Author Topic: Private rooms of the Winter Palace  (Read 693640 times)

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Offline Joanna

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #390 on: February 05, 2010, 07:14:43 PM »
cont'd

Interestingly, at the insistence of Ammosov Stasov tried to make changes to the design of furnaces in 1839. Thus metal pipes have been replaced by clay, but finding that they are very slowly heat the air and enhanced firebox crack and allow the smoke, he returned to the metal tube (50).

In the spring of 1839 stoves and fireplaces remained in the Winter Palace, mainly as a familiar element of the state rooms (51). Pneumatic device for furnaces in the Winter Palace N. Ammosov was awarded a gold medal and received 1500 acres of land along with the personal approval of Nicholas I, the quality of the furnace in its design. In the palace "artisan company" the largest state spetsalistov was busy just to maintain the heating system. Stove and fireplace business engaged in the palace "master and two apprentices, eight Pechnikov and six students." Pipe case involved "a master, journeyman, three pipe manufacturers and two students." Cleaned the pipes "master and two apprentices, chimney sweeps, twelve and seven students (52).

But in "ammosovskoy" the heating system had its drawbacks. Already in the early years 1840h view was that these furnaces overdry air, that is injurious to health. Apparently, in connection with the design of furnaces N. Ammosova invited to the Winter Palace in March 1841, where he measured the humidity in all the palace premises. This abnormality was identified, and tables of measurements of moisture were published. Nonetheless, these rumors were very tenacious, as an official of the Ministry of Imperial Household VS Krivenko in the notes mentioned that the majestic Winter Palace "absolutely not suited for private life. Alexander II, emphysema patient, suffering from amosovskogo heating, much of the dry heated air from poor ventilation, air vents in the bedroom of his ill-shut at night room vystyvala "(53). Therefore, since 1863 in the Winter Palace begins to set up a new, local, heating system, which was completed by mid-1870h period. In it were based on "ognevozdushnye furnace" design IK Krol and Smirnov. In the mid-1880s in the Winter Palace, work began on the third installation of the local heating system.

It was a system of water heating. To do this in one of the internal light yards west of the Winter Palace was built boiler. And on the roof of the palace, for the optical telegraph tower over "its own entrance, was built wind-tower, which has made a significant discordance in the usual architectural appearance of the palace. Thus, by 1917 at the Winter Palace in parallel there have been three technically different heating systems are not integrated into a single network. From 1840h years in the Winter Palace operated pneumatic kiln NA Ammosova, heated most of the palace. In the 1860-1870h years created a local system "ognevozdushnyh furnaces" for the private apartments of Emperor Alexander II, who suffered from asthma, and his wife - Empress Maria Alexandrovna, bolevshey tuberculosis. Since the late 1880s Northwest corner block of the Winter Palace and the New Hermitage building heated by a central water heating system, created by an engineer Wynn.

Along with other engineering services and changing the lighting system of the Winter Palace. Throughout the pre-revolutionary history of the Winter Palace illuminated by candles. There were certain standards of "Candle allowance, dependent on the status of persons and persons living in the palace.

Thus, in 1826, three maids of honor were given a day 8 Candles. Of these "ordinary white" -- 4 pieces, yellow night - 1 piece, 3 pieces of the sebaceous (54). Tallow candles were not fragrant, and therefore they were used in the utility room of the palace or duty night lighting. After the sumptuous balls in them and arranged the room tallow candles "in tin, long, filled with water candlesticks" (55). Wax candles used in homes, during dances and other ceremonies, but they were short-lived, as quickly guttering and had to be replaced frequently. In memoir evidence, in the XVIII century palace during the holidays, in order to highlight the huge halls were built in addition special pyramid on which the "three thousand candles of white wax (56). During the repair work in the Winter Palace after a fire in 1837, it was envisaged increase in the number of candles in the chandeliers (57). In order to expedite the procedure for replacing the chandeliers in the hundreds of candles used special tin tube with a spring-loaded bottoms to facilitate the extraction of candle ends. The principal means of lighting the candles were in the Winter Palace before 1860h period. French writer Theophile Gautier, describing a ball at the Winter Palace in 1860, left one of the recent description of their use: "... countless candles stood in Kandy lyabrah the eaves ... entire streams of light filled the vast hall as if by magic" (58).

Later, despite the shift to gas lighting, and then to electric lighting, the palace continued to be widely used candles. According to the inventory treasury of things that were half of Alexander II, in each of the rooms have chandeliers and lamps with candles. Typically, these were twin candelabra, each of which was from four to seven cones. Directly in the office of Emperor was couple candelabra of seven trumpets. If chandeliers were all rooms, a chandelier with candles only some of them. Thus, of the eight residential premises of the Emperor chandeliers, equipment percentage of surveyed under the wax candles, were only four (59). In this way lit room was the reception, which can burn 72 candles. Next came the library - 48 candles, cabinet - 38 candles and training - 36 candles.

cont'd
Joanna

Offline Joanna

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #391 on: February 05, 2010, 07:15:29 PM »
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In the early years 1860h replaced candles come gas jets. For the first time the issue of their installation in the Winter Palace stood in 1850h years in the construction of the New Hermitage. But the suggestion of the architect Ludwig Klenze the installation of gas lamps in the halls of the museum was rejected by Nicholas I because of the possibility of fire. January 31, 1851 the king approved the plan for coverage of the New Hermitage, consisting of 9 thousand 949 chandeliers with candles (60). It was a huge "hozyastvo", so to maintain good order and services in the "artisan company" Winter Palace employed 12 people "in roofing, lamp and tube business.

In the spring of 1861 has started equipping the organizational preparations for the Winter Palace, gas lighting. May 25, 1861 obergofmarshal Shuvalov sent prescription Winter Palace manager engineer generalmayoru Cuba develop project lighting palace gas "portholes". For June 18, 1861 Cuba said Count Shuvalov on the tender, which was attended by two contractors - Prussian citizen inzhenermehanik Louis Zaps and some GIs Shishko. Palace "Generals of the cutlets" tried to take money, so the general obergofmarshala Cuba drew attention to the fact that the project Zapsa more beneficial, since I had to do court administration in 4960 rubles, 6200 rubles against Szyszko. From the project Zapsa indicated that he agrees "to make ... a good spot with all possible savings.

All he intended to set the burner at the palace in 1670, of which daily expected to use 554 burners. Given the potential gas explosion, Zapsom were developed strict rules for the use of gas equipment in the Winter Palace. According to them, to smenulampovschikam came lamplighters. Keys that open the valves of gas burners were made as time to "no one could have without a key to open the valves of burners. Moreover, for each "race" gas pipes had a special key. Key to the main switchboard of the gas valve was only in Zapsa. Gas lighting was supplied to the palace Petersburg gas company. Indications about used up gas were measured once a month, and payment for it made every three months. All Zapsa were adopted in November 1861, and the contract was signed with him for three years. It is noteworthy that for Zapsom an eye. In November 1861 "for constant supervision" of the gas lighting was appointed lieutenant sluzhitelskoy team Winter Palace Efimov (61).

The newspapers mentioned that the gas jets "special improvement" produced an extraordinary effect, highlighting the main rooms of the palace. But along with gas jets continued to use candles. The photograph of the Cabinet of Empress Maria Feodorovna, made in mid-1870h, respectively, at her table, we see two candelabra on the two candles. To contain the gas industry in the manner it was quite troublesome affair. In addition, there were problems and hygienic nature.

Thus, in private rooms suffer from asthma Emperor Alexander II gas lighting was not used at all, and the inventory items appear only under the chandeliers and candelabra candles. In the first half of the 1880s in the Winter Palace begins to form a system of electric lighting. It should be noted that Alexander III actively encouraged the holding of electric lighting in the Gatchina Palace back in 1881. These papers dealt Lieutenant Smirnov, who commanded the detachment moryakovminerov sent to the palace to prevent the possible undermining and explosions. Alexander III personally interested in these works, repeatedly listening to the reports of a sailor (62). Nevertheless, this innovation has not led to complete elimination of the old lighting fixtures.

Were phased out only the gas jets. Therefore, the electric light and light candles side by side in the Winter Palace until 1917. For the first time in the Winter Palace system of electric lighting, mounted engineer of the palace administration VL Popov, was tested in 1885 for the Christmas holidays. Work began in September 1884. It was supposed to arrange the electric lighting in Pompeevskoy Gallery and in the garden of the Hermitage Pavilion. Work on the installation of lights and wiring were assigned to the company "Siemens". Supposed to feed the bulbs from two locomobiles, each of which was designed for 40 bulbs. Sadiq Hermitage pavilion was covered by ten frosted crystal lamps, which were delivered to a glass factory. Somewhat later a similar project was implemented in Elagin palace. On the implementation of this project was spent just over 11 000 rubles.

The novelty was impressed at the capital's beau monde, and it was decided to reduce the cost for the purchase of the Winter Palace own portable engine (63). At one of the balls in 1887, broke 12 000 incandescent lamps. In early 1888 the project engineer VL Popov was built in the small courtyard of the New Hermitage stationary electric power station in DC. Six years later, architect A. Krasovsky built a small power plant is already at an alternating current in the courtyard of the Hermitage Theater, which provided coverage of the auditorium and foyer of the theater. This plant existed until 1945, then was pulled down.

cont'd
Joanna

Offline Joanna

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #392 on: February 05, 2010, 07:17:31 PM »
cont'd

New electric chandeliers and sconces, part of which was produced from drawings by architect R. Melzer, were richly decorated with crystal pendants. At the huge bronze chandelier in the grand halls have been installed bulbs, stylized under the candle. A photograph of George Hall, made from the gallery, well visible these "electric candles". At the press describes a ball at the Winter Palace in 1890, mentioned that apart from "the chandeliers and candelabra illuminates the halls curb of 1000 bulbs, which circled the top of the rails chorus ... Tropical garden illuminated from above the moonlight like a matte high electric lamp (64).

Based on the inventory of the rooms of Alexander III, compiled in 1888, we can conclude that by this time gas lighting system was completely dismantled. But at the same time, along with electric lighting, continued to be used and the usual candles. The electric chandeliers acting as the overall lighting, and chandeliers with candles - an intimate, local. All fourteen private rooms of Alexander III in the Winter Palace were equipped with electric chandeliers. But the number of bulbs in them was different. Most rooms chandeliers were installed at shestvosem bulbs. The largest chandelier - 30 bulbs - was in the office of Alexander III. Thus under the candle chandeliers are not as bulky. Number of horns on them down to trehchetyreh. In purely personal space - in the dressing room and bathroom - was a small chandelier at six lights and a modest brass sconces two horns (65).

When Nicholas II lived in the Winter Palace after his marriage to Alice of Hesse, in their living rooms all the wiring has been completely updated. In their private apartments of the prevailing local, intimate lighting. On the walls were numerous sconces with glass and cloth caps, performed in modern style. On the tables were also a massive electric lamps. However, the candles still were in daily use, because the photographs electric lamps continued to coexist with candelabra. Lighting kerosene lamps used mainly in pridvornosluzhitelskih homes.

Important place in the daily life of the palace occupied by lifting machines. Lifts for lifting people have been used in Europe in the XVII century. Their inventor can be considered a member of the Paris Academy Vilaera, who designed the first elevator to the palace complexes of Louis XIV. Installed in the palaces of Paris and Versailles "flying chairs" were very popular among European aristocracy, but after several accidents this fashion gradually faded away (66). Popularity preserved only the machinery for recovery laid tables during a private dinner. Such machines have appeared in Russia during the reign of Peter I in suburban dvortsahpavilonah.

These machines have been installed in the Winter Palace in 1770h, respectively. However, in 1795, much older Catherine II ordered to pay in the living quarters are the Hermitage Rooms, where the lifting machines and Standpipe floor (67). Since the submission of our standard of living changed. Technique becomes more reliable. Front Jordan Staircase was indispensable for the magnificent palace receptions, but in everyday life rise to the third floor of the palace for the elderly and often not very healthy people require considerable effort. As always in the palaces importance attached to everyday conveniences, the Winter Palace reappear "lifting machine".

By the beginning of the XIX century there were several designs of elevators. For low-rise buildings, with the rise of "cradle" on two floors were used screw lifting machines with manual transmission.

Nuts were installed on the bottom of the lift cabin, and the lifting screw passed through the entire height of the elevator shaft. The second type were lifts, which were not limited Floors. Hoisting mechanism located at the top of the shaft and could be operated a variety of lift system (manually, hydraulic, gas, kerosene, motor). The third type of lifts are hydraulic pistons, also fixed to the bottom of the lift cabin.

Their design features was that the hydraulic mechanisms "lift" located in the basement. Before the fire of 1837, the Cabinet of Emperor Nicholas I was in the northwestern projection of the Winter Palace, on the third floor, where there was a living half the emperor, over Empress Alexandra Feodorovna. Near ladder was installed at 1820h years "lifting machine" that connects all three floors. This arrangement was made at Kolpino plant. At the same time in the Emperor's study door with a vestibule to "lift" has been solved in a "cabinet". It was very typical of the king of interior solutions. Similarly, in the closet, was removed and bathing shell "of the emperor. Ruling person is not neglected facilities, but since the appearance of technical innovations and household clash with the prevailing view of the imperial cabinet, they tried to hide in the cupboards.

After a fire in 1838 installed a new elevator, designed inzhenerpolkovnikom AA Fullonom. In the "lift" its design foot screw was attached to the bottom platform, and advanced design operated on the principle of vertical piston. The very cradle was made of mahogany with brass bars, door and handrails. Inside was a chair of mahogany, upholstered in red morocco. Machine operable by hand. Special gear transferred movement to the screw lift machines, which will reduce the "push" platform with a cradle.

cont'd
Joanna

Offline Joanna

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #393 on: February 05, 2010, 07:18:56 PM »
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According to the project in 1838 "gig" tied not three, but only the lower two floors of residential half of the imperial family and was intended primarily for the Empress and the other women (68). This lifting machine is operated by the muscular effort of special workers. By 1853 "lifting machine" has been established at several entrances of the Winter Palace. They are installed in the suburban palaces. Thus, in the Gatchina Palace elevator appeared in 1854. As wear and tear and obsolescence of these mechanisms will be replaced periodically. In 1860 he was pulled down the old elevator at the entrance of the Minister of the Imperial Court (69). In 1861 began the mass installation of new elevators at the main entrance of the palace. All four elevators were built: the property of their Majesties' entrance, half of the late Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, and half of the heir. These structures were relatively cheap and cost the treasury just 500 rubles (70)
.
At 1860h years in the Winter Palace were used in two basic designs "winders". More capacious "lifting machine" still driven by the muscular effort rabochihlifterov. This circuit device elevators worked for 60 years, until the mid-1880s. Thus, in the years 1882-1883 during the installation of new elevators in the building of the Old Hermitage and the Commandant of the entrance were installed just such elevators. The document mentions that during the works were
are two "lifting machine driven by workers" (71). Sama lift cabin was located on the "screw lifting machine. These works, and all other mechanical, ordered the Palace of the refinery San Galli. These cost of court administration in 9000 rubles, while the plant has provided for these "lifting machine" guarantee of two years.

Along with the spacious "winders" hand-operated, used and more compact "lift chairs", which are activated hydraulically already. Thus, in 1862, was specially laid special plumbing "for Lifting the chair of the emperor. " These works have already been treated in 1400 rubles (72).

A similar device - "mashinnopodemny chair" - was established in 1871 at the entrance of the Minister of the Imperial Court (73). When raising them required some caution, because the "lift chair" was not protected against the rails on which he was raised. Therefore it was possible to observe how the "cradle" raised up their passengers. One of the pupils of the Smolny Institute, recalling his visit to the Winter Palace, left a description of the "Rapture": "Great Princess obligingly put her (74) in the chair of the Empress, rising through the machine at the top. The heir was behind her. "Grandma" seemed to be ascending to heaven, and heir to her bylkak angelomhranitelem. We ran down the stairs, and I tried to keep pace with the "rising", we had so much fun to look at them. " Sometimes this "open" design became the cause of accidents. Thus, in the 1880s years of the Empress Maria Feodorovna injured leg after she fell between the "Cradles" and rigid construction elevator.

In the mid-1880s "lifting machine" on the manual transmission began to be replaced Elevators are equipped with hydraulic drive. In the spring of 1886 a machine was installed on the stairs of his Majesty. In sparing design description stated that "the upper part of the cylinder machine attached to the pair of iron rails." In the porch of her Majesty's cylinder machine was absorbed into the ground and it is not permutation had to be done for the past 20 years ... for a proper motion of the cradle and redesigned the floor of a wooden cradle in a metal "(75).

Inside the bucket was installed folding bench mahogany on brass hinges and brackets. Doors lift machines were manufactured from Two gilt bronze grilles. Inside cradle lifting machine was covered with a cover of unbleached linen. Outside frame cradle was covered with a cover of
oilcloth (76).

In 1904, the thrust of the hydraulic actuator lifts in the entrance of the empress and the Small Hermitage tried to increase the energy supply additional pressure pipe to water tank lifting machines at the entrance of her Majesty. But the work in connection with the war were
postponed to 1905 (77). After Russkoyaponskoy war and revolution began gradually update lifting apparatus of the Winter Palace. At that time the equipment palace elevators on electricity from batteries. In 1913, the project engineer A. Stiegler (technical office engineer R. E. Erickson) on the Soviet entrance of the Hermitage was built lift with elektropodemnoy machine, installed in the attic of the palace. Elevator shafts passed through three floors, lifting height is 16 meters (78).

In addition to the various systems of heating, lighting, water supply and sanitation since 1833 in the tower northwest projection in the facade acted optical telegraph, the link between St. Petersburg and Warsaw. In 1841 engineer PL Schilling was carried telegraphy palace to the building of the General Staff. In 1882 was held telephone palace premises. So way, it can be argued that the history of technology in the Winter Palace became a kind of experimental "testing ground" for the testing and implementation of various devices engineering equipment.

cont'd
Joanna

Offline Joanna

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #394 on: February 05, 2010, 07:19:51 PM »
cont'd

1 Devyatova C. For cleavage of the neck to wash? / / Motherland. 2003. № 7. 101.
2 Hermitage. History of Construction and Architecture Building / Construction. 1989. S. 191.
3 Russia State Historical Archive (RSHA). F. 469. Op. 12. Part 1. Information taken from the description of the inventory of cases.
4 Ibid. F. 472. Op. 66. D. 588. L. 55.
5 Ibid. F. 479. Op. 1. D. 355. L. 1-29.
6 Ibid. F. 469. Op. 9. D. 340. L. 33 ob.
7 Ibid. Op. 12. Part 1. Information taken from the description of the inventory of cases.
8 Ibid.
9 Ibid. Op. 11. Information taken from the description of the inventory of cases.
10 Ibid.
11 Ibid. F. 479. Op. 1. D. 2093. L. 4.
12 Ibid. L. 31.
13 Ibid. F. 472. Op. 66. D. 500. L. 2.
14 Hermitage. History of Construction and Architecture Building / Construction. 1989. P. 142.
15 Ibid. S. 125.
16 Ibid. P. 149.
17 Bashutsky A. Renewal of the Winter Palace in St. Petersburg. SPb., 1839. P. 34.
18 RSHA. F. 475. Op. 2. D. 186. L. 202.
19 Ibid. F. 469. Op. 11. Information taken from the description of the inventory of cases.
20 Hermitage. The history of construction and architecture of buildings. L., 1989. S. 256.
21 RSHA. F. 469. Op. 11. Information taken from the description of the inventory of cases.
22 Ibid.
23 Ibid.
24 Ibid. F. 536. Op. 1. D. 728. L. 1.
25 Ibid. F. 469. Op. 11. Information taken from the description of the inventory of cases.
26 Meylunas A., Mironenko S. Nicholas and Alexandra. Love Story. M., 1998. 136.
27 Ibid. P. 149.
28 Hotels Manuscripts of the National Library (RR NLR). F. 741. Op. 2. D. 148. L. 60.
29 RSHA. F. 475. Op. 1. D. 381. L. 1-5.
30 Assumption AI Pavlovsky Palace / / Zapiski of the Imperial Moscow Archaeological Society. M., 1913.
24, pp. S. 446.
31 Vilchkovsky SN Tsarskoe Selo. SPb., 1911. S. 140.
32 RSHA. F. 475. Op. 1. D. 472. L. 14.
33 Ibid. F. 536. Op. 1. D. 760. L. 12.
34 Devyatova S. decree. cit. 102.
35 A. The Romanovs Molin. The road to Calvary. Look forensic expert. SPb., 2002. S. 248.
36 Hermitage. The history of construction and architecture of buildings. S. 159.
37 RSHA. F. 475. Op. 2. D. 186. L. 201. Part 1.
38 RR NLR. F. 741. Op. 2. D. 148. L. 109.
39 Suslov, VA Nicholas I and the Hermitage / / Clio. 2003. № 2. S. 218.
40 RSHA. F. 475. Op. 1. D. 472. L. 14.
41 Ibid.
42 Ibid. D. 743. L. 12.
43 Ibid. F. 536. Op. 1. D. 880. L. 12.
44 Hermitage. The history of construction and architecture of buildings. Building. 1989. 88.
45 Ibid. 117.
46 Sivkov A. VPStasov and his work on the restoration of the Winter Palace after the fire of 1837, Leningrad, 1948. C. 1.
47 RSHA. F. 475. Op. 2. D. 186. L. 202. Part 1.
48 Ammosov N. brief description of the pneumatic otaplivanii and air quality on health behavior. M., 1844. C. 31.
49 And he is. Notes on the expense of testing air furnaces. SPb., 1863. P. 11.
50 And he is. Comments on article by Hodneva on air furnaces. SPb., 1861. C. 2.
51 Hermitage. The history of construction and architecture of buildings. S. 178.
52 RR NLR. F. 741. Op. 2. D. 148. L. 109.
53 Ibid. F. 1000. Op. 2. D. 672. L. 45.
54 RSHA. F. 469. Op. 10. 153. L. 18 on.
55 Assumption AI Ordinance. cit. S. 444.
56 RR NLR. F. 741. Op. 2. D. 148. L. 153.
57 RSHA. F. 475. Op. 2. D. 186. L. 202. Part 1.
58 RR NLR. F. 741. Op. 2. D. 148. L. 120.
59 RSHA. F. 475. Op. 1. D. 472. L. 1-14.
60 Suslov, VA decree. cit. S. 217.
61 RSHA. F. 469. Op. 11. D. 137. L. 1-29.
62 RR NLR. F. 1000. Op. 2. D. 672. L. 22.
63 RSHA. F. 536. Op. 1. D. 210. L. 3-4.
64 RR NLR. F. 741. Op. 2. D. 148. L. 171.
65 RSHA. F. 536. Op. 1. D. 760. L. 1-14.
66 Collegiate Brockhaus and Efron. SPb., 1898. 47, pp. P. 134.
67 RSHA. F. 475. Op. 2. D. 186. Part 1. L. 136.
68 Pashkova TL Main staircase northwestern projection in the facade of the Winter Palace / / Architectural notebooks. SPb., 1994.
Vol. 1. S. 35-43.
69 RSHA. F. 469. Op. 11. Information taken from the description of the inventory of cases.
70 Ibid. Op. 12. Part 1. Information taken from the description of the inventory of cases.
71 Ibid. Op. 11. D. 217. L. 1.
72 Ibid. Op. 12. Part 1. Information taken from the description of the inventory of cases.
73 Ibid. Op. 11. Information taken from the description of the inventory of cases.
74 directrix Smolny YF Adlerberg.
75 RSHA. F. 536. Op. 1. D. 175. L. 6.
76 Ibid. D. 880. L. 4.
77 Library RGIA / / Report on the activities of St. Petersburg palace administration during the 1904 LA 94.
78 RSHA. F. 475. Op. 2. D. 177. L. 1-2.

Joanna

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #395 on: March 28, 2010, 09:34:28 AM »
Does anyone have a floor plan of the children's rooms as they were just before the Great War.

Constantinople

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #396 on: March 31, 2010, 02:40:59 PM »
Very interesting
does anyone have pllans for the Kitchen? or photos

..dlnec1

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #397 on: April 02, 2010, 05:00:49 PM »
If I remember correctly, there was a great kitchen beneath the Cathedral. I think this was the great or grand kitchen for the court, I am not sure it was for the Imperial Family.

Constantinople

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #398 on: April 07, 2010, 04:19:22 PM »
thanks
I think a thread of food and the kitchens might be a good idea

PAVLOV

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #399 on: April 21, 2010, 10:39:50 AM »
Yes I agree, I am very interested in the service rooms, and what went on behind the scenes.
There is a topic " Dining with the Tsars" on this Forum, but it is not very interesting. Perhaps someone could embelish it a bit with new info.

PAVLOV

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #400 on: May 19, 2010, 07:22:01 AM »
I found the following interesting entry in the Diary of Catherine the Great from the beginning of 1751, which is quite interesting :

" At the end of September we returned to the Winter Palace. At that time the court had so little furniture than even the mirrors, beds,chairs, tables and commodes that served us in the Winter Palace went with us to the Summer Palace and from there to Peterhof, and even followed us to Moscow. A good number broke and were damaged in these journeys, and they were given to us in this battered state, so that we had a hard time using them. As is was necessary to have an express order from the Empress to obtain others, and since most of the time access to her was difficult or even impossible, I resolved to buy myself commodes, tables and the most necessary furniture with my money for both the Winter Palace and Summer Palaces, and then when I went from one residence to the other, I found everything that I needed without the difficulty and the inconveniences of transport. This arrangement pleased the Grand Duke, he did the same for his apartment. At Oranienbaum, which belonged to the Grand Duke, we had everything we needed at our own expense. In my apartment there, I spent my own money to avoid all disagreement and difficulty because His Imperial Highness spent freely on all his fancies, when it came to me, in general he was anything but generous. But since what I spent from my purse on my apartments, serves to embellish his house, he was content "

I wonder if any of her furniture from this time has survived, and is in the Winter Palace today ?

Offline Alexandre Mikhaelovitch

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #401 on: October 25, 2010, 05:14:23 PM »


This furniture was found from private home in Finland and is going for sale. The owners were a bit surprised when they learned were it was from. Hopefully it gets back to Winter Palace.

This furniture white and silver of this Alexandra Feodorovna's boudoir was saled in january 2009 : it is still in private finish collection :












Offline Alexandre Mikhaelovitch

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Re: Private rooms of the Winter Palace
« Reply #402 on: November 09, 2010, 09:36:54 AM »
Another view of the silver furniture of the Alexandra Foedorovna's boudoir in the Winter Palace (Finland , january 2009 ) :

« Last Edit: November 09, 2010, 09:38:38 AM by Alexandre Mikhaelovitch »


ThomB

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« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 04:16:50 PM by ThomB »