Author Topic: "Rasputin: the memories of a daughter" by Matrena Rasputina (in Russian)  (Read 10113 times)

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Offline Helen_Azar

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Re: "Rasputin: the memories of a daughter" by Matrena Rasputina (in Russian)
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2011, 01:52:57 PM »
lol mr pot, met miss kettle .

Funny.

I don't think Radzinsky is quite that bad, though. IMO, many of the personal impressions he's formed about the IF through his research have merit. After all, he's had a lot more access to the materials in GARF than most of the authors we tend to take more seriously. That said, I do wish he'd do his readers the courtesy of differentiating between what is fact and what is intuition.
He is not that bad, he is just a little too whimsical, for the lack of a better term, and tend to get overly dramatic (that's because he was originally a playwright), but I think that he does base his writings on actual archival material... He just presents in a way that's different from a "regular" historian so it comes off a little weird... I kind of like him though. 

Offline Helen_Azar

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Re: "Rasputin: the memories of a daughter" by Matrena Rasputina (in Russian)
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2011, 01:54:42 PM »
I am interested in this book not necessarily for its historical value, but more to see Matrena's perception and retelling of her own story... seen from her point of view so to speak. In that sense, it's interesting. Plus this is also the book that has the recipe of the Grand Duchesses' ice cream recipe!  :D

Offline nena

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Re: "Rasputin: the memories of a daughter" by Matrena Rasputina (in Russian)
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2011, 02:56:25 PM »
I think that Russian version of Rasputin's daughter is: Matyorna. ;-)
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Offline Sarushka

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Re: "Rasputin: the memories of a daughter" by Matrena Rasputina (in Russian)
« Reply #18 on: August 12, 2011, 03:49:06 PM »
I am interested in this book not necessarily for its historical value, but more to see Matrena's perception and retelling of her own story... seen from her point of view so to speak. In that sense, it's interesting. Plus this is also the book that has the recipe of the Grand Duchesses' ice cream recipe!  :D

Does the Russian version have the ice cream recipe? If so, I would guess it's the same as the 1977 English memoir.
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Offline rudy3

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Re: "Rasputin: the memories of a daughter" by Matrena Rasputina (in Russian)
« Reply #19 on: August 13, 2011, 12:20:38 AM »
I think that Russian version of Rasputin's daughter is: Matyorna. ;-)

In Russian: Matryona (wriiten Matrëna, "ë" standing for "yo")

Offline rudy3

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Re: "Rasputin: the memories of a daughter" by Matrena Rasputina (in Russian)
« Reply #20 on: August 13, 2011, 01:43:16 AM »
I am interested in this book not necessarily for its historical value, but more to see Matrena's perception and retelling of her own story... seen from her point of view so to speak. In that sense, it's interesting. Plus this is also the book that has the recipe of the Grand Duchesses' ice cream recipe!  :D

Does the Russian version have the ice cream recipe? If so, I would guess it's the same as the 1977 English memoir.

In Chapter 19, called "Dinner at the Palace" (At the Alexander Palace)

page 204 paragraph: The Emperor's Icecream

on pages 205/206 the recipe of "Icecream "Romanov"

 

Offline nena

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Re: "Rasputin: the memories of a daughter" by Matrena Rasputina (in Russian)
« Reply #21 on: August 13, 2011, 07:17:37 AM »
I think that Russian version of Rasputin's daughter is: Matyorna. ;-)

In Russian: Matryona (wriiten Matrëna, "ë" standing for "yo")
Thanks for clarification, I was speaking about the way it's pronounced. And yes, I misplaced two letters. Yes, Radzinsky's style of writing might not be a historian's one, but he surely has much richer and amazing information, and yes, closer access to the GARF. "Her memories were published in the West in the end of the 70's, where she stated :"my father never ate sweets, meat and the cakes", because of his special diet."(Radzinsky, E., "RASPUTIN FILE"). Well, I wanted to say that she indeed used to speak about food.
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Offline delincolon

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Re: "Rasputin: the memories of a daughter" by Matrena Rasputina (in Russian)
« Reply #22 on: August 13, 2011, 08:20:51 AM »
Yes, Matryona Rasputin wrote three books about her father.  Of course, they are the memories of a devoted daughter.  For a more rounded view of Rasputin, and the result of a dozen years of research, read my book, "Rasputin and The Jews: A Reversal of History".  As summarized on Amazon, "This book is a well-documented account of Rasputin as a healer, equal rights activist and man of God, and why he was so vilified by the aristocracy that their vicious rumors became accepted as history. For nearly a century, Grigory Rasputin, spiritual advisor to Russia's last Tsar and Tsarina, has been unjustly maligned simply because history is written by the politically powerful and not by the common man. A wealth of evidence shows that Rasputin was discredited by a fanatically anti-Semitic Russian society, for advocating equal rights for the severely oppressed Jewish population, as well as for promoting peace in a pro-war era. Testimony by his friends and enemies, from all social strata, provides a picture of a spiritual man who hated bigotry, inequity and violence." It has received great reader and editorial reviews, as well as status as an addition to both The Simon Wiesenthal Museum of Tolerance Library in Los Angeles and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York.