Author Topic: Bonaparte-Wyse family  (Read 12769 times)

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Offline grandduchessella

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Bonaparte-Wyse family
« on: March 16, 2010, 02:49:57 PM »
We were discussing Marie Bonaparte on another thread, and in doing some digging around, came across this branch of the family. It's Bonaparte founder was Marie's great-aunt Laetitia.  I don't know much about them and a search of the Forum came upon Marc's request for some information on one claiming to be a Princess of Solms but that was all.  Waterford has a museum, Bonaparte Wyse Waterford Museum of Treasures, which contains some Bonaparte memorabilia.

Some members:

Laetitia (d. 1872), daughter of Lucien Bonaparte, married Thomas Wyse (an Irish politician and diplomat) in 1821. Thomas Wyse was educated "at Stonyhurst in England and Trinity College Dublin he went on the Grand Tour; while in Italy he met Letitia, 'Venus of the Bonapartes'. A marriage was arranged with a promised dowry of £10,000 that Thomas hoped would help to alleviate the debts of the family estates in Waterford. The marriage that took place in 1821 in Viterbo, Italy, was already doomed by the time of the birth of the first child, Napoleon Alfred. Thomas's father-in-law the Prince of Canino had, at Thomas's request, his wayward daughter committed to a convent, with Vatican approval. When Thomas indicated that he was returning to Waterford, the Bonapartes were anxious that he bring Letitia. En route to Waterford their second son William Charles was conceived.

Back in Waterford, Thomas, one of the Commissioners for the building of the new Houses of Parliament in London, engaged the architect there, Augustus Welby Pugin, to carry out the work on the new Manor of St. John's at Roanmore. The ancient manor had been demolished by Thomas's father's land agent. While Thomas devoted himself to the 1826 election campaign, speaking in Irish to the 'mountainy men', Letitia enjoyed the company of Villiers Stuart, wearing slippers with orange ribbons which were ground into the dust as she danced. As Thomas's political star rose, his marriage finally collapsed, Letitia fled Waterford, the weather seeming to have been the last straw. The volatile, beautiful and extravagant Princess Letitia was until her death, an embarrassment to Thomas, having three further children by other men. Marriage to the serious-minded, politically-ambitious but impoverished Thomas was hardly conducive to the happiness and expectations of a French princess brought up in Italy's sunnier climes. Thomas had never been a popular local figure and his glacial personality could not appeal to an electorate bound up in the miseries of famine and mass emigration. Thomas lost his parliamentary seat in 1847. The offer of the post of Ambassador to the new kingdom of Greece by the Foreign Secretary Lord Palmerston saved him from falling into obscurity. The offer may have been engineered by Letitia who had influence with Palmerston, at a particularly opportune time for France. Two years later Palmerston instantly recognized Letitia's cousin Louis Napoleon as Emperor of France, causing a serious crisis between Palmerston and the Queen and Prince Albert.

Thomas's efforts in securing Greek neutrality during the Crimean War 1854-56 saw him honoured with a knighthood in 1856. On his death in 1862 he was given a state funeral by the King and Queen of Greece.

Of Letitia's five children Thomas disclaimed paternity of all but the first two, even arranging a meeting with Emperor Louis Napoleon to try to prevent Letitia from citing Thomas as father. The Emperor declared that he found it easier to rule France than his family. He paid £15,000 debts for Letitia and continued her pension only on condition that she had no further claims on her husband's family. Neither Emperor nor Thomas could afford to have the family scandals aired in public."

He is buried in the  Attiki Prefecture, Athens, Greece--wonder if his great-niece by marriage ever wandered by?

 Wyse was the subject of a biography written by James Auchmuty, Sir Thomas Wyse, 1791-1862: the life and career of an educator and diplomat.

Thomas Wyse:



« Last Edit: March 16, 2010, 03:16:59 PM by grandduchessella »
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Bonaparte-Wyse family
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2010, 02:50:22 PM »
Napoleon Alfred, the eldest son known as 'Nappo', "largely brought up in Waterford by his Wyse aunt, undoubtedly suffered from the friction between his parents and in fact showed mental instability from an early age. Disinherited along with his brother by their father, to prevent any Bonaparte claim whatsoever, he later bought the Manor when it was being sold under the Encumbered Estates Act, became a Justice of the Peace, Deputy Lieutenant and High Sheriff of County Waterford like his ancestor in 1539. In 1862 following the death of Thomas, the Waterford News reported that Mr. N. B. Wyse, J.P. & his mother (Letitia) have taken up residence in the family mansion of Roanmore. Over the entrance door the Imperial Eagle has been very elegantly cut in stone by Mr. M. Carew sculptor of this city. The improvements to the Manor were extravagant, Napoleon Alfred sold up and died in Paris."

 William Charles Bonaparte-Wyse (1826–1892), son of Thomas Wyse and Laetitia, a student of the dialect of Provence. "The second son William Charles made a reputation for himself as a Provencal poet and as leader of the revival of the Provencal language, married and had four sons. He bought the Manor from his brother rather than see it leave the Wyse family. His Unionist sympathies at a time of unrest and Land League activity quickly involved him in broils with the Church and with Nationalists. He died in Cannes and is buried there."

Other info: " William Charles Bonaparte-Wyse was born in Waterford as the son of Thomas Wyse (09/12/1791-15/04/1862) and Laetitia Christine Bonaparte (01/12/1804-15/03/1871). Laetitia was a daughter of Lucien Bonaparte brother of Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte and Alexandrine de Bleschamps. William Bonaparte was a poet who wrote in Provençal and became a member of the Félibrige consistory (Provençal cultural association). He was a friend of Frédéric Mistral. " He's buried at Cimetière du Grand Jas de Cannes.


Lucien Bonaparte-Wyse "Bonaparte-Wyse is a name now synonymous with Irish Entymology and he was the subject of a recent profile by Professor Bryan P.Beirne, Professor Emeritus of the Simon Fraser University, B.C., Canada in his Review of Irish Entymology - The First Hundred Years.

Lucien was the great-grandson of Napoleon's brother, Lucien, and he was born in the late 1890's in Waterford, where he collected insects (mostly butterflies and beetles). He concentrated his collecting activities on the area adjacent to to his ancestral home at Manor of St.John, namely Roanmore and Kilbarry Bogs. With his early mentor, Canon Flemyng, he also roamed to Curraghmore and Tramore. He lived abroad until 1948 but he made frequent collecting trips to Ireland between 1906 and 1923. He also travelled extensively throughout Europe and Ceylon (Sri Lanka) with his mother, Ellen Linge Prout - a Russian Countess. His father, William Charles Bonaparte, was a noted Provencal poet, amongst other things. Lucien had only a small annuity after his mother died and this diminished in time. He returned to Waterford in 1948 and lived at Manor of St.John.
    
Beirne describes him as a memorable character of Irish entymology and as a lifetime dilletante. Wyse did much of his collecting in Ireland between 1912 and 1923, perhaps the most turbulent years in Irish history. Some of his companions thought that his fieldwork was only a cloak for some sort of political espionage because during this time of civil disturbance, revolution and civil war, most Irish collectors stayed at home and foreign ones stayed away.
    
Wyse had an odd personality, he was difficult to converse with and he was almost totally humourless. In stature he fitted the stereotype of a Waterford city man in that he was short. He was also very pallid in complexion and he had a distinctively Bonapartist appearance - said to be more natural than contrived. It was also said of him that he always gave the impression of wanting to be liked but that he never knew how to go about it.

Whatever view is taken of Wyse as a man, his worth as an entymologist is not in question. He produced over thirty papers that were published in the natural history journals of the day, many in association with other fieldworkers. One example is A Fortnight's Entymology in Co.Waterford published in 1923 and in which he published details of fifty-five species of beetle, most of which were new to Waterford and two of which had never before been recorded in Ireland. Many of these still stand as Irish records and some remain as the only records of the species in Waterford. It is difficult, today, to realise the impact that such works made on the world of natural science. The optical aids and field-guides that we enjoy today either did not exist or were utterly inadequate, yet he correctly identified obscure species to the satisfaction of the natural history hierarchy. Hunting insects is generally viewed as a distinctly eccentric activity, even today, so there is little doubt that he was viewed by the people of Roanmore and those he met on the Kilbarry Bogs as a bit of a crank and as an oddball.

Lucien Bonaparte-Wyse did things that were never done before and found out things about Ireland and Waterford that were unknown before his time.  He has received national recognition for his contribution to Irish entymology."  (Waterford Today Feb 2001)

From him was descended Colonel Wyse, U.S. Army, whose daughter is now the wife of Admiral Benson, Chief of Operations, U. S. Navy, The American Wyses also use the same arms as the Wises of Devon, but surmounted with the French Imperial Crest.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2010, 03:10:14 PM by grandduchessella »
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Bonaparte-Wyse family
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2010, 03:00:01 PM »
Link to the Bonaparte-Wyse papers:

http://www.nli.ie/pdfs/mss%20lists/bonaparte-wyse.pdf

More about Marie Laetitia:

The frontiers of popular exoticism: Marie Bonaparte's New Orleans crossings.(race and exile in the works of Marie Bonaparte)(Critical Essay) Nineteenth Century French Studies - Volume 31, Number 3&4, Spring-Summer 2003, pp. 311-323

"In stories and novels designed primarily for female consumption and published throughout the second half of the nineteenth century, popular novelists played an essential role in transforming the female traveler into a heroic model of cosmopolitanism for Second Empire female readers and travelers. In contrast to the canonical literature of Nerval, Gautier, and Flaubert, the highly charged exotic fiction of popular novelists remains little understood. Female authors such as Anais Segalas, the Countess Dash, and Raoul de Navery made significant contributions to the genre, publishing their works with Hachette and in reviews like the Revue des deux mondes. The most prolific writer of the popular exotic, Marie Bonaparte-Wyse, turns her exotic gaze to Reconstruction New Orleans as a cultural crossroads for female settler, traveler and slave. At this key moment of rebuilding post-Civil War US and modern France, Bonaparte-Wyse's short story "Maxime: recit des moeurs creoles" (1874) and book-length travel account, Les Americaines chez elles (1895) dwell on similarities between the man of color's lack of freedom and the colonial woman's social retreat. My comparison of these two texts written more than twenty years apart will shed light on the unique contribution of this prolific and outspoken femme de lettres and voyageuse to contemporary notions of race and foreignness. (1)

Bonaparte-Wyse's impressive role in fueling female readers' emerging taste for travel must be measured initially through the correspondence of the journalist and Swiss nomade, Isabelle Eberhardt, who sought out Bonaparte-Wyse's literary and financial support on the advice of their mutual friend, Lydia Pachkov (Charles-Roux 238). Pachkov, an orientalist then living in Paris who had published her own travel accounts of North Africa and the Middle East in the 1870s, sent letters of introduction for Eberhardt to such prominent intellectual and political figures as the editor Georges Calmann-Levy and Charles Maunoir, the President of the Paris Geographical Society. In a letter written to Eberhardt on March 18, 1890, Pachkov sets forth the etiquette expected of the nineteenth-century voyageuse, recommending that Eberhardt join the Paris Geographical Society and dine at the Petite Vache 60, rue Mazarine, amongst the most renowned explorers and politicians of her time, where she must dress in elegant orientalist fashion: "Il faut trouver le moyen de vous presenter sans qu'on vous prenne pour une aventuriere. Je vous y aiderai" (Charles-Roux 214; quoted in Doyon xxxi). (2)

Nearly ten years later, Pachkov suggested that Eberhardt meet a most gracious cousin of Napoleon III--"une vieille momie couverte de diamants et vetue de dentelles. Elle a bien pres de quatre-vingts ans. Bref, sa maison est curieuse et quelquefois utile, si l'on sait y trouver des relations. Votre premiere visite, faites-la en europeen. N'allez chez elle en costume arabe qu'en soiree et en la prevenant que vous avez cette habitude" (Charles-Roux 238; Doyon xviii). (3) The vieille fille for whom Eberhardt likely adopted European dress, in place of her usual Algerian bedouin garb, was none other than Marie Bonaparte-Wyse, in full repossession of the name Louis-Napoleon legally denied her. Having previously obtained funding from the princess herself, Pachkov felt confident Eberhardt would extend the same favor for Eberhardt. (4) There exists no proof that Eberhardt actually visited Bonaparte-Wyse; this documentation of their relationship suggests nonetheless that this Second Empire writer and traveler stood as a fin-de-siecle figure of authority and respectability in an era of few women explorers.

With three different husbands, four nationalities, and eight pennames, (5) Marie Bonaparte-Wyse rarely sought approval from either family or state. Born Studholmina Hodgson in England in 1831 to Laetitia Bonaparte-Wyse (the daughter of Lucien Bonaparte and niece of Napoleon Bonaparte), Studholmina-Marie Bonaparte-Wyse was the illegitimate daughter of Laetitia and Captain Studholm John Hodgson, born after Laetitia left her husband Thomas Wyse in 1828. Older brothers William and Louis were cosmopolites deeply invested in French political and cultural life; whereas William shaped the emerging Provencal literary movement through his poetry and criticism, engineer Lucien headed scientific missions to Central America, and won the Paris Geographical Society's prestigious Medaille d'or in 1876. (6)

Marie Bonaparte-Wyse led a remarkable life of adventure even for a woman of her class and wealth. First married at age sixteen, she held salons in Paris that were frequented by such figures as Nerval, Sand, Hugo and Dumas Pere. An enemy of the state until 1865, "Princesse Brouhaha," as novelist Alphonse Karr named her, was expelled from France in 1852 by order of the Minister of Police for being a "foreigner" (Olga Bonaparte-Wyse 127). (7) After much resistance, she moved outside France to Aix-les-Bains in Savoy, Piedmont and established a haven for French intellectuals in exile such as Victor Hugo, Jules Michelet and Eugene Sue at the Chalet de Solms on Lac du Bourget. Living periodically in Italy, France and the US, Bonaparte-Wyse spent a large part of the Second Empire and Third Republic writing stories, essays and literary reviews either published in her own political and literary journal, La Nouvelle Revue Internationale, or the Revue des Deux Mondes. … " (courtesy of Borders)

This article was written based on some source material by a descendant and gives her a different name than the wikipedia article. Here it is stated quite frankly that her birth name was Studholmina-Marie Bonaparte-Wyse and that she was the illegitimate daughter of Laetitia and Captain Studholm John Hodgson.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2010, 03:03:55 PM by grandduchessella »
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Bonaparte-Wyse family
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2010, 03:18:12 PM »
Laetitia Marie Wyse Bonaparte (I've always seen it Bonaparte Wyse elsewhere but that could be because she apparently wasn't a Wyse but the illegimate child of her mother, also Laetitia and an Irish Captain) (via Wikipedia) In 1840, aged seventeen, Marie married Frédéric de Solms, a rich gentleman from Strasbourg who soon left her to go to America. Marie, known as the Princess de Solms, remained with her mother, who kept a brilliant salon in Paris frequented by Victor Hugo, Eugene Sue, the younger Alexandre Dumas, and other writers. In the early 1850s Marie had an affair with Count Alexis de Pommereu that produced a son in 1852. In February 1853 the French authorities ordered her expulsion from the Empire, after accusations that she had illegally taken the name Bonaparte and had stirred up "scandalous disorders." There were however reports that the Emperor Napoleon III had secretly paid a number of visits to his beautiful young cousin, that the jealous Empress Eugenie had learned of the visits and told her husband that Marie maintained a salon of subversives, and that he had thereafter ordered her expulsion.

In August 1853 Marie settled at Aix-les-Bains in Savoy, then a part of the Kingdom of Sardinia, where her friend Pommereu built her a chalet that soon became the center of a new literary salon. She went often to Turin, capital of the kingdom, where she established yet another salon at the Hotel Feder. She maintained friendships with Hugo, Sue, Dumas, and others including Lajos Kossuth, Alphonse de Lamartine, Hughes Felicité Robert de Lamennais, Victor Henri Rochefort, Marquis de Rochefort-LuCay, Tony Revillon, and the American minister to the Kingdom of Sardinia, John Moncure Daniel. In 1859 Napoleon III's profligate cousin, Prince Napoleon, was betrothed to Clotilde, the 15-year-old daughter of King Vittorio Emanuele II. This was done as part of an agreement concluded by the King's prime minister, Count Cavour, to guarantee French support for Sardinia in the oncoming war to free northern Italy from Austrian occupation. Turin society was scandalized when the Princess de Solms flaunted the Emperor by appearing at the betrothal ball on the arm of U.S. Minister Daniel. The King, unhappy with the betrothal, was secretly pleased.

Through Sainte Beuve, Marie contributed to the Constitutionnel under the pen name of Baron Stock. After Savoy was annexed to France (1860) as another part of the agreement between Napoleon III and Cavour, Marie went back to Paris where she played a prominent part in the literary and social events of the time. In 1863, her husband having died, she married Italian statesman Urbano Rattazzi, and lived with him in Italy. After he died, she returned to Paris, and a few years later married Señor de Rute, a Spaniard whom she also outlived. Her writings consists of miscellaneous sketches, verses, plays, and novels, such as Si j'etais reine (1868) and Les marriages de la créole (1866), reprinted under the title La chanteuse (1870). Her 1867 novel "Bicheville," a thinly disguised attack on the society of Florence, capital of the new Kingdom of Italy, caused serious embarrassment to Rattazzi, who was serving as prime minister of the Kingdom.

I also found this--married: First, Prince de Salms: second, Urbain Rattazzi, the Italian statesman: and, third, Senor de Tuto, a Spaniard. Frederick Harrison, in his delightful memoirs, refers to her as a "most remarkable woman,". The 'Salms' could be being confused with Solms .

Also, Frederic Engels wrote to Karl Marx from Manchester, 17 February 1863 "Revelations about the court in Paris are again becoming quite the rage and, in the Guardian, Mr Tom Taylor is portentously dishing up all that stuff re la Solms, Bonaparte, Wyse, the Jecker affair, etc., that we've long known far more about. There’s only one thing of interest, namely that Jecker had already supplied money for the Strasbourg or the Boulogne conspiracy — which, Taylor doesn’t know. This, then, accounts for the connection." Don't know anything more about that tidbit.
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Bonaparte-Wyse family
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2010, 05:14:51 PM »
Laetitia



Laetitia's 5 children

Napoleon Alfred Bonaparte-Wyse * 06.01.1822

William Charles Bonaparte-Wyse * 20.02.1826 m  Ellen Linzee Prout



Lucien Bonaparte-Wyse * 1844  m (1)  Rosa White  (2) Clara White

Marie-Letitia Bonaparte-Wyse * 25.04.1831 m (1)  Friedrich Joseph zu Solms

 (2) Urbano Pio Francesco Rattazzi  



(3)  Luis de Rute y Gruer

by Carolus-Duran at the musée des Beaux-Arts



Adeline Bonaparte-Wyse * 1838  Stephan Türr

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Offline Seth Leonard

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Re: Bonaparte-Wyse family
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2010, 07:22:23 PM »
There is also a book about the family written by one of its members:

The Spurious Brood: Princess Letitia Bonaparte and Her Children by Olga Bonaparte-Wyse

Offline britt.25

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Re: Bonaparte-Wyse family
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2010, 03:24:51 PM »
Yes, that's right. I have just bought this book, but didn't have the time to read it until now.

There are also some beautiful rare pics in this book.

Great topic, thank you !!!!
La vérité est plus importante que l'amour

     Marie Bonaparte (1882-1962)