Author Topic: Alexei and Hemophilia  (Read 190885 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Forum Admin

  • Administrator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 4665
  • www.alexanderpalace.org
    • View Profile
    • Alexander Palace Time Machine
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #225 on: April 19, 2006, 02:39:51 PM »
Quote
Back when that article was written, in most cases, any blood disease was generalized as haemophilia. This included to what happened at Spala. One must remember that medical pracitices and the diagnosis of diseases that were not fully understood back then have now been looked at "under a microscope".

To be honest, I never read the New York Times. For news stories, I might believe it. However, for articles that are 96 years old, I wouldn't take with a grain of salt.


In school (post-secondary), we are taught that if we are looking for any reference for a paper, we are to look for an article that has been peer-reviewed. Also, it is also highly recommended that we look for the most recent publication date. In this regard, that article is not valid in my eyes.

With new pieces of information, we are able to correct what has been handed down in history. This includes everything from Egypt to Medicine. For example, Hysteria was thought to only occur in women, and were cured by hystrectomy. We know now that this was not the case.

Then again, at that time, the men were doctors, and any sickness was blamed on the women. How is this different?

Society has come a long way, but for some reason, people like to hold on to things that they think was true then and still do. They are not willing to change. Yet, change will occur, no matter what.


I never did believe that he had haemophilia, but I do know that it was a blood diesease of some sort. I'm not like other people. I think for myself, not by what others think. By this, I'm trying to set examples, not only to my peers, but also to my elders, who are currently set in stone in their thinking.


Well, first of all, I wish you would subscribe to your own words. PLEASE present the peer-review articles to support your broad-brush sweeping, and incorrect assertions:
1.Back when that article was written, in most cases, any blood disease was generalized as haemophilia
2.One must remember that medical pracitices and the diagnosis of diseases that were not fully understood back then have now been looked at "under a microscope".

and what does : For example, Hysteria was thought to only occur in women, and were cured by hystrectomy. We know now that this was not the case. have to do AT ALL with the discussion of haemophilia.

The first modern description of haemophilia is attributed to Dr. John Conrad Otto, a physician in Philadelphia, who in 1803 published a treatise entitled "An account of an haemorrhagic disposition existing in certain families." He clearly appreciated the three cardinal features of haemophilia: an inherited tendency of males to bleed. Otto traced back the pedigree of the family he studies, to a woman who had settled near Plymouth, New Hampshire, in about 1720. However, the first use of the word "haemophilia" appears for the first time in an account of the condition written by Hopff ("Uber die haemophilie oder die erbliche Anlage zu todlichen Blutungen"), a pupil of Schonlein at the University of Zurich, in 1828. A full accurate description of the disease, including the unique mode of inheritance was made in 1820 by Nasse. The involvement of the joints as a characteristic symtom of the diease was described by Konig in 1890.  Generational studies following the inheritance of haemophilia in families was documented in peer review literature in 1813 (Hay), 1885 (Osler) and 1908 (Pratt).  In 1909, Bulloch meticulously traced haemophilia across all of the Royal Houses of Europe, and worked with Fildes in that year to define and stabilise the concept of Haemophilia according to symptoms, inheritance and sex incidence. In 1910 the Scot Addis in Edinburgh further associated the lengthy clotting time with the disease, and even found that the factor that would allow haemophilic blood to clot normally.  (The history of haemophilia.
Ingram GIC. Journal of Clinical Pathology 29: 469-479 (1976)
 Queen Victoria had no ancestors with the condition but soon after the birth of her eighth child, Leopold, in 1853 it became evident that he had haemophilia. Queen Victoria was thus an example of how the condition can arise as a spontaneous mutation. Leopold's medical condition was reported in the British Medical Journal in 1868, and it is clear that he was troubled by bleeds occurring at least once a month. He died at the age of 31 in 1884 from intracerebral haemorrhage after a fall. Leopold had married two years before his death. His daughter, Alice, was an obligate carrier and also went on to have a haemophilic son. Rupert, Viscount Trematon, was born in 1907 and died at the age of 21, also from an intracerebal haemorrhage. It also subsequently transpired that two of Queen Victoria's own daughters, Alice and Beatrice, were carriers of haemophilia. The condition was transmitted through them to several Royal families in Europe, including Spain and Russia.( Queen Victoria's gene: haemophilia and the Royal family.
Potts DM & Potts WTW. Publ. Alan Sutton Publishing 1995.ISBN 075090868
)

The only "genuine" change according to the literature in diagnosis of heamophilia is the distinction between Type A and Type B of the disease, and advances in understanding the root cause of the disease, however the literature is clear that the disease ITSELF was well understood by 1912. (Ingram, supra.  

I look forward to your own peer review evidence citations.

Offline Forum Admin

  • Administrator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 4665
  • www.alexanderpalace.org
    • View Profile
    • Alexander Palace Time Machine
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #226 on: April 19, 2006, 03:22:06 PM »
Quote
In school (post-secondary), we are taught that if we are looking for any reference for a paper, we are to look for an article that has been peer-reviewed. Also, it is also highly recommended that we look for the most recent publication date. In this regard, that article is not valid in my eyes.

"Haemophilia was an important contributing factor in the fall of the Romanov dynasty, thereby affecting the history of the Russian Empire as well as the history of the world at large. The occurrence of haemophilia in the reigning houses of England, Germany and Spain also influenced the course of events in these countries".
S Afr Med J. 1981 Jul 25;60(4):143-4.

THE HISTORY OF HAEMOPHILIA IN THE ROYAL FAMILIES OF EUROPE  British Journal of Haematology
Volume 105 Page 25  - April 1999
doi:10.1111/j.1365-2141.1999.01327.x
Volume 105 Issue 1


"Haemophilia is a bleeding disorder which has always attracted wide interest both among physicians and the laity--uncontrollable haemorrhage, blood that fails to coagulate and heredity with only males affected. The disease is probably best known to the public through its appearance in European royal families and in the Russian Imperial family." Nilsson, I.M.,  Sydsven Medicinhist Sallsk Arsskr. 1994;31:33-52.

"The authors trace the spread of the haemophilia gene from Victoria to the other royal families and speculate about the role that this inherited disease may have played in events leading up to the first world war and the Russian and Spanish revolutions.
Haemophilia was responsible for the early deaths of several princes, and also affected the heirs to the Russian and Spanish royal thrones." "is well worth reading" BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, BMJ 1995;311:1106-1107 (21 October)   review of "Queen Victoria's Gene: Haemophilia and the Royal Family"
Helen M Kingston , D M Potts, W T W Potts Alan Sutton, pp 160 ISBN 0 7509 0868 8


 Pharmaceuticals Policy and Law Volume 7 / 2005,2006 Pages: 91 - 92

"Queen Victoria inadvertently initiated the malady of hemophilia in the royal houses of Britain, Russia, Prussia, and Spain..." Famous people and genetic disorders: From monarchs to geniuses - A portrait of their genetic illnesses
Nicola C. Ho 1 *, Susan S. Park 2, Kevin D. Maragh 2, Emily M. Gutter 3
1Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland
2Department of Biological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
3Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio
published in: American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A
Volume 118A, Issue 2 , Pages 187 - 196, 2003.


Hemophilia as it affected members of the English, Prussian, Spanish and Russian Royal houses:
Hemophilia treatment in historical perspective: a review of medical and social developments
F. R. Rosendaal1, 2, C. Smit1, 2 and E. Briët1, 2
(1)       Department of Hematology, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University Hospital Leiden, The Netherlands
(2)       Netherlands Hemophilia Society, Building 1, Co-P-46, P.O. Box 9600, NL-2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands
Annals of Hematology
Publisher: Springer Berlin / Heidelberg
ISSN: 0939-5555 (Paper) 1432-0584 (Online)
DOI: 10.1007/BF01714977
Issue:  Volume 62, Number 1
Date:  February 1991
Pages: 5 - 15

Shall I continue??

Offline Forum Admin

  • Administrator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 4665
  • www.alexanderpalace.org
    • View Profile
    • Alexander Palace Time Machine
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #227 on: April 19, 2006, 08:51:43 PM »
Hemophilia is well known for its effect on the royal houses of Europe. Queen Victoria, a clinically normal
carrier, had one son, Leopold, who had hemophilia and two daughters, Alice and Beatrice, who were carriers and who, in turn, transmitted the disease to the Russian, Prussian, and Spanish royal families. Since the two X-linked hemophilias are clinically indistinguishable and none of the descendants of Queen Victoria who were known to be affected are alive (the last one, Waldemar, died in 1945), we may never know which type of hemophilia they had.
The Hemophilias—From Royal Genes TO Gene Therapy. Pier M Mannucci, Edward GD
Tuddenham New England Journal of Medicine 344:2323, 6/2001.


********

Femoral neuropathy due to retroperitoneal bleeding. A red herring in medicine complicates anticoagulant therapy and influences the Russian Communist Revolution (Crown Prince Alexis, Rasputin).


Willbanks OL, Willbanks SE.

Femoral neuropathy occurs when occult retroperitoneal bleeding impinges on the appropriate nerve roots. The syndrome involves the acute onset of groin and thigh pain with characteristic flexion and external rotation of the hip. It may mimic other conditions such as acute arterial occlusion. Thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the femoral nerve explains the clinical features and leads the clinician to suspect the occurrence of this syndrome. Three cases have been reviewed that exhibited this condition as a result of retroperitoneal bleeding, a complication of systemic heparin therapy. The hemophilia that afflicted Alexis, the Crown Prince of Russia and son of Tsar Nicholas and Tsarina Alexandra, resulted in this clinical syndrome.
American Journal of Surgery 1983 Feb;145(2):193-8.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by admin »

Offline RealAnastasia

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1890
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #228 on: April 21, 2006, 12:52:17 AM »
Some pople here divides things in white or black. We are NOT analizing Heino Tammet's claim here, but if Alexei had hemophilia or not.  And this last point is quite clear to me: Alexei suffered from hemophilia. That's for sure. All the symptoms shows it clearly. If you can go to a library to read any hematology book, you'll find that the Tsarevitch had the same disease than other of his male relatives in Queen's Victoria's side.

The symptoms of his disease are NOT those of the thrombocytopenia or other blood disease, but those of hemophilia. The "hemarthorsis" is a trouble caused by hemophilia, and it's a distinctive symptom of it. Thrombocytopenia didn't have hemarthrosis as a characteristic.

We can discuss deeply in other threads ("Survivors" or "Claimants", but not this one) if Alexei could have survived suffering fom hemophilia (this is another issue) after the shots in the Ipatiev house. But it's clear that he had hemophilia.The clinic history of his mother's family and his own, show this more than clearly.

RealAnastaia.

Offline imperial angel

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 4608
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #229 on: April 21, 2006, 08:53:55 AM »
There is alot of research to back up the fact that what Alexei had was hemphophilia, and not another bleeding disease. You are obviously ignoring the history of his family, and the evidence, and research, from later on, when people were objective to say that he did not have hemophilia. There is much more evidence than a contemporary newspaper article, which is actually from a reputuable newspaper, and to say that this is the only evidence is false. There is alot more recent, and informed evidence out there about his hemophilia, and actually that is when almost all of any writing about Alexei having hemophilia is from. But people can believe what they wish-nothing is certain, but there is much to prove Alexei had hemophilia.

Offline Belochka

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 4447
  • City of Peter stand in all your splendor - Pushkin
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #230 on: April 22, 2006, 01:39:27 AM »
"Numerous others have helped with my understanding of this story... whether they realize it or not.  Russia's Dr. Pavel Ivanov appeared to mistake me for a fellow scientist the first time that we spoke on the telephone.  He hasn't answered my letters now since September 1995.  The late Dr. William Maples at the University of Florida stopped talking the year before that.  England's Dr. Peter Gill sent photocopies of his 1994 NATURE GENETICS article without ever saying a word."

http://www.npsnet.com/tsarevich_alexei/page37.html  


Taken from Mr Kendrick's website @ p 37 regarding the Vancouver imposter.

Nothing further needs to be said.




Faces of Russia is now on Facebook!


http://www.searchfoundationinc.org/

Offline RealAnastasia

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1890
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #231 on: April 22, 2006, 11:48:16 PM »
Quote
"Numerous others have helped with my understanding of this story... whether they realize it or not.  Russia's Dr. Pavel Ivanov appeared to mistake me for a fellow scientist the first time that we spoke on the telephone.  He hasn't answered my letters now since September 1995.  The late Dr. William Maples at the University of Florida stopped talking the year before that.  England's Dr. Peter Gill sent photocopies of his 1994 NATURE GENETICS article without ever saying a word."

http://www.npsnet.com/tsarevich_alexei/page37.html  


Taken from Mr Kendrick's website @ p 37 regarding the Vancouver imposter.

Nothing further needs to be said.




We are not discussing Dr. Kendrick skills here, even if I don't believe any of his "scientific" infos.  We are discussing if Alexei had haemophilia (or hemophilia, I saw the word written in two different forms) or not. His symptoms MATCHS exactly the ones of haemophilia...So, the tsarevich had this blood disease and not any other. The genetic story of her mother's family is there to witness what I'm saying.

We are not discusing if an haemophiliac boy could have survived from a shot in a small cellar; we are not discussing if Heino Tammet was Alexei. We are discussing if Alexei had haemophilia or not. And for me is a concrete evidence that he suffered from haemophilia. Dr. Kendrick must know if he is a scientific, as he claims he is, that Alexei symptoms could be not other than this blood disease.

This man does as much other persons I knew uses to do: as he believes that Mr. Tammet IS Alexei and he must demonstrate to his "public" that a survival was possible, he must show that Tammet had not haemophilia...Sure. Nevertheless, the disease he choosed in order to show that he suffered from another blood disorder (thomocythopenia) didn't match Alexei symptoms.

Those kind of attitudes doesn't help a bit to discover the truth behind the facts.

Alexei could have survived the shots or not...but he had haemophilia. And this is for sure.

RealAnastasia.

Offline Belochka

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 4447
  • City of Peter stand in all your splendor - Pushkin
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #232 on: April 23, 2006, 12:31:45 AM »
Quote

We are discussing if Alexei had haemophilia (or hemophilia, I saw the word written in two different forms) or not.

.... We are not discusing if an haemophiliac boy could have survived from a shot in a small cellar; we are not discussing if Heino Tammet was Alexei.

... Dr. Kendrick must know if he is a scientific,

RealAnastasia.

Quote
Only the claims of one non-scientist supporting the Tamnet claim even refute it, yet elsewhere in the Forum you can read the scientific proof also dispel even these claims.  

Of course if you have some specific scientific evidence, please do share it.


The center of this entire discussion DOES revolve around the myth that the Tsesarevich suffered from some other condition.

The Vancouver imposter died as a mature adult and was never medically assessed to have suffered from hemophilia.

The real questions are why must Mr Kendrick continues to maintain this tired myth? If this journalist resided not in Vancouver but in Winnepeg, would an "Alexei" have emerged there instead?
 ;D
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Belochka »


Faces of Russia is now on Facebook!


http://www.searchfoundationinc.org/

Offline Belochka

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 4447
  • City of Peter stand in all your splendor - Pushkin
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #233 on: April 23, 2006, 12:36:39 AM »
Quote
Back when that article was written, in most cases, any blood disease was generalized as haemophilia.  

Mr K,

Does this mean that leukemia was also "generalized as hemophilia"?

Could you be so kind and cite a reputable reference from a peer reviewed Hematology J. to accord with your statement that "any blood disease was generalized as haemophilia".

I understand that leukemia was Tammet's cause of death.
 :o
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Belochka »


Faces of Russia is now on Facebook!


http://www.searchfoundationinc.org/

Offline Helen_Azar

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 7472
  • Coming up Fall 2015: Tatiana's diaries and letters
    • View Profile
    • War-time diaries of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna Romanov
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #234 on: April 23, 2006, 08:41:10 AM »
Quote
Quote
"Dr. Kendrick must know if he is a scientific..

RealAnastasia, I am just curious, how come anyone who supports any claimant immediately gets an honorary doctorate from you? I noticed that you do the same thing with Dick Schweitzer, referring to him "Dr Schweitzer". Neither one of these men are doctors...  
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by helenazar »

Offline J_Kendrick

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 230
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #235 on: April 23, 2006, 04:28:44 PM »
Quote
Quote
Back when that article was written, in most cases, any blood disease was generalized as haemophilia.  

Mr K,

Does this mean that leukemia was also "generalized as hemophilia"?

Could you be so kind and cite a reputable reference from a peer reviewed Hematology J. to accord with your statement that "any blood disease was generalized as haemophilia".

I understand that leukemia was Tammet's cause of death.
 :o


Dear Belochka

I am not Kaleema!  I never use an alias.  Kaleema is an entirely different person who is entitled to express her own opinions.  If you have a comment to make in reply to Kaleema's posts, then please address them to Kaleema.

Please stay on topic... the question of Alexei's medical diathesis.

And if you must quote something of mine that is related to the topic of this thread, then I would suggest that you start here:

"If we are to accept the popular diagnosis of history and call it a clotting factor deficiency, then the boy's now famous sudden recoveries will remain a complete mystery.  The so-called "Mad Monk" Rasputin, as a direct result of the revolutionary propaganda of the time, is then overblown into a larger-than-life legend.  If, however, we are to change the diagnosis and call it a platelet disorder, then the air is let out of the legend, and Rasputin is revealed to have been nothing more than a very ordinary middle-aged Siberian hippie who did not possess any healing powers at all."

From the peer-reviewed American Journal of Hematology, Vol. 77, No. 1, pages 92-102, September 2004.

JK

P.S.  To answer your earlier question:  
Even if I had lived in Winnipeg, Tammet-Romanov would still be here in Vancouver.  Some other poor soul would be then reporting his story and having to endure your jibes.

Offline RealAnastasia

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1890
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #236 on: April 23, 2006, 07:53:08 PM »
Quote
Quote
Quote
"Dr. Kendrick must know if he is a scientific..

RealAnastasia, I am just curious, how come anyone who supports any claimant immediately gets an honorary doctorate from you? I noticed that you do the same thing with Dick Schweitzer, referring to him "Dr Schweitzer". Neither one of these men are doctors...  


Sorry, Mr. Kendrick. The trouble comes for I'm from Argentina. In my country , people who gets a lawyer certificate is called "Doctor",as well as some other high universitary degrees. We have "Doctors in Medicine", "Doctors in Lawyer's affaires" and so on. Since Mr. Schweitzer is a lawyer, I supposed it was correct to call him "Doctor". My English is pretty bad, and one of the most difficult thing to learn are titles and diplomes. For example: in my country there is not the title of "Senior". We have Doctors and Licenciates (Licenciados).

I did not give any "honoris causa" doctorate to Mr. Schweitzer, I only believed that I can call him as we call lawyers in my country. Sorry again.

And...now, it is me who am curious. Which other claimant supporter I entitled as "Doctor"?  Peter Kurth? I don't think I ever called him "doctor". I always referred to him as "Peter". Penny Wilson? She supposes that someone could have survived the shots in the cellar, but she is not an Anna Anderson supporter. She doesn't believe she was Anastasia and doesn't support any particular claimant. I call her "Penny" any way...Greg King? He has the same ideas than Penny, and I call him Greg. Joseph Douaigues, the Spanish man who claims to be María Nicholaievna's grandson? I left few post at the "María Martí Thread" and wrote to him three times asking about his case, calling him "Mr. Douaigues" (Señor Douaigues, since I wrote to him in Spanish). I never had any contact with "Granny Alina" descendants, no with other pretenders supporters.

My reasons to name Mr. Schweitzer politely (I didn't know I was giving a wrong title to him) is that he is an elderly man and I can't treat he same way an elderly person than a young one. I learned this from my family since I was little and won't change this now.

And if I called you Doctor is for the same reason I entitled Mr. Schweitzer the same way. I don't know you, you never emailed me privately. So, as a sign of respect, I must call you with your title. I supposed you were Doctor. So, forgive me.

RealAnastasia.


Offline Belochka

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 4447
  • City of Peter stand in all your splendor - Pushkin
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #237 on: April 24, 2006, 12:33:23 AM »
Quote
And if you must quote something of mine that is related to the topic of this thread, then I would suggest that you start here:

"If we are to accept the popular diagnosis of history and call it a clotting factor deficiency, then the boy's now famous sudden recoveries will remain a complete mystery.  The so-called "Mad Monk" Rasputin, as a direct result of the revolutionary propaganda of the time, is then overblown into a larger-than-life legend.  If, however, we are to change the diagnosis and call it a platelet disorder, then the air is let out of the legend, and Rasputin is revealed to have been nothing more than a very ordinary middle-aged Siberian hippie who did not possess any healing powers at all."

From the peer-reviewed American Journal of Hematology, Vol. 77, No. 1, pages 92-102, September 2004.

JK

Thank you for your clarifications Mr Kendrick.
 
"Historic Perspectives" presented in scientific journals are customarily extended to persons outside the medical community as "guests" by invitation whose articles are not based on solid laboratory research, but only offer a generalized discourse that is not subject to peer review.
 
Such a category of publication falls outside of the parameters to which scientists are normally subjected. Peer review is a standard procedure that normally ensures that new research claims can be questioned with regard to the methodology used, ensuring the reproducibility of similar results by other professional colleagues in the field. Such a practice assists in the advancement of credible medical scientific inquiry. Historic Perspectives are just that, by definition, they do not advance scientific inquiry.
 
The majority of hard working laboratory scientists must adsorb masses of documents each week. Due to time constraints they essentially only focus upon their field of interest. From experience any articles that fall outside one's specific interest are simply ignored; if only because of the magnitude of publications available on the library shelf each week.
 

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Belochka »


Faces of Russia is now on Facebook!


http://www.searchfoundationinc.org/

Offline J_Kendrick

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 230
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #238 on: April 24, 2006, 12:03:43 PM »
Quote
Thank you for your clarifications Mr Kendrick.
 
"Historic Perspectives" presented in scientific journals are customarily extended to persons outside the medical community as "guests" by invitation whose articles are not based on solid laboratory research, but only offer a generalized discourse that is not subject to peer review.
 


Nice try, Belochka, but rest assured that this article was fully subject to peer- review, just as any other paper that is submitted to the journal must be.  The Journal's editor who had put this same paper to review is a professor of Hematology/Oncology at Emory University in Atlanta.

The article was originally destined to be published in the category of "Brief Reports'', but was given its own category for the very simple reason that the journal had never done a Historical case study before and the article had exceeded the journal's required word length for all the other categories by almost double.

The review panel did find the medical theories and conclusions contained in the paper to be medically sound.  If the panel's decision had been any different, then the paper would not have been accepted for publication.

It *has* been found to be medically sound by peer-review.  It *has* been published in a recognised hematology journal.
 
Find any excuse you like to try and explain it away, but now that this new alternative hypothesis for Alexei's blood disease is a matter of public record in the National Library of Medicine.... you're still stuck with it. :-)

JK

Offline Ra-Ra-Rasputin

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 814
  • Another Anastasia claimant; the ears match exactly
    • View Profile
Re: Alexei and Hemophilia
« Reply #239 on: April 24, 2006, 12:18:31 PM »
Mr Kendrick,

Do you therefore believe that none of the members of the Royal family who were purported to have had haemophilia actually had haemophilia, then?  Is this rare blood disease you speak of an inherited condition? Because if not, how do you explain the occurence of bleeding diseases consistently throughout the royal family? They can't all have had random bleeding diseases with no inherited connection, surely?

Now I'm no scientist but you've got to admit, the chances of a boy born to a mother with known haemophilia in her family to have a rare blood disease very similar to haemophilia but a separate disease would have to be about a million to one, right?

Rachel
xx
'History teaches that history teaches us nothing' ~ Hegel