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Messages - Sarushka

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46
One that's likely to be overlooked by adult readers is The Family Romanov, by Candace Fleming. Don't let the fact that it's aimed at a younger audience deter you -- it's a concise, well-researched, and compelling introduction not only to Nicholas II's family, but also the living conditions and political situation that propelled ordinary Russians to overthrow the Romanovs.

47
Olga Nicholaievna / Re: Olga Photographs IV
« on: December 30, 2014, 08:39:51 AM »

What does that Cyrillic word in the right hand upper corner say? Either in English or transliterated?

It looks to me like meshepid' (transliterated), but I'm not great with Russian handwriting, so second opinions are welcome!

48
The Imperial Family / Re: Imp. Family/Romanov's Family's Pets Links List
« on: December 29, 2014, 09:16:45 AM »
Aleksei's dog, named Shot:



Source: https://fotki.yandex.ru/users/eavm/album/452599/

49
The Final Chapter / Re: last Tsars Killers
« on: December 16, 2014, 09:20:28 PM »
The only source alleged so far for Yurovsky's regret over his murder of Nicholas and his family is FOTR. The scholarship and reliability  of that tome is seriously questionable, to put it mildly.

Although I myself take issue with a number of the claims put forth in FOTR, one thing that is absolutely reliable is the source notes. Regardless of what you think of King & Wilson's perspective on the Romanovs, their notes will always allow you to investigate their sources further and form your own conclusions.


The source is Francis McCullagh, A Prisoner of the Reds: The Story of a British Officer Captured in Siberia, London, John Murray Publishers, 1921, page 142

You must have posted this literally as I was reaching for my copy of FOTR -- thanks for saving me the trouble of tracking the info down!

50
The Final Chapter / Re: last Tsars Killers
« on: December 16, 2014, 11:16:07 AM »
Yourovsky repented in the end. After the murders he drove to Moscow and brought all that was found in the bodies. When he arrived in Moscow he expected to be received as an hero. Lenin never saw him and he was given a job in the archives. His mother died of starvation in Ekaterinburg. His daughter was arrested and sent to Siberia, he asked for Belodorov's help, but nothing was done. He died without seeing his daughter. I think he told his son how much he regretted to have shot the tsar.


Despite what you might have read in FOTR, the information is not correct. Yurovsky never repented.

He was a proud Bolshevik and a coldblooded murderer who had conducted a specific job for comrade Lenin.

In this context it matters little that he failed to see his daughter, before he drew his last breath.


Can I ask each of you what your sources are for these assertions, so the rest of us can investigate and assess the opposing viewpoints for ourselves?

51
Tsarevich Alexei Nicholaievich / Re: Alexei anecdotes
« on: December 16, 2014, 11:09:00 AM »
Hmm, so that anecdote about Alexei is false. I thought as much.

Minzlov wrote other anecdotes of the IF. You can see them here: http://www.unz.org/Pub/LivingAge-1924jul26-00161

Since Alexei's anecdote proved to be wrong, I wonder if the rest is unreliable too. I'd like to have your opinions on it. Thank you very much in advance for your answers.


This hasn't been proved wrong. Belochka's opinion is that it is false -- and she may well be correct -- but we haven't been offered proof to discredit the story.

Why is it that an absurd anecdote such as this one has to be proven to be false? 

Surely common sense should override Minzlov's published anecdote, given that any trauma sustained by Alexei might have induced a medical event?


Because it's good scholarship to do so. The incident is far-fetched, but it's not impossible. The tsar's reaction is highly questionable, but the behavior that allegedly prompted it is plausible -- we do have incontrovertible evidence of Aleksei being physically rough with people around him. None of us were there, and in the heat of the moment people occasionally do things that are otherwise out of character. Furthermore, threat of a whipping is not the same as a whipping itself, and would not have induced a medical event.

Without proof, none of us has the authority to assert that this particular anecdote never occurred. We can say there's no evidence to support the tsar's reaction, that it flies in the face of just about everything we know about his character, and that given Aleksei's medical condition it was an empty threat and therefore very likely apocryphal or at least exaggerated. (That's the most reasonable assessment, IMO.)

On the other hand, do we know if Nicholas II was morally opposed to corporal punishment of his children? Wan't it very much the norm at that time? Is it really so difficult to imagine that a father, frustrated by his son's bad behavior and his own inability to punish the boy effectively might momentarily snap and bark out such a threat?

It's improbable, but not impossible. To my mind, that's a very important distinction. Too often we forget that no matter how carefully we study these people, we cannot fully know them.

52
The Final Chapter / Re: last Tsars Killers
« on: December 15, 2014, 06:22:03 PM »

as for the others no one knows what happened to them, but I don't think they lived to old ages
Alexei Karbonov
Viktor Netrebiv
Michael Kurdin
Jan Tsel'ms not Solems Latvian

According to Ispoved' Tsareubiits, Aleksei Georgievich Kabanov died in 1975. (pg 115)


I think Kudrin ( Mikhail Medvedev) lived til the mid 1960s and died of natural causes, unremorseful to the end.

Ispoved' Tsareubiits gives his year of death as 1964. (pg 163)

53
Tsarevich Alexei Nicholaievich / Re: Alexei anecdotes
« on: December 15, 2014, 06:07:47 PM »
Hmm, so that anecdote about Alexei is false. I thought as much.

Minzlov wrote other anecdotes of the IF. You can see them here: http://www.unz.org/Pub/LivingAge-1924jul26-00161

Since Alexei's anecdote proved to be wrong, I wonder if the rest is unreliable too. I'd like to have your opinions on it. Thank you very much in advance for your answers.


This hasn't been proved wrong. Belochka's opinion is that it is false -- and she may well be correct -- but we haven't been offered proof to discredit the story.

54
Olga Nicholaievna / Re: Olga Photographs IV
« on: December 03, 2014, 04:37:54 PM »
What room is Olga in in her sickbed picture? I know at one point she was moved to a real bed in the sickroom, but we can see here that she's still in her cot. So the bedroom she shared with Tatiana, then?

The print on the screen behind her cot matches other photos of the bedroom she shared with Tatiana at the AP.

55
Having Fun! / Re: Rare Pictures XIII
« on: November 24, 2014, 11:10:05 AM »
I love that photo of the Big Pair, Karin!

I think that may be Tatiana and Maria. Always hard to be certain between O&M at this age.

56
Having Fun! / Re: Did the Romanov kids read L Frank Baum?
« on: November 13, 2014, 08:46:13 AM »
I've never run across any mention of Baum's work in the IF's papers.

57
The Alexander Palace / Re: Help ID-ing various rooms
« on: October 15, 2014, 08:30:15 AM »
I have it cataloged as "Empress Alexandra in the Mauve Boudoir of Alexander Palace, Tsarskoe Selo, 1909." I don't remember where that description came from but it has always been a reliable source in the past.

I had a second look, and I don't think it can be the Mauve Boudoir. The empress's boudoir had striped fabric on the walls, and very light woodwork. The room in question has solid-colored walls and very dark paneling.

58
The Alexander Palace / Re: Help ID-ing various rooms
« on: October 12, 2014, 07:52:16 AM »
My best guess is the Maple room. Or the Palisander room. The upholstery looks most like the Maple room to me, but I can't match that sofa with known furniture in either room. There are a number of photos of Alexandra posing in the Maple room in that dress.

59
Maria Nicholaievna / Re: Maria photos III
« on: October 02, 2014, 10:02:15 PM »
Could the woman be Olga Byutsova, lady-in-waiting to the empress?

Yes, it is.

60
Olga Nicholaievna / Re: Olga Photographs IV
« on: September 17, 2014, 04:40:08 PM »
THAT is a terrific find!

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