fame was centered on her famous beauty and thinness its a mystery as to why they make her look rather heavy and fat in so many of them. Many of them look nothing like her.

36
The Russian Revolution / Re: Kerensky Hero or Villlian of the Revolution
« on: December 28, 2015, 05:02:31 PM »
Thanks for your response Rodney!

I actually knew the majority of what was written and have no problem believing it but reading it all in two short paragraphs instead of a much longer book/essay really hit home just what a disaster he was.

It was the drug part that really threw me off and made me question everything. I didn't know about that. I know a lot of false information about Nicholas and Alexandra get published over and over even in current sources so I was just wondering if the same was true of Kerensky in this instance but I guess not.

37
The Russian Revolution / Re: Kerensky Hero or Villlian of the Revolution
« on: December 28, 2015, 10:08:23 AM »
Yikes

Not the most flattering portrait of Mr. Kerensky that's for sure. Is all of that actually true? Because it almost reads as history written by the Soviets.


38
Having Fun! / Re: Then and now (Locations, clothes, etc)
« on: December 22, 2015, 05:09:45 PM »
These are remarkable.The survival and mostly good appearance of these places, both buildings and their  natural physical settings,often from more than a century ago, is striking to me. That they have done so after experiencing two devastating wars and a revolution and civil war in some cases is almost unbelievable.

I' ve seen photos of my small typical American hometown from  about sixty years before my time there and  it seems to have changed more than have early twentieth century Central Europe and Russia.
Great job ,Bryndis!

Well it was mainly the Nazi that did the real damage. Before that everything seem to be well preserved and mostly respected. Chances are it would have continued. Can you imagine what it would look like if the Nazi never stepped foot there! It's rather amazing that despite how well it looks now it could have been even more so.  

And your right about the America and Europe thing. It seems like in the United States when they make change they go full force and leave very little of the former in its path. The only thing left are the pictures and film. In Europe on the the other hand they seem to have done a wonderful job blending the modern with the old.

39
Presumably all the sisters with their respective husbands, and Ernst Ludwig by himself between marriages.

Ann

Poor Ernst being the odd man out. How awkward that must have been even if they probably didn't speak of it.

40

I work at Hillwood and am not sure what exhibition you are referring to....My understanding is that it is intended to accompany forthcoming exhibitions in Europe. Helga Ausrisch, the author of the book in question, gave a lecture on it at Hillwood last month. I was not able to attend, but from what I heard from colleagues, it was very interesting.

That's right it was just a speaking lecture. I forgot to remove that part after I read it more specifically.

I just ordered it from Hoogstraten so I'm excited to receive it. The essays look pretty interesting and I'm looking forward to reading the one connected with Worth. I already own the National Portrait Gallery book but the binding it starting to look a little fragile so I don't touch it as much.

41
I heard about this. Thrilling to see that its finally coming!

I hope the current political climate doesn't taint it though. Western documentaries on Russia in general tend to be slanted with a subtle, and sometimes not so subtle, over criticism. I don't want any sunshine and roses but it would be nice if they show some objectivity and realize they act a certain way because their ways, thought process, are different. It would be nice if they could put themselves in someone else's shoes and not judge by their standards which are different.

Don't count on it . I  suspect the series will  be worth watching if only for  being visually stunning (palaces , Faberge , etc) . Ideally I would have preferred other BBC stalwarts to have been involved  ; Helen Castor to present a History - she is a far more impartial and austere historian than Worsley ; and then Andrew Graham Dixon to present an 'Art of the Romanovs' documentary  - he is light years beyond Worsley in his appreciation of all things artistic. Still , beggars can't be choosers....

Frankly if its going to be that bad I'd rather have none at all.

Your description means it will be the typical autocratic Romanovs live in splendor while the people live suppressed and in poverty. Of course that's pretty much what it was but I have no doubt the tone will most likely be unbearable. To me tone is what makes or breaks it for a documentary. You can deliver the same information without sounding snotty or judgmental and judging from past British productions that feature the Romanovs it probably will be.

That's why "Russia's Lost Princesses" was a pleasant surprise. It gave the information but it didn't have that judgmental edge to it. It simply presented the facts with some nice visuals. 

I'll watch if I can but I don't have high hopes for it.


42
Does any one know when it will be shown in USA?


Eva McDonald

To be honest I'm not holding my breath on that one. I'll be shocked if it ever does. I'm just hoping it can be found online and then get a DVD release.

I know it wasn't perfect but I'm still upset that "Russia's Lost Princesses" never got a DVD release.

43
I heard about this. Thrilling to see that its finally coming!

I hope the current political climate doesn't taint it though. Western documentaries on Russia in general tend to be slanted with a subtle, and sometimes not so subtle, over criticism. I don't want any sunshine and roses but it would be nice if they show some objectivity and realize they act a certain way because their ways, thought process, are different. It would be nice if they could put themselves in someone else's shoes and not judge by their standards which are different.

44
Indeed...I would love to publish them in hardback and tons of photos from the EUROHISTORY Collection!

Does anyone know how to contact Stephen?




I bought both volumes of Maria Feodorovna's diaries so I'll describe mine and I hope it helps a little. I believe on the bookemon site you can sample some of the books. What you see there is pretty much what you will mostly get. I wouldn't expect anything too fancy as its an small independent company printing on demand type of thing.

I don't know Russian so I can't say if the translation is perfect or not but I believe other posters in other threads have mentioned that his translations are overall pretty accurate. There were a few spelling errors but not too many, they are kept at a minimum.

The books are an oversized paperback so that's probably why the one your looking at has only 328 pages compared to the 560 original. There is therefore more writing on each page. Mine are very stable and don't show any fragileness so there should be no worry about them falling apart unless you're careless with them.

They have no index or biblio but there are footnotes at the bottom of each page that tell what specific people and events the Dowager Empress was referring to. The cover is glossy and the paper inside is of real nice quality. The ink is thick dark black so while it goes well with the visibility of the written words the black and white illustrations did not come off that well and were not that great.

I hope that helps a little and hopefully someone else can tell you more. I think Mr. De Angelis did a great job with the resources he had and it would be wonderful if he could collaborate with a publisher like Eurohistory so that his hard work can reach a wider audience.






His name on bookemon, where he sells his translations, is doubrovka. You could probably send him a message though there, although I think you have to set up a bookemon account and ask to be his friend in order to do so, I'm not sure. Laura Mabee linked his profile on the first post of the thread. He seems to have posted a number of new books in the last few months, his latest only 4 days ago, so he has been active.

45
I was browsing through Hoogstraten's website and found the addition of a new exhibition catalog. Its based on the exhibition from last November in Washington D.C. at the Hillwood museum (did anyone see it?).



description from amazon
Quote
Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873) was the most renowned portraitist of European aristocracy of his day, expertly capturing the refinement and opulence of his distinguished sitters. Born and trained in Germany, Winterhalter settled in Paris in 1834, where he became the official court painter to King Louis-Philippe. He gained such international acclaim for his state portraits that he painted all but a few of the monarchs in Europe. In Paris in 1855, at the pinnacle of his career, he painted the noble portrait Empress Eugénie and her Ladies-in-Waiting, which would go on to symbolise an entire era. His 1865 portrait of the Austrian Empress Sissi is also known the world over. The lavishly illustrated publication complements Winterhalter's magnificent portraits of crowned heads of state with selected items of clothing by the contemporary and sought-after couturier Charles Frederick Worth.

Contents:
Director's Foreword; Acknowledgments; Lenders to the Exhibition; Introduction by Richard Ormond; The Ultimate Court Painter by Helga Kessler Aurisch; Franz Xaver Winterhalter and the Black Forest by Tilmann von Stockhausen; Winterhalter's Italian Interlude by Eugene Barilo von Reisberg; Franz Xaver Winterhalter and French Painting: Echoes of the Salon by Laure Chabanne; Franz Xaver Winterhalter: Painter of Women by Mirja Straub; The Confections of Winterhalter and Worth by Elizabeth Ann Coleman; The Plates; Select Bibliography; Index.

The only book on Winterhalter that I know of is Richard Ormond's exhibition book for the National Portrait Gallery in the late 80s so its exciting to see another one! Its hardback, in English, and has 256 pages. Amazon will start selling it at the end of January, 2016 but you can pre-order it at the moment for $70.

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