Author Topic: New Julia Gelardi Book: In Triumph's Wake: Royal Mothers, Tragic Daughters  (Read 6351 times)

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Offline Marie Valerie

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In Triumph's Wake: Royal Mothers, Tragic Daughters--The Price They Paid for Glory

It sounds very interesting, anyone knows more about this book?

Lalee

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All I know is that it should be released in late November. Does anyone else know more?

Offline grandduchessella

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There was an alternate title at one point that said something like 'Three Royal Matriarchs, Three Tragic Daughters'. I didn't say who the mother/daughter combinations are/were though or even what time period.
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Offline Ena

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I loved Born to Rule, so I'll definitely be on lookout for this one.

Offline Marie Valerie

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Re: New Julia Gelardi Book: In Triumph's Wake: Royal Mothers, Tragic Daughters
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2008, 10:05:20 AM »
The powerful and moving story of three royal mothers whose quest for power led to the downfall of their daughters.

 

Queen Isabella of Castile, Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, and Queen Victoria of England were respected and admired rulers whose legacies continue to be felt today.  Their daughters—Catherine of Aragon, Queen of England; Queen Marie Antoinette of France; and Vicky, the Empress Frederick of Germany—are equally legendary for the tragedies that befell them, their roles in history surpassed by their triumphant mothers.  In Triumph's Wake is the first book to bring together the poignant stories of these mothers and daughters in a single narrative.

Isabella of Castile forged a united Spain and presided over the discovery of the New World, Maria Theresa defeated her male rivals to claim the Imperial Crown, and Victoria presided over the British Empire. But, because of their ambition and political machinations, each mother pushed her daughter toward a marital alliance that resulted in disaster. Catherine of Aragon was cruelly abandoned by Henry VIII who cast her aside in search of a male heir and tore England away from the Pope. Marie Antoinette lost her head on the guillotine when France exploded into Revolution and the Reign of Terror. Vicky died grief-stricken, horrified at her inability to prevent her son, Kaiser Wilhelm, from setting Germany on a belligerent trajectory that eventually led to war. 

Exhaustively researched and utterly compelling, In Triumph's Wake is the story of three unusually strong women and the devastating consequences their decisions had on the lives of their equally extraordinary daughters.

Offline Marie Valerie

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Re: New Julia Gelardi Book: In Triumph's Wake: Royal Mothers, Tragic Daughters
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2008, 10:08:38 AM »

Offline imperial angel

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Anyone read this book? I have. It covers Queen Victoria and Vicky, but if you have already read Hannah Pakula's book on Vicky, you might not learn much, otherwise, it's worth reading this part because the Pakula book in my opinion can be long and tiresome whereas this book's part on Vicky is shorter and yet has much good info. I did enjoy reading about what she says about MA and Maria Theresa in here and about Isabella of Castile and Catharine of Aragon, Isabella of Castile and Maria Theresa haven't been covered as much as their daughters in bios in English anyway so reading about them was interesting. Maria Theresa certainly attempted to warn MA in her letters many times of the consequences MA's frivolousness could have (when she first came to France) is the impression you get from this book.

Alixz

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Re: New Julia Gelardi Book: In Triumph's Wake: Royal Mothers, Tragic Daughters
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2011, 02:04:09 PM »
I just decided to order this book yesterday.

I like Gelardi's style and I hope I will like this.

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: New Julia Gelardi Book: In Triumph's Wake: Royal Mothers, Tragic Daughters
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2011, 04:48:40 PM »
I bought it for our library (along with Born to Rule and Splendor to Revolution) but only looked at the parts (so far at least) dealing with Queen Victoria and Vicky. I agree with IA that there's not much new there. I think what kept me from getting drawn into this book as much as BTR and now STR is the fact of the time jumps. These women didn't have any interaction with each other, save for the pairs of mothers and daughters. It thus lacked the epic sprawl that the other books have. Still, I love the fact that she keeps getting books on royal women published so more power to her!
« Last Edit: February 16, 2011, 08:31:21 PM by grandduchessella »
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Alixz

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Re: New Julia Gelardi Book: In Triumph's Wake: Royal Mothers, Tragic Daughters
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2011, 09:58:00 AM »
Although these three pairs didn't have any interaction with each other, Maria Teresa was a lateral descendant of Queen Isabella.  I guess that would mean that many times removed Marie Antoinette was also related to Queen Isabella.

This also explains the reason that there was an Austrian and Spanish branch to the Hapsburgs.  Had Marie Antoinette's children lived to rule, then the Hapsburgs would have been represented in France, too.

Like all royal families including Queen Victoria's in a later century, the children were intermarried and they all ended up related in some way.

I am through Isabella and Catherine and am now in the middle of Maria Teresa and Marie Antoinette.  So far, although slow moving in some spots in the mothers' lives, the book is good.

I thought I knew a lot about Catherine of Aragon, but I found out that, although the basic facts were there, Ms. Gelardi has fleshed out the characters and made them more human and easier to relate to.


Alixz

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I finished the book last night.  I noticed that some very important things were left out of the biographies (important to me, anyway).

Like Louis XVI needed surgery to be able to consummate his marriage and father children.  Ms. Gelardi tells how Marie Antoinette was blamed for being barren, but doesn't explain how the problem was fixed.

I agree with the poster who said that Hannah Pakula's biography of Vicky (The Empress Frederick) was much more thorough and since I had already read that, the chapters on Queen Victoria and Vicky were sort of one dimensional.

I did like, though, that Ms. Gelardi used information from King Edward VIII about his great grandmother, Queen Victoria.

All in all it is a book worth reading.  I don't know if it is worth buying.  Maybe a library loan book.