Author Topic: Empress Elisabeth, Part I  (Read 366482 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Silja

  • Guest
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #45 on: January 05, 2005, 04:06:32 PM »
Here's another interesting link

http://www.gau.hu/godollo/welcome.html

Offline Martyn

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 7022
  • Martyn's Chips
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #46 on: January 05, 2005, 06:19:37 PM »
Now you are spoiling me!
'For a galant spirit there can never be defeat'....Wallis Windsor

'The important things is not what they think of me, but what I think of them.'......QV

Offline Martyn

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 7022
  • Martyn's Chips
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #47 on: January 13, 2005, 09:54:12 AM »
Thanks Gleb
Thank you for that information I seem to recall that part about them living at the Palazzo Farnese.  I shall try to find out more about her......
'For a galant spirit there can never be defeat'....Wallis Windsor

'The important things is not what they think of me, but what I think of them.'......QV

Offline gleb

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 812
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #48 on: January 13, 2005, 01:46:16 PM »
I haven't finished yet....

As many konw the Royal marriage hadn't been consumated yet. The whole court knew about this
(Re Francesco II suffered from a relatively common male disease the phimosis, which is easily
to correct in a surgical way, but he did not want).
Anyway Maria understood she was pregnant and so told her husband she had to leave for Bayern
in order to visit her parents and  have a rest.

Offline gleb

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 812
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #49 on: January 13, 2005, 01:48:20 PM »
she spent many times in Bayern and gave birth to a child in Augsburg 1862
(the child was given to the real father).
After this she came back to Rome, told everything to the King, who forgave her even becouse
he was partially guilty. He was operated and in 1869 she gave birth to another child a female one,
bur she died early.....
In 1870 Rome became part of the Sabaudo Regno and even if King Vittorio Emanuele gave them the
permission to live there, they leaved and went to live in Paris, and in Bayern and started
spending long far from themselves.....

Offline brnbg aka: liljones1968

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 775
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #50 on: January 13, 2005, 07:48:09 PM »
Quote
As many konw the Royal marriage hadn't been consumated yet. The whole court knew about this (Re Francesco II suffered from a relatively common male disease the phimosis...)



that wasn't the only reason, was it?  <wink-wink, nudge-nudge>

(i mean, he was a homosexual, wasn't he?)
"when i die, i hope i go like my grandfather --
peacefully in my sleep; not screaming & in terror,
like the passengers in his car."

-- anonymous
.

Offline gleb

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 812
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #51 on: January 14, 2005, 03:29:30 AM »
Hi Brian,

In Italy we call Maria the two ways (Regina di Napoli and Regina del Regno delle Due Sicilie).
They are both exact. Becouse The Bourbons of Naples were Kings of Naples, and of Sicily. For example King Ferdinando (the one who married the daughter of Empress Maria Theresa von Habsburg) was Ferdinando IV of Naples and Ferdinando III of Sicily.
But after 1816 He became simply Ferdinando I delle Due (two) Sicilie. I am italian, but do not ask me why they said two Sicilies, even if, as you all know, Sicily is one island...

Offline gleb

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 812
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #52 on: January 14, 2005, 03:31:01 AM »
It is all a bit too complicated but sounds very Italian...

Offline gleb

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 812
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #53 on: January 14, 2005, 03:34:05 AM »
As far as I konw King Francesco (also called Franceschiello = little Francesco) was not homosexual, but anyway it is, at least, strange that he liked spending his nights reading the Holy Bible.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by gleb »

Offline Martyn

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 7022
  • Martyn's Chips
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #54 on: January 14, 2005, 05:13:37 AM »
Great pictures Brian, as usual.  Those Wittelsbach sisters were beautiful.  It would seem that they both had a penchant for black velvet and riding habits (aren't they referred to as being 'en Amazone'?)
I can't remember what the exact deal was with her husband; I do recall though that, when the occasion demanded, she displayed great courage and strength of purpose.  Phimosis, apparently, was the obstacle that had prevented Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette form consummating their marriage in the early days.....
It would be great to know a little more of their life in exile
'For a galant spirit there can never be defeat'....Wallis Windsor

'The important things is not what they think of me, but what I think of them.'......QV

Offline Lisa

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1464
  • Alix & Ella
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #55 on: January 16, 2005, 08:45:19 AM »
Alix and Sissi in 1896 when the tsar and tsaritsa visited Austria(I know its quite small, but it's an historical document! ;))




Offline Lisa

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1464
  • Alix & Ella
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #56 on: January 16, 2005, 08:50:16 AM »
1869 by Székely (bertan)


1899 by LASZLO


1860's by Eduard KAISER

Agneschen

  • Guest
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #57 on: January 16, 2005, 09:21:02 AM »
Marie was nicknamed "Heroin of Gaeta" because of her courageous behaviour during the siege of the Gaeta fortress where she and her husband had fled after their neapolitan throne had been overthrown by Garibaldi's troops. The young queen became the soul of the resistance to the enemy, encouraging her husband's soldiers during the battle and nursing the wounded men under bullets and bombs. When the opposing forces asked her for the location of her home in Gaeta so as not to drop bombs on it she staunchly refused to give it. However Gaeta was lost and the now ex-royal couple took refuge in Rome where Marie had a love affair with a young belgian count, Armand de Lawayss. She secretely gave birth to an illegitimate daughter by Armand, called Daisy, in the Ursulines Convent in Augsburg in 1862. Her daughter by King Francesco, Cristina-Pia, died in Rome, aged only 3 or 4 months. For all I know, King Francesco was not homosexual, only a shy and extremely religious man, totally inhibited. He suffered from a phimosis which prevented sexual relationships.
Marie and Francesco's first years of marriage had been somewhat unhappy but later they reached some kind of understanding. They often visited her bavarian relatives in Germany but mostly lived in France (Paris & nearby Saint Mandé) and England where the young queen loved to hunt. It is actually she who invited her sister Elisabeth to join in and the empress so enjoyed herself that she made several others trips to England during the following years (much to Kaiser Franz Josef's distress and to the Vienna population's anger). However on one of these occasion Marie behaved unfairly toward her elder sister, spreading rumours about a love affair between the empress and Bay Middleton, en english horseman. She even told Kronprinz Rudolf, Sisi's son, about it which caused a row and estranged the 2 women.
Marie never forgave the House of Savoy for "stealing" her throne and is said to have plotted against them. She strongly opposed the projected marriage between her grand-niece princess Marie-José of Belgium and the heir to the italian throne Umberto, telling the young girl that if she married him, she would bitterly regret it and never be happy.
She spent her last years with her sister Mathilde in Munich where she died in 1925.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Agneschen »

Offline gleb

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 812
    • View Profile
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #58 on: January 17, 2005, 08:16:59 AM »
Maybe it is already known but I suggest a book by Erika Bestenreiner "Sisi und ihre geschwister". It is a book about Sissi, but has a chapter also on all the brothers and sisters (or even more then one if they are more interesting).
I think this book has been translated even in english, surely in french.

Silja

  • Guest
Re: Empress Elisabeth, Part I
« Reply #59 on: January 17, 2005, 11:39:07 AM »
I was quite disappointed with Sisi und ihre Geschwister. It doesn't contain anything new and  gives only brief biographies of some of Sisi's brothers and sisters. It may be a good introduction for someone entirely new to the subject, but for those more familiar with it it is simply trite. I didn't like the author's style either.

Bestenreiner's new book on Franz Ferdinand and Sophie Chotek has recently come out in Germany but after the disappointment with the former I don't care to get this one.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Silja »