Author Topic: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov  (Read 128733 times)

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Offline Sarushka

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #60 on: October 25, 2008, 09:47:29 PM »
You're welcome, Ferah.

To my knowledge, the book is only available through Gilbert's Royal Books in Canada and Van Hoogstraten in the Netherlands. (I suspect Van Hoogstraten is actually ordering through GRB.) GRB also sells their stock on eBay, but the price and shipping are identical to what he offers on his own site.
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Offline Teddy

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #61 on: October 26, 2008, 02:24:03 AM »
Dear Ferah,

You can buy the book trough Van Hoogstraten in the Hague. They will be glad to help you.

Gerjo

PS By the way, the book is great. But I'm curious about the authors reason behind it, to publish the diary in the first place! What were her motives.


Lalee

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #62 on: October 26, 2008, 03:09:16 AM »
Thank you very much, Sarushka and Teddy, for your help!

Teddy, here is a quote from Raegan at the beginning of the thread, where she mentioned that she wanted to give people a glimpse into the Imperial Family's private, everyday life.

Marina Petrov is a professional translator I hired when I return to the United States after my first trip to Russia in 2005. During my first trip to GARF, I made copies of some of the family’s diaries and letters (as well as other documents) and came to the decision to publish Grand Duchess Olga’s 1913 diary in order to give people a glimpse into the private life of the family. After the translation of the diary was completed, I did the editing, wrote the introduction and included an explanation of the Russian calendar in 1913, as well as a list of people Olga wrote about in her diary and their relation to her.

I want to thank everyone who has sent me private messages of congratulations. I do apologize to the people I have not yet gotten back to. Life has been kind of hectic lately, so I am taking a much needed vacation soon. Also, thanks to the people who knew about this project of mine long before it was ever mentioned here on the forum. Your words of encouragement and interest in the book were so kind. Yes, that includes you Teddy! Thank you!


Offline Sarai

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #63 on: October 26, 2008, 07:45:28 AM »
One reason is that Raegan wanted to clear up some misconceptions about the girls' lives, particularly the idea that they were very sheltered, never had much of a social life, and were closed up in their palaces all the time. As we can read from Olga's diary, she had a very active social life, visits from family, playing games with cousins, attending society events, etc. She was either out or had visitors every day.


PS By the way, the book is great. But I'm curious about the authors reason behind it, to publish the diary in the first place! What were her motives.


Offline Sarai

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #64 on: October 26, 2008, 07:49:32 AM »
Yes, there is an entry on March 13th where she says that their hair was washed with gasoline and was later dry and sticking out everywhere LOL. I too was surprised at that! I agree the strong point of the book is definitely the text and not the pictures, but it was always meant that way anyway. I do hope more diaries are published in the future.


I love the book. I'm glad that nothing was left out from the Grand Duchess's diary. I'm just disappointed to the fact that I didn't find any new rare pics. But I think because of the price of the book that it wasn't possible to publish new pics. Why is GARF so jealously protective of the last imperial family's albums and pics? Also, there was an entry where Olga's hair was washed with gasoline!!!! My mom said that was done in the old times to get rid of lice. :o

Offline markjhnstn

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #65 on: October 26, 2008, 07:56:09 AM »
Yes, I hope more diaries become available. They really give us a window into their lives. The Olga of 1913 seems a more exuberant and bubbly persona than i would ever have thought before I read the diary.

Offline Sarushka

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #66 on: October 26, 2008, 08:06:28 AM »
As we can read from Olga's diary, she had a very active social life, visits from family, playing games with cousins, attending society events, etc. She was either out or had visitors every day.

That's true, but I'd love to know even more about these visitors and acquaintances. How many of them were Olga's age? Sablin, for example, was 33. I believe Voronov was at least 10 years older than Olga. There are very few young women mentioned at all outside of her own cousins. Many of the people she lists as visitors to the palace and guests at meals were her father's aides-de-camp. Did she form any real relationships with the people she had tea and played games with at Olga Alexandrovna's, or were they basically occasional playmates?

So yes, Olga definitely had a lot more social activity than we're used to believing, but I'm still cautious about saying she had a well-rounded social life. The apparent lack of friendships with people her own age is still bothersome to me.
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
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Offline Teddy

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #67 on: October 26, 2008, 08:55:54 AM »
I'm going to write to Gilbert Royal Books, to thank for the book and let him know that from my point of view, I think that many people would also buy all the other diaries if someone had to change to translate and publish them.

Maybe if more members of this board would write Gilbert, telling him the same, Raegan or someone else will go to publish the other diaries. Not only from Olga, but also of her siblings, father and mother, in the same form, ms Baker did.

So, who thinks that the diaries must be published: please write!

Offline Sarushka

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #68 on: October 26, 2008, 09:31:54 AM »
I'm going to write to Gilbert Royal Books, to thank for the book and let him know that from my point of view, I think that many people would also buy all the other diaries if someone had to change to translate and publish them.

Maybe if more members of this board would write Gilbert, telling him the same, Raegan or someone else will go to publish the other diaries. Not only from Olga, but also of her siblings, father and mother, in the same form, ms Baker did.

So, who thinks that the diaries must be published: please write!

I think that's a great idea. After reading this edition, I know I'd LOVE to see the girls' later diaries in print, to learn how the war affected them.

If we can demonstrate there's a market for these books -- both by buying the 1913 edition and requesting further editions -- there's a fair chance Gilbert will consider printing more.
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world." ~Greg King

Offline rgt9w

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #69 on: October 26, 2008, 11:01:43 AM »
Is the regimental church Olga refers to attending in the diary the Fyodorovsky Cathedral?

Offline tian79

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #70 on: October 27, 2008, 02:51:04 AM »
Does anyone know what Olga meant by "turnip applications"? I have no clue. LOL.
Could it be some kind of cure for her leg? Didn't she mention them after her fall? 

Offline Rodney_G.

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #71 on: October 28, 2008, 06:29:23 PM »
 Raegan Baker, I hope you're reading this thread. For every poster longing for the publication of more of the Grand Duchesses' diaries there are countless others who'd love to read/ and/or buy them. We can't pretend we're a vast mainstream audience whose purchases will make you rich but I hope we're numerous enough to make the translation and publication of more diaries worthwhile.(And surely our immense gratitude counts for something ;)
As for me, maybe Maria's 1912 diary? Any would actually be great.
Rodney G.

Offline carkuczyn

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #72 on: October 28, 2008, 06:47:56 PM »
I agree with rodney, raegan.  I ordered olga's diary a few days ago and I will buy all of the others as they come into print also.  Your hard work is greatly appreciated.

Lalee

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #73 on: October 29, 2008, 02:14:36 AM »
Like I said earlier, it would be fantastic to read other diaries. I believe that Raegan's choice of publishing Olga's 1913 diary was great, because it was the year before the lives of the Imperial Family changed greatly, the 300th anniversary of Romanov rule, and also Olga, who was the eldest and the most introspective. I am particularly interested in reading the 1914-onward diaries of Olga, and also of Tatiana (I admire her very much), to see particularly how much their lives changed and, hopefully, find out the girls' opinions. I've read some excerpts of their diaries throughout a lot of threads, and I'm interested to read more.

Offline Elisabeth

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Re: 1913 Diary of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna, transl. by Marina Petrov
« Reply #74 on: October 29, 2008, 10:52:55 AM »
As we can read from Olga's diary, she had a very active social life, visits from family, playing games with cousins, attending society events, etc. She was either out or had visitors every day.

That's true, but I'd love to know even more about these visitors and acquaintances. How many of them were Olga's age? Sablin, for example, was 33. I believe Voronov was at least 10 years older than Olga. There are very few young women mentioned at all outside of her own cousins. Many of the people she lists as visitors to the palace and guests at meals were her father's aides-de-camp. Did she form any real relationships with the people she had tea and played games with at Olga Alexandrovna's, or were they basically occasional playmates?

So yes, Olga definitely had a lot more social activity than we're used to believing, but I'm still cautious about saying she had a well-rounded social life. The apparent lack of friendships with people her own age is still bothersome to me.

I have to admit that for me, when I was reading Olga's 1913 diary, the whole issue of her and her sisters' so-called social isolation, which has been such a ubiquitous theme in recent historical works about the imperial family, seemed like a complete mischaracterization of their lives, in no small part because modern commentators read early 20th-century lives as if they should be late-20th century, early 21st-century lives. After all, by the standards of her day, the Grand Duchess Olga of the early 1910s had plenty of company, and an infinitely happier and more active social life than the overwhelming majority of her contemporaries. Let us recall that the idea of the "teenager" only really emerged in American culture of the 1950s. Prior to this, once you passed the age of fifteen or sixteen (depending on your social status, it was often quite younger), whether male or female, you were an adult for all intents and purposes, and expected to make your own way, or at the very least contribute to your family's economic welfare, either by work or by marriage or both. Most Russian and for that matter European "teenagers" of Olga's time did not lead such carefree lives as she did. And this general rule, that one owed to family and society what family and society dictated, was not only applied to the common masses, it affected the nobility as well.

So let's face it, Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna led an extremely pampered, sheltered, and yes, carefree life, up until the outbreak of the first world war. She was not under pressure to make an advantageous marriage. She had polite, non-threatening partners galore for her dances and silly card games (whether these men were thirty years old or her own age scarcely matters in terms of the fun quotient, in fact it seems to me the older the wiser and more gentlemanly), she went to the theater, opera, and ballet on a regular basis, she went on a special tour of much of the Russian empire during the tercentary of the Romanov dynasty, she attended endless balls, parties, teas, etc., etc., etc. She was hardly deprived! The whole notion that the daughters of Nicholas II and Alexandra were "isolated" and cut off from an "active social life" should be thoroughly discredited by the publication of this diary by Raegan Baker.

You might well ask, what struck me most about Olga's diary for 1913? Her exclamation, very early on, "I'm so happy!" That summed up the entire diary for me. Furthermore, this expression of happiness should, I think, be a great comfort to those of us who still retain fond feelings for Olga as an individual eventually caught up in and destroyed by historical events beyond her control. At least we can take consolation in the fact that prior to World War I, Olga Nikolaevna was a very happy and seemingly well-adjusted young woman, someone who took great pleasure in her life and in the ordinary pleasures of those around her.
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