Author Topic: Anastasia - A Haemophilia Carrier?  (Read 38833 times)

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Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Anastasia - A Haemophilia Carrier?
« Reply #45 on: October 03, 2011, 09:16:05 AM »
Statistically, it would have been surprising for none of the daughters to be a carrier (and equally surprising for them all to be carriers).

The 50/50 chance of each child of a carrier having the haemophilia gene works quite well when applied to Victoria's descendants.

Victoria herself had nine children, of whom one of her four sons and two of her five daughters had the gene. That is three out of nine, which is on the low side, but Princess Louise's position is unknown because she never had children.

Victoria's daughter Alice of Hesse had two sons, one of whom was a haemophiliac, and five daughters, two of whom were definitely carriers. Ella weas childless and Marie died in infancy, so, again, their position is unknown. There have been recent suggestions that haemophilia has appeared in the descendants of VMH's daughter Alice, but nothing definite on that point. VMH's two sons were healthy and her other daughter was childless.

Alexandra's sister Irene had three sons, two of whom were haemophiliac.

Princess Beatrice had three sons, one of whom was a haemophiliac, and one daughter, who was a carrier (and produced two haemophiliac sons out of four).

Alice of Athlone, daughter of Leopold of Albany, had two sons, one of whom was definitely haemophiliac and the other may have been (he died at six months). Her daughter was not a carrier.

Ann


Lady-in-Waiting

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Re: Anastasia - A Haemophilia Carrier?
« Reply #46 on: October 17, 2011, 05:51:33 PM »
DNA tests have shown that one of the thee daughters found in the first grave was a carrier of type B hemophilia. I don't know if they have specified which number skeleton is the carrier.

Greetings from a long-time lurker!

I looked up Dr Evgeny Rogaev's article published in Science magazine on November 6, 2009. Only one of the four daughters carried the genetic mutation causing haemophila B, and that was skeleton #6. In 1992, that skeleton was identified by Russian forensic specialists as Anastasia; the American forensic team led by William Maples identified her as Tatiana.


Olga Bernice

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Re: Anastasia - A Haemophilia Carrier?
« Reply #47 on: October 17, 2011, 06:15:50 PM »
DNA tests have shown that one of the thee daughters found in the first grave was a carrier of type B hemophilia. I don't know if they have specified which number skeleton is the carrier.

Greetings from a long-time lurker!

I looked up Dr Evgeny Rogaev's article published in Science magazine on November 6, 2009. Only one of the four daughters carried the genetic mutation causing haemophila B, and that was skeleton #6. In 1992, that skeleton was identified by Russian forensic specialists as Anastasia; the American forensic team led by William Maples identified her as Tatiana.


  Greetings to YOU!  Nice to have you "out in the open" !  Much more exciting than "lurking" !  Regards,   AP

Agreed!

Anyway, did Tatiana ever have any symtoms or hemhorages (sic?) during her lifetime? I know Maria did, but . . .

Lady-in-Waiting

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Re: Anastasia - A Haemophilia Carrier?
« Reply #48 on: October 17, 2011, 06:40:41 PM »
Thank you both for the welcome! It's nice to slip out of the shadows for a while. : )

I too have never heard of any bleeding problems for any of the Grand Duchesses except Maria. So perhaps the carrier was asymptomatic.