Author Topic: Alexandra's Personal World  (Read 222959 times)

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Offline Sarushka

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #525 on: March 31, 2009, 05:12:03 PM »
Other Faberge items from Alexandra's rooms at the AP:



(I have a few other images of Faberge pieces from the AP, but it's not known whose rooms they were from.)
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Offline David_Newell

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #526 on: April 01, 2009, 05:46:13 AM »
Just lovely, I know AF had some beautiful Galle vases as well but I have only evidence of these being at the Winter Palace. I know some were gifts from the French around 1896 and this would make sense as they lived at the WP a lot before 1905. Shame we do not have more on the inventories of the WP. I know several were done.

Offline gogm

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #527 on: April 01, 2009, 10:34:15 AM »
0 to 40 degrees is a small range for a thermometer!




It is either a Celcius or Réaumur thermometer - by Alixz 04/28/2009
« Last Edit: April 28, 2009, 08:49:41 AM by Alixz »

Offline Ally Kumari

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #528 on: April 01, 2009, 11:08:48 AM »

(I have a few other images of Faberge pieces from the AP, but it's not known whose rooms they were from.)

Could you post them too please?

Offline Sarushka

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #529 on: April 01, 2009, 11:13:42 AM »
0 to 40 degrees is a small range for a thermometer!

I believe Alexandra used the Reaumur scale, by which water freezes at 0 and boils at 80 degrees.
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world." ~Greg King

Offline Sarushka

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #530 on: April 01, 2009, 11:14:48 AM »

(I have a few other images of Faberge pieces from the AP, but it's not known whose rooms they were from.)

Could you post them too please?

THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world." ~Greg King

Offline Ally Kumari

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #531 on: April 01, 2009, 11:16:07 AM »
Thank you Sarushka! You´re a golden mine.

Offline Thomas_Hesse

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #532 on: April 01, 2009, 04:40:00 PM »
The photo was taken in 1901 - presumably at Kiel... it is signed "Sunny" and stood on the Tsar's desk at Tsarkoe Selo.
A similar one of Grand Duchess Elisaveta from the same sitting is to be found on Grand Duke Ernst Ludwig of Hesse's desk at Wolfsgarten
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Offline Thomas_Hesse

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #533 on: April 02, 2009, 10:49:54 AM »

I still think - to be honest - that the Empress did not have a very exclusive and up-to-date style like for example her mother-in-law or sister Grand Duchess Ella whose dresses were most perfectlly designed. I really like the outfits she would wear in privacy: simple but rather elegant gowns which suited here immensely. But on official occasions she often looked rather "home-made" imo.
As for her rooms: it is the same here. We see many official and inofficial presents (such as the items depicted in the recent photographs), souvenirs (she brought some items from Darmstadt such as a couple of paintings from a travel to Italy) and nippes; there is no real "concept" in those rooms. She loved the gaudy patterns so fashionable at the turn of the century (the imp. bedroom seems a mere crime to me - I could not have slept for one singel hour...). The Mauve Room was very much her workingstudy judging by the variety of papers etc. Her children would spend much time there as well.
It might have been expensive but all in all quite average style - which is not a criticism but just statement :)
« Last Edit: May 02, 2009, 10:01:53 AM by Alixz »
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Offline nena

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #534 on: April 04, 2009, 10:56:29 AM »
Umbrella and dress belonged to Tsarina:

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Offline Olga Maria

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #535 on: April 07, 2009, 10:22:16 PM »
From Lili Dehn:


The Empress favoured long, pointed footgear with very low heels: she usually wore suede, bronze or white shoes, never satin. "I can't bear satin shoes, they worry me," she would say. Her gowns, except those worn by her on State occasions, were very simple; she liked blouses and skirts, and she was greatly addicted to tea-gowns: her taste in dress was as refined as that of Queen Mary of England; like her she disapproved strongly of exaggerated fashions, and I shall not easily forget her condemnation when I once came to see her wearing a "hobble" skirt.

"Do you really like this skirt, Lili?" asked the Empress.

"Well . . . Madame," I said helplessly, "c'est la mode."

"It is no use whatever as a skirt," she answered. "Now, Lili, prove to me that it is comfortable - run, Lili, run, and let me see how fast you can cover the ground in it."

Needless to say, I never wore a "hobble" skirt again.

Tell me if I'm wrong, does she mean this? Hobble Skirt
Is this a tea gown?


Does she have sweaty feet that's why she worries wearing satin shoes?


« Last Edit: April 07, 2009, 10:34:34 PM by Großfürstin Ingrid Maria »

Amazing colored fotos  by the most wonderful Yelena Aleksandrovna. Endless thank you very much!

Offline Sarushka

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #536 on: April 08, 2009, 06:30:23 AM »
"Worry" can also mean "rub."
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world." ~Greg King

Offline CountessKate

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #537 on: April 08, 2009, 10:54:59 AM »
From Lili Dehn:


The Empress favoured long, pointed footgear with very low heels: she usually wore suede, bronze or white shoes, never satin. "I can't bear satin shoes, they worry me," she would say. Her gowns, except those worn by her on State occasions, were very simple; she liked blouses and skirts, and she was greatly addicted to tea-gowns: her taste in dress was as refined as that of Queen Mary of England; like her she disapproved strongly of exaggerated fashions, and I shall not easily forget her condemnation when I once came to see her wearing a "hobble" skirt.

"Do you really like this skirt, Lili?" asked the Empress.

"Well . . . Madame," I said helplessly, "c'est la mode."

"It is no use whatever as a skirt," she answered. "Now, Lili, prove to me that it is comfortable - run, Lili, run, and let me see how fast you can cover the ground in it."

Needless to say, I never wore a "hobble" skirt again.

Tell me if I'm wrong, does she mean this? Hobble Skirt
Is this a tea gown?


Does she have sweaty feet that's why she worries wearing satin shoes?




The dress in the picture is an exaggerated form of the hobble skirt - clearly designed to show its absurdities in comic postcard format.  The hobble skirt was the directoire fashion with a high waist and tapering skirt worn from about 1910 (have a look at the illustrations here: http://www.fashion-era.com/edwardian_fashion_plates.htm).  The 'hobble' was sometimes simply the narrowness of the skirt at the ankles, or an internal tie to keep the steps short.  It was never obtrusive. 

The illustrated dress could possibly be a tea gown, although tea gowns were usually much filmier and frillier - such as this V & A example:


which looked more appropriate for 'lounging' at tea, before dressing for dinner.  However, most tea gowns had a princess-style dress with a draped overdress which this outfit does have - but perhaps it's an early prototype. 

I would have thought satin shoes had a number of faults - they were fragile and gave insufficient support, particularly to a woman who had problems with standing for long periods of time, and they were easily damaged or marked and would not survive many wearings.  She didn't have to have particularly sweaty feet to dislike them.

Offline Olga Maria

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #538 on: April 08, 2009, 11:29:37 PM »
I saw a picture of Tatiana wearing a hobble skirt.
Thank you so much for your help, CountessKate. I saw a lot of pictures of Alix wearing tea gowns. No wonder it really is her favorite type of dress.

Amazing colored fotos  by the most wonderful Yelena Aleksandrovna. Endless thank you very much!

Offline tom_romanov

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Re: Alexandra's Personal World
« Reply #539 on: April 09, 2009, 10:33:06 AM »
Do you have a copy of this photo Ingrid?