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Messages - Alexander1917

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16
Having Fun! / Re: Romanov Paper Doll Book
« on: July 27, 2011, 07:08:55 AM »
I remember a nacked Tsar swimming..lol

paper dolls are a very old playtool - I remember to have some in my childhood and it was easy to cut more clothes. the Romanov is not the only one - I bought some years ago a Princess Magret, a Queen etc. What I fun would this to have it as child

17
The Windsors / Re: Zara & Peter Phillips
« on: July 27, 2011, 07:05:12 AM »
Does anyone know of any information about the wedding this weekend? Not much news coming out about it even though it is classified as a private family affair.

Majesty Magazine state the church as Canongate Kirk in Edinburgh.

18
The Alexander Palace / Re: Alexandra's Mauve Room
« on: July 25, 2011, 05:36:05 PM »
I couldn't find either, but google doesn't like me :P I figured FA might know...

lol.. my pc dosn't like me at all!!!!!!

love to have a piece of that silk..

19
The Alexander Palace / Re: Alexandra's Mauve Room
« on: July 25, 2011, 02:22:41 PM »
The Mauve Room was stripped totally down by the Soviets and nothing was left at all.  Bob has a swatch of the original fabric given to him by Kotchumov so we know the color, and the original manufacturer of the fabric is still in business in Paris.  The pattern/color is "Lampas Violette". Sadly, to have the re-make it today would cost about 350 Euros per METER!  Bob is consulting with the TSM and providing source documents to help in the current restoration project for the Palace.


does this company have any website?

I didn't find anything :-(

20
The Alexander Palace / Re: Alexandra's Mauve Room
« on: July 24, 2011, 05:07:54 PM »
The Mauve Room was stripped totally down by the Soviets and nothing was left at all.  Bob has a swatch of the original fabric given to him by Kotchumov so we know the color, and the original manufacturer of the fabric is still in business in Paris.  The pattern/color is "Lampas Violette". Sadly, to have the re-make it today would cost about 350 Euros per METER!  Bob is consulting with the TSM and providing source documents to help in the current restoration project for the Palace.


it's nice to hear that the firm still exists. of course it's enourmous sum for 1m, but on the other hand a fund for the amber romm (of course more famous than the AP) worked too. and I remeber some rich russians paid for the wooden floor renovations in Peterhof.

any information when the rooms will reopen?

22
Alexandra Feodorovna / Re: Alexandra's embroidery techniques
« on: July 20, 2011, 05:41:40 PM »
Forgive my ignorance please.  Over the decades there have been many sales of jewelry, dishes, and other personal effects of the Romanovs, but have there been any of the vast amount of decorative sewing done by royal ladies?  I did see one cushion cover done by Alexandra in pink and golds. It was exquisite.
All the best, Kitt


I have not seen work done by the Romanov women, but there are Royal ladies that have done a great deal in the world of needlework.

Off the top of my head, the Royal ladies who have excelled in the art of needlework are:

Queen Matilda, William the Conqueror’s wife
Catherine of Aragon
Catherine de’ Medici
Mary, Queen of Scotts
Marie, Queen of Romania

Queen Matilda and her ladies-in-waiting are attributed the creation of the Bayeaux tapestry. Indeed, in France it is occasionally known as "La Tapisserie de la Reine Mathilde" (Tapestry of Queen Matilda).

It was Catherine of Aragon’s love of lace and embroidery combined with keen fashion sense that appealed to the English people, even before she was Queen.  Catherine was educated in many disciplines including the "wifely arts."  She was an accomplished embroiderer and many people believe she herself embroidered some of the King Henry's tunics.  The sudden rise in popularity of the reversible scrolling designs on collars and cuffs was certainly due in part to her influence.  In the early 1500s, Blackwork had a distinctly Spanish feel, which explains why it was often referred to as Spanysshe Work.  The black and white scrolling designs had an obvious Moorish influence, hence the term "arabesque" is often employed in the description of such designs.  Since Catherine spent her formative years in Spain and was exposed to Moorish art, architecture and textiles, it is easy to see how the association between her and Blackwork would be made.  However, it is important to note that she merely helped create fascination with this style of embroidery; she did not invent it.  The Blackwork of this period, looked like lace and was reversible, since both sides would be subject to viewing if it adorned cuffs, coifs and collars.  Hans Holbein the Younger, court painter to Henry VIII, meticulously documented these embroideries.  Holbein was not only the royal portrait artist, he was the person responsible for designing the kings robes, buttons, linens and other household goods.  It was his attention to detail and the unfailing vanity of the nobility, that allows us a look back at this phenomenon and it is in his honor that the double running stitch is also called the Holbein Stitch.

Catherine de ' Medici is noted for bringing lace making from Italy to France where it became a national treasure.  There is also an embroidery stich named for her in Italy, punto madama.  

Mary, Queen of Scotts first experience with embroidery and needlework took place in France, when she was married to Francois II, the Dauphin. Her first mother-in-law, Catherine de Medici was very skilled in the art as were most women in those days of the Renaissance. When she returned to Scotland, she would embroider while participating in her Council’s meetings, but until her period of imprisonment in England, Mary had little time to devote to needlework.

In Lady Katherine Hoare's "The Art of Tatting" (1910), not an instruction book at all but rather a book of inspiration using photos of Lady Hoare's work and the tatting of Marie, Queen of Romania. Queen Marie's work in tatting used real gold and precious gems and pearls (mostly religious items) in the pieces.




not to forget Queen Mary her larged piece, done during her first years of widowhood could be seen her http://www.gallery.ca/en/see/collections/artwork.php?mkey=3562

23
Alexandra Feodorovna / Re: Alexandra's Engagement and Wedding rings
« on: July 18, 2011, 05:39:59 PM »
Same as Constantine & Anne-Marie I think.

infact, royal weddings only!

thanks for the clearification. for me I unterstand as crowns where not used at all.

24
Re  above Post:  Of course, if you reside in the USA, and one's local library does not alternatively have the "hard" volume, and you wish such, it can always be requested by Inter-Library Loan for which you may keep it for a period of 30 days (usually not renewable, though).  The cost is roughly $2US. In addition, if one lives near a university, you may borrow a copy from there, but will have to pay generally a yearly fee for the priviledge, being a non-student of that university       Regards,  AP.
Me too i'm trying to find Alexandra's 1918 diary on the web. Any advice?

I don't know where to find it online, but I have right now beside me, a copy of "The Last Diary of Tsaritsa Alexandra", from my library.  Does your library have it?  Also, have you checked out the home page here?

I don't live either in the us either in America. I asked my local library but it has never been published in italian and they don't have a Inter Library Loan with countries abroad. That's why i have so many difficulties having infos about the romanovs: all the books written about them are in english, library don't have them and i'm cmpelled to buy them on Amazon, that becomes quite expensive because of the shipping costs!
But if you can suggest me a good edition from Amazon...


http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=last+diary+of+alexandra    I got a copy for some times, and it was very hard to get it, because in those years it was only puplished and buyable in the US. and the price was enourmous. I reread it from time to time, and it's ablout one of my favourites.

25
Alexandra Feodorovna / Re: Alexandra's Engagement and Wedding rings
« on: July 17, 2011, 07:44:31 PM »
dear robert, no crowns in greek churches ... we are a traditionally poor country ...

but they use some, I just think of a picture of later Queen Sofia and Juan Carlos during the greek service in Athens...

26
BeNeLux Royalty / Re: Queen Beatrix Part II
« on: July 08, 2011, 02:05:17 PM »
Queen Beatrix gifted some bikes for the Palucca School of Ballet at Dresden. HM and the Crownprince and CPrincess recently visted this school during their visit to Dresden.

27
just finshed, and I can say I love the book. some new facts (for me). the long waiting was absolutly worth :-)

28
Alexandra Feodorovna / Re: Miscarriage
« on: July 03, 2011, 10:09:30 PM »
I didn't want to start a new thread for this maybe simple question, but i didn't fin an existing thread that seemed suitable.
So, if mods thinks there is, i'll be very happy to see this thread united with another one!
To my question, now. Well, 2 questions.
1) I'm sure i've read a lot of times that during the coronation ceremony in May 1896 Alix was pregnant, and she lost the child a month later due to the stress. But i really can't find a source explaining me better about it. Since i didn't find anything here (or maybe i didn't searched well) i would like to ask you: what do you know about it?
I even read on an italian magazine (!!!) that the child from the miscarriage was a boy (!!!). But, first of all, the person who wrote this is not at all reliable; second, i don't think you can see the sex of a foetus a month old, or at least i guess they couldn't do it in 1896... but i'm not sure at all. Anyway, i just wanted to know more about it.

2) In 1903 (or as 1902?  :-\) Alix was pregnant. Someone told it was just her immagination, there was no child; other tell she was really pregnant but she lost the child (again). Do we know what the truth is, or can we just guess?

Thank you very much in advance.

the one during the coronation is mentioned in the four graces (extra treat) ask there the writer/forum member ilana for sources....

29
The Windsors / Re: Windsor Jewelry We Love to Hate
« on: June 19, 2011, 05:40:39 PM »
Princess Diana;s jewels were returned to the Royal collection after her death. Only her sapphire engagement ring (now owed by the Duchess of Cambridge) and her watch were retained by her sons as keepsakes of their mother.
Baloney..Total tosh!...With the exception of a couple of historic items all Dianas jewels were inherited by her sons! Not just 2 items!

I read in the papers a similar article. but I think it was meant that the ring and watch were at her sons side, the other items (returned or inherit) in a vault or a safe or similar safe place.

That's by-the-by, the point is not where these items are stored but rather what items Diana left to her sons.

Eric you know nothing, ashdean is the expert.

I said it only, because it was mentioned here. and may it was a misunderstanding. but the main point is that you guys could now continue your own "very friendly" discuss.

30
The Windsors / Re: Windsor Jewelry We Love to Hate
« on: June 19, 2011, 05:38:01 PM »
I am honored to be the one.  :)

Best Wishes.

Back to discussion. I read the pearl choker Princess Diana once wore actually belonged to the Queen ?

this was a loan choker from HM

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