Discussions about the Imperial Family and European Royalty > The Greek Royal Family

King George I & Queen Olga (nee Romanov) of Greece Part 1

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David MAc:
Alix,in her diary, records that sometime in late 1916, Queen Olga of Greece (then residing in Russia) made a hysterical scene at Tsarskoe claiming they were all doomed and Russia was on the verge of revolution. What happened toher after the revolution> anyone know.

LisaDavidson:
Olga was widowed in 1913 when her husband was assassinated. She returned to Russia, residing with her brother and his family. She nursed the wounded during the war just as did other Romanov women. Olga was able to escape the Bolsheviks and eventually return to Greece. She was regent for her son Constantine for a time. I believe she died around 1923.

Anya:
Olga died at the 18th of June, 1926. She was 74...

grandduchessella:

--- Quote ---Alix,in her diary, records that sometime in late 1916, Queen Olga of Greece (then residing in Russia) made a hysterical scene at Tsarskoe claiming they were all doomed and Russia was on the verge of revolution. What happened toher after the revolution> anyone know.
--- End quote ---


After the Revolution, she joined her Greek family in their exile in Italy. When her grandson Alexander I was on the throne (but the only royal allowed to remain), he suffered a particularly long, painful death due to blood poisoning. They wouldn't let his mother, Sophie, join him, but they did allow Olga (who'd been their Queen for about 50 yrs) to join him at his deathbed. When her son Constantine I was restored to the throne and then re-exiled, she shared this as well. Upon her death, she was at first buried in Italy, but upon the restoration (again!) of the throne, she was laid to rest beside her husband.

Martyn:
Olga, another member of the fascinating Konstantinovichi....It must have been terribly hard for Olga, to be exiled both from the land of her birth and from the country of which she had been queen.
I can not imagine what it must have been like for her to be married at 16, to leave home and country and be queen of a foreign land that had already deposed one monarch!  There is that famous story that she left Russia with jewellery worthy of an empress and a trunk full of dolls; that at one important royal function she was discovered hiding and sobbing because she felt out of her depth.
In spite of all this it would seem that she was greatly loved and admired in Greece; that she was the only person permitted to be with Alexander on his deathbed demonstrates that she was still respected in Greece

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