Author Topic: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II  (Read 444705 times)

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Offline PAVLOV

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #135 on: June 02, 2011, 07:07:41 AM »
My spelling of the name was incorrect. It is the Vorontsov Palace. Personally I think it is a very ugly building, an architectural mess. During WWll it was one of the Palaces chosen by Stalin as accommodation for the British delegations to the Yalta meeting. Rooseveldt and his mob stayed at Livadia, where the daily meetings were held, because the President was in a wheelchair, and the lower floor of the Livadia palace, including the Conference Room were on the same level, which made it easier for him to move about. he was already a very sick man and months away from death at the time.

Churchill and his delegation stayed at the Vorontsov palace, which they soon discovered was "bugged' by the Soviets. So every conversation they had at the dining room table was recorded by the KGB. The British delegation found out because one evening one of the delegates mentioned the fact that there were no lemons for the drinks. The next day the conservatory was filled with potted lemon trees !!
So they tested their theory and the next evening someone said how curious it was that there were so many empty aquarium tanks around the palace, but that there were no fish in them. The next day the tanks were filled with water and exotic fish !

I find it amazing how intrinsically stupid the Soviets were, even when it comes to small insignificant things like this, they gave themselves away.

Anyway, I think its quite an interesting story.
The carved lions you mention are at the foot of a staircase that leads down from the house to the gardens.   

Offline Brassov

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #136 on: June 11, 2012, 07:05:11 AM »
This topic seems to have died.  I have noticed some rather beautiful buildings on the Livadia Estate, not far from the Palace. I am wondering if anyone knows anything about them ? Were they accommodation for the court, or were they perhaps guest accommodation ? Who lived in them? Does anyone have any photographs ? I have been Googling like crazy but cannot find any information.
Thank You.

Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #137 on: August 18, 2012, 10:07:10 AM »
Paul Gilbert just posted the latest findings on the restoration of Livadia Palace:

Unique Discoveries Found During Restoration of Livadia Palace

http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/news/505news.html
инок Николай

Offline IvanVII

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #138 on: August 19, 2012, 01:30:20 AM »
Great news for another great link to history.

Offline EmmyLee

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #139 on: August 22, 2012, 10:12:54 PM »
It's great to read some news about Livadia! I hadn't realized that it had gotten into such bad shape, but then, I've never been there before and have only seen photos of the palace and its interior. I'm sort of surprised that they restored the lift-- I would be very surprised if they actually let visitors use it-- maybe they'll do demonstrations on how it works?

Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #140 on: March 23, 2013, 04:05:18 PM »
On the night of 5/6 July 1942 the Soviet air force launched a bombing raid on Livadia hoping to kill a number of German officers who were celebrating the fall of Sevastopol there. The officers fled to the basemnet during the raid. The bombs supposedly killed a number of drivers waiting outside. Does anyone know if the palace recieved any damage during this or any other raids during WW II/GPW? (GPW Great Patriotic War).

Offline Alexandre Mikhaelovitch

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #141 on: August 27, 2013, 09:11:09 AM »

Offline IvanVII

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #142 on: August 27, 2013, 08:10:14 PM »
I wonder where they found it......It's amazing that after all this time, it stilll matches the paneling perfectly

Offline Rodney_G.

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #143 on: August 28, 2013, 05:29:55 PM »
OTMA's Bookcase Returned to Livadia

http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/blog/index.blog?entry_id=1449368

Sweet! I have my biases, I admit, but I prefer to see displays of the Grand Duchesses' classroom than to see and think of those rooms as occupied during the Yalta conference of February, 1945, when that room would likely have been occupied by some  middle-aged Allied diplomat or military officers, American, British,or Soviet, intent on reconfiguring Europe in some unnatural way, to their respective advantages, and not doing such a great job, IMHO, though that's another topic for sure.
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Offline Michael HR

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #144 on: August 29, 2013, 06:13:58 AM »
I know when I get around to visiting Russia Livadia will be on my plans.
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Offline IvanVII

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #145 on: August 29, 2013, 10:16:04 PM »
OTMA's Bookcase Returned to Livadia

http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/blog/index.blog?entry_id=1449368

Sweet! I have my biases, I admit, but I prefer to see displays of the Grand Duchesses' classroom than to see and think of those rooms as occupied during the Yalta conference of February, 1945, when that room would likely have been occupied by some  middle-aged Allied diplomat or military officers, American, British,or Soviet, intent on reconfiguring Europe in some unnatural way, to their respective advantages, and not doing such a great job, IMHO, though that's another topic for sure.
If the room was occupied it most likely would have been an American as Livadia is where Roosevelt stayed in addition to where most of the talks were held.

The point you bring up is one of the things that must constantly vex museum curators. Livadia, personal home built by the last Russian Emperor vs. host of Yalta an important historical event.

Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #146 on: August 30, 2013, 11:59:46 AM »
Quote

The point you bring up is one of the things that must constantly vex museum curators. Livadia, personal home built by the last Russian Emperor vs. host of Yalta an important historical event.

Yes, every respective museum head there has had to face that issue.

When we were there once in 1976, the poor guide didn't know her material very well and kept mixing up who was who in the large painting of the Conference members in the main ball room.
We had the son of the former US ambassador to the USSR with us, and he kept correcting the poor woman.
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Offline Clemence

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #147 on: March 25, 2014, 03:57:31 PM »
I never thought of the name Livadia, that indeed always seemed somehow familiar to me, but tonight I descovered that the name was forst given at the estate by the Greek Lambros Katsonis, who named the land granded to him by the zar after a Greek failed revolt against the Turks. The name was given in honour of the Greek city of Livadeia.

Quote
Formerly granted to Lambros Katsonis and later a possession of the Potocki family, the Livadia estate became a summer residence of the Russian imperial family in the 1860s, when architect Ippolito Monighetti built a large palace, a small palace, and a church there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Livadia_Palace

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Livadeia
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Offline lilianna

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #148 on: April 02, 2014, 06:04:25 AM »
Restoration dvortsa.Video Livadia. News on April 6.

http://www.ntv.ru/novosti/881439/

Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Livadia, Palace of Nicholas II
« Reply #149 on: May 19, 2014, 09:06:17 AM »
I never thought of the name Livadia, that indeed always seemed somehow familiar to me, but tonight I descovered that the name was forst given at the estate by the Greek Lambros Katsonis, who named the land granded to him by the zar after a Greek failed revolt against the Turks. The name was given in honour of the Greek city of Livadeia.

Quote
Formerly granted to Lambros Katsonis and later a possession of the Potocki family, the Livadia estate became a summer residence of the Russian imperial family in the 1860s, when architect Ippolito Monighetti built a large palace, a small palace, and a church there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Livadia_Palace

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Livadeia

Well, there is another interesting link between the Greek and Russian Livadias:

The Greek monastic saint, Seraphim of Livadia -- his feast-day falls on the birthday of Tsar Nicholas II: May 6th, O. S.
http://orthodoxwiki.org/Seraphim_of_Livadeia
инок Николай