Author Topic: What kind of Tsar would Alexei have been?  (Read 43975 times)

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Offline Lanie

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2005, 09:14:08 PM »
Alexei was bright much like his sister Olga but unlike her hated school (much like Anastasia); he disliked reading and things and was very poor in math as were all the Imperial children.  Really he did not have a good education; the tutors weren't "top notch" folks as would be expected for a tsesarevich, and his illness often broke into his education so it was very stunted.

AlexeiLVR

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2005, 09:33:10 PM »
Awwwwww thats so sad, I think he and his sisters needed a better education, why didn't the Tsar and Tsarina just get new tutors or atleast made their children work harder on subjects they had trouble in?

Maria_Pavlovna

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2005, 09:36:09 PM »
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Awwwwww thats so sad, I think he and his sisters needed a better education, why didn't the Tsar and Tsarina just get new tutors or atleast made their children work harder on subjects they had trouble in?


Good question Vera! But can't think of anthing in reply. sorry lol
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Maria_Pavlovna »

Offline Ortino

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2005, 10:50:17 PM »
It really didn't matter a whole lot how extensive the education of the girls was as long as they knew the skills of an "accomplished woman." They were never going to rule, so it didn't make a huge different how studious they were. As for Alexei, his illness interfered with his education at times since he had to recuperate. His education would have been more important than his sisters' and much more extensive in regular subjects as well as all the necessities for leadership, like diplomacy and military strategizing. The tutors the children had were fine, but you can't push people to be studious.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Ortino »

Offline Belochka

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2005, 12:08:57 AM »
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It really didn't matter a whole lot how extensive the education of the girls was as long as they knew the skills of an "accomplished woman." They were never going to rule, so it didn't make a huge different how studious they were.


Oh Dear!!!

Surely you are not suggesting that because OTMA were born female, then their female status was an impediment to good education?  

Their studies introduced analytical skills, the ability to converse in a number of European languages. Reading literature and poetry would have enriched their imaginations and empowered their use of language.

Acquisition of diplomacy skills would have also been a prime consideration for their own interactions.

You seem to be assuming that OTMA would have remained cocooned rather than venturing out and becoming proficient in an endeavor outside of the Imperial House.

What exactly are you inferring by: as long as they knew the skills of an "accomplished woman."?

>:( :( :o
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Belochka »


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pinklady

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2005, 04:27:39 AM »
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It really didn't matter a whole lot how extensive the education of the girls was as long as they knew the skills of an "accomplished woman." They were never going to rule, so it didn't make a huge different how studious they were.  


Yes, please explain......

Offline Lanie

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2005, 12:13:33 PM »
What Ortino I think is trying to say is that they were expected to know how to knit, dance, sew, play the piano--"womanly" things, considered of utmost importance in the Victorian and Edwardian times.  Generally women, especially girls in upper-class and royal homes, seemed not to have that great of an education...especially the royalty!  

The girls (except for Olga, except Gilliard mentioned she'd lost her zeal for learning when she became stressed during the war) were not very well-educated.  Yes, they knew languages but it's not like they had illustrious tutors like they were "expected" to (Alexei especially).  Their education wasn't all that great in a lot of ways.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Lanie »

Offline Ortino

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #22 on: March 08, 2005, 01:53:53 PM »
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What Ortino I think is trying to say is that they were expected to know how to knit, dance, sew, play the piano--"womanly" things, considered of utmost importance in the Victorian and Edwardian times.  Generally women, especially girls in upper-class and royal homes, seemed not to have that great of an education...especially the royalty!  


Exactly Lanie.  :)

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Acquisition of diplomacy skills would have also been a prime consideration for their own interactions.  


  For what exactly? What interactions would they need diplomcy for? They're not ruling.

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You seem to be assuming that OTMA would have remained cocooned rather than venturing out and becoming proficient in an endeavor outside of the Imperial House.  


  um, yeah. Can you find an example of this not happening during this time period?

As for Alexei, I don't think anyone could possibly determine how he would do as tsar at the time of his death. Personalities and attitudes change, and what he might have been at the age of 13 might not have been him 20 years down the road. While his illness when he was younger made him sympathetic to the suffering, he might have turned bitter as he grew older. His character for this reason is not a good way to determine his rule as tsar.


« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Ortino »

RissiaSunbeam1918

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2005, 07:08:50 PM »
Hey! (O my name here is a typo they wont let me fix by the way!)  I just turned fourteen, I have been studying the Romanovs scince I was ten.  I have always LOVED Alexei Nichoileavitch. Well, I think he'd make a great tsar! I mean, because of his illness I can see how he might not, but he was kind hearted, willful, and...loved life. This would be good for a tsar...I think accually...he's change Russia.

pinklady

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2005, 04:26:27 AM »
Yes, I see how you meant to say it now Ortino.
I do understand, and that that was how it was then amongst royalty and also the upper classes.

Tsarevna_Olga

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #25 on: June 05, 2005, 06:01:22 AM »
I think that if Alexey was a Tzar.The Russia could be in better condition....

Fawzia

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #26 on: June 05, 2005, 08:34:44 AM »
Not having his illness, I think he could've made an okay ruler, it's hard to say given that we don't know how he would have turned out.   But maybe not an okay ruler in Russia.   I don't know who could've handled Russia,  especially at that time, but whoever it would be would've needed to be a very intelligent, strong willed, determined force of nature to steer Russia out of where it was going.    Could Alexei handle such a Herculean task?   Besides, the children all seemed pretty sheltered to me, would he have been able to have effectively delt wih the plight of his people?    Would he have looked to his parents as an example?   :-/

Tsarevna_Olga

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #27 on: June 05, 2005, 09:29:48 AM »
you have reason Frizia!!!The situation In Russia unfortunately is not changed after revolution.Pheraps with Lenin,but with Stalin the RUssia was wroste than with Zar.
I think just that Alexey,a sensible and good child,could be a good tzar...

etonexile

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #28 on: June 05, 2005, 10:54:25 AM »
I should imagine that if WWI hadn't happened...Nicholas Alexandrovitch might have lived into the 1940's as Czar of an ever more democratic Russia...if only due to political realities...and whould have passed on the crown to his son or grandson....

RissiaSunbeam1918

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Re: Alexei and Being the Tsar
« Reply #29 on: June 05, 2005, 11:10:39 AM »
(I know I already posted on this a while ago, but I'm sort of changing my awnser, if that's ok.  :-/ )

I think he would have made an OK Tsar, but it sort of depends on what age he was and stuff. I think as a child, it looked like he was going to be a gentleman, but if Nicholas had lived into the 1940's, like etonexile suggested, something could have happened to drasticly change his personality from how he was as a child.

or say, he was still young when he was Tsar...say Nicholas got sick and died and Michael for some inplausable reason couldn't take over....looking at it from his point of view, I would have been terrefied. Leading all of Russia, in a bad time, and not full understanding what you should do would be enough to make me a poor leader no matter what my personality was.

Sorry if this is a bit confusing...it's sort of hard to say on a post, without taking up too much space.  ??? :-/

-Dana