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Messages - DonaAntonia

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16
The Hohenzollern / Re: House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
« on: April 24, 2009, 04:07:10 PM »
I´m becoming more and more impressed about Antonia...I always thought about her as the not very fair mother-in-law to Missy of Romania. But now I´m learning about the young infanta she was, really attached to her native country and her family. I´m glad she was marry for love. May I suppose she had a happy marriage?

Hi Yseult!
Yes, Antonia married for love. Leopold had been here in 1858, 1859 and 1860 and they were together during a long time before they became engaged. Leopold was very sweet to Antonia and that I know of, only once, when the doctors told her she could not risk having more children, did he try something very brief out of their marriage. Antonia was not young anymore but she reacted in a way that made Leopold ask for her forgiveness right away. She wanted to come back to Portugal risking all the judgements by family and press alike. After all, she told him, she was in Sigmaringen only because of Leopold. Hers ons had grown and all the other people she loved were in Portugal.
If King Luis and all their family had not died before Leopold, Antonia would had returned to Portugal in old age. But there was nobody left and she (like King Luis himself) did not get along with Queen Mother Maria Pia of Savoy's hot temper.
Missy did not like Antonia. It was from the beginning. Maybe because Antonia treated Ferdinand and his things like you would treat a child. And Missy was much more mature than Ferdinand, of course. They would had benefited from becoming friendly. It's a pity they didn't.

17
The etched center of the gold and enameled (seemingly) glass plate body bears the coat of arms of the city of Saint Petersburg.    AP

Thanks, Aleksandr! It was on display here in Lisbon, in a Hermitage Exhibition at the Ajuda Palace. Such wonders! It sure is marvelous.

18
Iberian Royal Families / Re: Maria II of Portugal and her family
« on: April 24, 2009, 03:47:47 PM »
It is true. The death of Prince Albert of Saxony is just one of the many skeletons the Miguelist subbranch of the Braganzas has in the closet. It never was sorted out, but it implied that the eldest son of the second Miguel was substituted by his younger brother Duarte, who was upgraded to «heir». He later married an American lady.


DonaAntonia, may I ask you if you have some more pictures of Maria Anna's sons Maximilian and Albert? They are absolutely rare.

Poor Albert fell off his horse while he had been on a maneuver in Wolkau, Saxony. He was severely wounded and died, before his father Georg arrived. He was 25 years old.



Is it sure he died in a  military maneuver?  Wikipedia (ok, not always the best source) says he died  of injuries sustained in a carriage crash caused by Prince Miguel of Braganza. Which is the truth?

There we go again.

As Marie-Charlotte states, Pr. Albert died from a horse fall while in military manoeuvres.

But you seem to prefer the Wikipedia article where, after spilling the poison, it even states that the causes were never cleared out and the Prince was never taken to any court .

It is not true that the Prince had to resign his military ranks or posts.
Remember that when WW1 broke, he was an officer of the austrian army , something IIRC you blamed him for...

And that episode with Pr.Albert did not make him resign in favour of D.Duarte Nuno who was born 7 years after Albert's death...
If he was to resign for that, he could have resigned in favour of Infante D.Francisco José.

But no, José! Francisco (Franz) was a homossexual (a scandal by the day's standards) and also sexually promiscuous. Read the British press of the period, as not all the titles answered generously to the family's request to have the matter «erased».
Franz was caught «in the very act of sodomy» during King Edward VII's coronation!

19
The Final Chapter / Re: Ipatiev house photos (interior & exterior)
« on: April 24, 2009, 03:43:17 PM »
It's a roadside shrine to St. Nicholas the Wonderworker. There's a very short thread about it here.

Thanks Sarushka! So it must have had an icon of St. Nicholas and a place for candles. I suppose the photo is not older than 1918, then, since the religious symbols were obviously torn down by the Bolsheviks.
We also have roadside shrines in traditionally Catholic countries. Up north, here in Portugal, there are even the «steps of the cross»: small shrines with the phases of Jesus' Passion.

20
The Hohenzollern / Re: House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
« on: April 24, 2009, 03:36:13 PM »
 I am so glad people like to read about Antonia, as so little has been discussed about her personality until now. We used to think of her only as an old lady, through Maria of Romania's memoires. But there is so much about Antonia. Much of it sad, but also very interesting and also very important in terms of a historical context.

21
The Hohenzollern / Re: House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
« on: April 24, 2009, 03:33:08 PM »
[quote author=

That's right, Yseult. The Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen princes were generally considered good choice for European thrones. Just like the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Belgium). In fact, Princess Antonia's father, the Widower King consort Fernando was also invited to sit on the Spanish throne. But having heard that Leopold was another option, he is quoted as having said. «I am old and have done my duty. Besides, I would never rob my daughter the privilege of being the Queen.»



D.Fernando was asked twice to occuppy the throne of Spain, which he declined.
He would rather live in Portugal, far from any official duties - he was briefly Regent for D.Pedro V - either in the Necessidades Palace or in Sintra at the lovely Pena Palace he had built and spent his life decorating, besides arrangeing the huge park.

He had a problem however: His second wife, the countess of Edla.
He used as his alibi for refusing the crown, as she would not be given the status of Queen should he have accepted the throne.
But it almost backfired when at a certain point the spanish negotiators admitted she could have some royal treatment.

The countess was also Infanta D.Antonia's Nemesis.
She could never stand her and refused to receive her when she came to Lisbon.
In her letters to D.Luis she complained that she could not accept knowing that "that woman" was wearing "dear Mamma's jewels".
[/quote]


Yes, Jose,
Antonia didn't like the Countess. But you must judge by the time's standards. Her father's new bride was mocked in Lisbon as a minor Opera singer whose photos in shorts and tights were for sale at the local photographic houses. And she only got a title because King Fernando's relations in Coburg answered his demands to have her called «countess of»... anything.
And it is not nice to see your mother's things worn by someone else. King Fernando should not had done that. He could easily get new jewels, hats, etc., for the new countess.

Anyway, and just like you, I still think Fernando would not had accepted the Spanish crown, even if the Countess had not existed. He really hated to have to behave as a consort while he was married to Queen Maria II. As soon his wife died he started doing what he liked most: opera, late nights, etc. Remember that legend that has been told over and over? - It happened before the countess arrived and before Antonia left to Sigmaringen:

One night, very late into the dawn, King Fernando knocked very softly at the palace doors so his valet would open as usual. It had been another night at the opera, followed by dinner and a stay with friends. When the door opened, he saw at the low light of a candle the face of his young son, the King Pedro. «What in the name of God are you doing on this side of the palace, Pedro?» And the legend has the serious and precocious Pedro answering as a King:
«I open the door for you, Daddy, so the servants will not know at what late hour His Majesty the king-father returns home!»

:-)

Antonia and Leopold were young. King Fernando had sacrificed his own youth to duty, so he must have thought it was their turn to do theirs.

22
Nicholas II / Re: portraits (paintings) of Nikolai II Aleksandrovich
« on: April 22, 2009, 08:41:10 PM »
Here is the link for the photograph of N&A's room in 1918:

http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=1379.30

23
The Hohenzollern / Re: House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
« on: April 22, 2009, 08:28:31 PM »
The Winterhalter portrait of Antonia. Larger version I have just scanned. Charming profile.



A very beautiful portrait!
I was remembering Leopold of Hohenzollern-Sigmarigen could have been spanish king ;) So, Antonia could have been a spanish queen. Amusing.



That's right, Yseult. The Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen princes were generally considered good choice for European thrones. Just like the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Belgium). In fact, Princess Antonia's father, the Widower King consort Fernando was also invited to sit on the Spanish throne. But having heard that Leopold was another option, he is quoted as having said. «I am old and have done my duty. Besides, I would never rob my daughter the privilege of being the Queen.»


24
Iberian Royal Families / Re: Maria II of Portugal and her family
« on: April 22, 2009, 08:22:04 PM »
Maria Ana on a 1859 Portuguese print.


25
The Final Chapter / Re: Ipatiev house photos (interior & exterior)
« on: April 22, 2009, 08:19:32 PM »
Hi all,
This is a beautiful detail of the outside of the Ipatiev house. I think the photo was taken in the 1920's but this little kiosk was already there when the IF lived in the house. Any idea of what it was built for or what became of it?
Thanks.





26
Nicholas II / Re: portraits (paintings) of Nikolai II Aleksandrovich
« on: April 22, 2009, 08:07:09 PM »


In regards to some more protraits of Nicky:
Below are the portraits I believe were comissioned during Nicky's reign:



I believe this portrait was at the Tobolsk house and maybe Yekaterinburg (on Nicholas and Alexandra's room ) in 1918. It is by Mikhail Rundaltsov (1913). Does anyone know if it was recovered after the IF's murder? Could it be the same picture?



This portrait of Nicholas II  is wellknown portrait painted by Valentin Serov . Portrait of  Nicholas  II  . 1900 .
In Tretiakovsky Gallery  is the original .


http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=10632.15

http://ryibak.pravoverie.ru/node/229



Thanks Tatiana Z for the great link to the picture.
The one on Tobolsk/Yekaterinburg was a copy, and it has Alexei's portrait on the bottom corner.
It too exists today but it was for sure with the IF in 1918. Could it had been taken from them after the photo was taken?


27
Iberian Royal Families / Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« on: April 22, 2009, 04:17:40 PM »
This was on Ebay a while ago and I think it is quite intersting: the future King Carlos of Portugal still a Prince, with some relatives, including the Hessian sisters (Ella by his side).



28
Iberian Royal Families / Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« on: April 22, 2009, 04:12:47 PM »
Yes, José, the exhibition is indeed moving. Some of the items there, you really can see that were kept because they reminded the Queen of something special or of a special occasion. Her little babies' clothing is also very touching. And for the first time, I read (on her passport) her height: 1, 82 m.

29
The Windsors / Re: Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, Part II
« on: April 22, 2009, 04:04:59 PM »
Camilla Duchess of Cornwall as a debutante. Very pretty. I don't know if this photo had been posted before, so here goes.


30
The Hohenzollern / Re: House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen
« on: April 22, 2009, 03:27:22 PM »

The Hohenzollern-Sigmaringens never forgot Antonia and Leopold's legacy: they still have a factory here in Portugal and the coats of arms of both Portugal and H-S still show side by side at the Hohenzollern castle.

I've never been there, but I hope to go one day...



I visited it a couple of years ago, as well as Hechingen.

Both are wonderful.

In Sigmaringen one of the rooms is the "Portuguese Gallery"

http://www.hohenzollern.com/schloss-sigmaringen/en/sub2/downloads.php

José: I really am jealous! You are so lucky to have gone to Sigmaringen! I hope to be able to go one day. I think to be poor is also a
blessing: we tend to value more what we have and what we hope for. I understand Antonia decorated the «Portuguese Gallery» with the
things she inherited from her father. Of all the Queen Maria II and King consort Fernando's children she was the one who most liked
antiques and Portuguese traditional pieces. «Tralha», as we call it here in Portugal. Who doesn't love «tralha» is not a good Portuguese
;-)

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