Author Topic: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?  (Read 164635 times)

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Offline Erika

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #435 on: April 18, 2009, 05:03:20 AM »
Some more quotes from A Lifelong Passion.

KR Diary - 20 August 1902

An evant... I don't remember if I already noted this in the diary, but from the 8 August we have been waiting everyday for confirmation of the Empress's pregnancy. Now we have suddenly learnt that she is not pregnant, indeed that there never was any pregnancy, and that the symptoms that led one to suppose it were in fact only anaemia!
What a dissappointment for the Tsar and Tsaritsa! Poor things! Alix sent news of the sad discovery to Mama and my wife. Alix cried a lot when the doctors Ott and Girsh, who were at last admitted to see her, determined that not only was there no pregnancy, but there never been one. (...)


Xenia to Aprak - 20 August 1902 - Alexandria

Just a few words, dear Aprak, in addition to yesterday. This morning A.F. had a minor miscarriage - if it could be called a miscarriage at all! - that is to say a tiny ovule came out! Yesterday evening she had pains, and at night too, by morning it was all over when this event happened! Now at last it will be possible to make an announcement and tomorrow a bulletin will be published in the papers - with information about what happened. At last a natural way out of this unfortunate situation have been found. She is in bed - as a precaution, as there can sometimes be bleeding in such cases. Thank God so far she is in good health. (...)




RomanovsFan4Ever

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #436 on: April 18, 2009, 07:27:40 AM »
Thank you very much for posting these quotes!, now the situation is beginning to appear more clear.

Offline imperial angel

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #437 on: April 18, 2009, 09:38:50 AM »
Yes, those are the quotes from Xenia I was refering to. Basically, it was a false pregnancy.

Offline Grand Duchess Valeria

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #438 on: April 19, 2009, 03:25:10 AM »
...and that they declare it a miscarriage to anybody else...thats what we suspected.
And when he shall die, // Take him and cut him out in little starres, // And he will make the Face of heaven so fine, // That all the world will be in Love with night, // And pay no worship to the Garish Sun.

Offline LisaDavidson

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #439 on: May 28, 2009, 01:10:01 AM »
Thats correct. But I don't know, if it was THAT what she had or really a miscarriage or none of all. There are too much sources about it. Does anybody know, how much sources write about a miscarriage, a false pregnancy or nothing??...Maybe one can prove that on this way.

Without the Empress' medical records, I don't think that anything can be conclusively proven.

But, consider this: Alexandra's pregnancies from Olga through Anastasia resulted in a live births approximately every two years. So, it is likely that her next birth would have been in 1903, which I think would make a miscarriage likely (that's likely, not proven). By 1901, Alexandra had spent over 4 entire years of her life pregnant. Now, everybody's different, but I know of few woman, myself included, who could not tell the difference between really pregnant and fake pregnant. And, we know that Nicholas and Alexandra practiced birth control at various times in their marriage.

Based on the foregoing, my best guess is that the couple planned at least some of their pregnancies, that Alexandra had a miscarriage in 1903, took a well deserved reproductive rest, and then got pregnant with her son in late 1903, delivering him in August 1904.

Offline myhusbandswife

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #440 on: May 28, 2009, 07:58:30 AM »
I agree with Lisa. I think she had an actual miscarriage as well. Also in regards to the "why didn't they keep trying for another boy?" Wow, give the woman a break! :P  She had hard pregnancies and as a mother of 4 myself I know how very hard this can be. My two youngest were both born two months early because of difficult pregnancies. It is extremely hard on a women's body to produce children boom, boom, boom. One right after the other. My Dr. told me that your body needs at least two years to recover from pregnancy and child birth. It seems Alix waited two years between, but it's would still be hard on her body..to just recover and then start all over again. Not to mention she wasn't getting any younger! She was old to be having babies by yesteryear's standards. Just my two cents!

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #441 on: May 28, 2009, 10:23:17 AM »
A little OT but - just imagine a woman who has 12 children has been pregnant for nine years of her life.  Yet, there are those who do produce such large families even today.

I does seem interesting that Nicholas and Alexandra did have a childbirth schedule.  Not many in Victorian times would have any idea how to do that.

Offline LisaDavidson

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #442 on: June 10, 2009, 03:58:14 PM »
A little OT but - just imagine a woman who has 12 children has been pregnant for nine years of her life.  Yet, there are those who do produce such large families even today.

I does seem interesting that Nicholas and Alexandra did have a childbirth schedule.  Not many in Victorian times would have any idea how to do that.

And I forgot something I heard (I think) from a Romanov family member. Nicholas and Alexandra were told after Alexei's birth that it would be best for her to not have any more babies. They practiced birth control thereafter.

As I sidebar, I was told to not have any more after my second and I did basically the same thing.

Offline Blanch

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #443 on: July 10, 2009, 12:13:03 PM »
A little OT but - just imagine a woman who has 12 children has been pregnant for nine years of her life.  Yet, there are those who do produce such large families even today.

I does seem interesting that Nicholas and Alexandra did have a childbirth schedule.  Not many in Victorian times would have any idea how to do that.

And I forgot something I heard (I think) from a Romanov family member. Nicholas and Alexandra were told after Alexei's birth that it would be best for her to not have any more babies. They practiced birth control thereafter.

As I sidebar, I was told to not have any more after my second and I did basically the same thing.

I didn't know any of those facts, the childbirth schedule and the birth control. It almost seems hard to believe, considering the time we're talking about. I wonder how pregnancies were controlled back then. Also, does anyone know why Nicholas and Alexandra had that births' schedule? 

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #444 on: September 24, 2009, 10:59:45 AM »
I've come very late to this thread and haven't managed to read everything on it, so apologies if these points have been raised already. It looks to me very much as though Alexandra's sister Irene and Heinrich of Prussia practised birth control after the birth of their haemophiliac first child Waldemar. They married on 24 May 1888 and Waldemar was born on 20 March 1889, so Irene was pregnant almost immediately, suggesting two highly fertile young people. Yet their second child, Sigismund, was not born until 27 November 1896, more than seven years later, and Heinrich, another haemophiliac, not until 9 January 1900. Unless there were several miscarriages in between, it sounds like birth control which was only partially successful.

Incidentally, by the time Heinrich married Irene, his elder brother the Kaiser had four healthy sons, and the Kaiserin was heavily pregnant with a fifth, so the chances of Heinrich's issue succeeding were low. If Heinrich was concerned that Irene was a carrier before the marriage, he was presumably prepared to take the risk, and the fact that his issue would proabably not succeed may have been a factor. 

Offline LisaDavidson

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Re: Alexei had Hemophilia - Why Didn't Alix and Nicholas try Again?
« Reply #445 on: September 24, 2009, 11:16:43 AM »
A little OT but - just imagine a woman who has 12 children has been pregnant for nine years of her life.  Yet, there are those who do produce such large families even today.

I does seem interesting that Nicholas and Alexandra did have a childbirth schedule.  Not many in Victorian times would have any idea how to do that.

And I forgot something I heard (I think) from a Romanov family member. Nicholas and Alexandra were told after Alexei's birth that it would be best for her to not have any more babies. They practiced birth control thereafter.

As I sidebar, I was told to not have any more after my second and I did basically the same thing.

I didn't know any of those facts, the childbirth schedule and the birth control. It almost seems hard to believe, considering the time we're talking about. I wonder how pregnancies were controlled back then. Also, does anyone know why Nicholas and Alexandra had that births' schedule? 

It's likely that their doctor recommended some recovery time after each pregnancy, which could explain the schedule. Birth control in the late 19th century was mostly using the barrier method. Primarily condoms were used, but many women used sponges rinsed in vinegar.