Author Topic: Victorian kitchen that has remained untouched for 60 years discovered Read mor  (Read 6219 times)

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Offline Clemence

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'' It used to be all girls without clothes. Now it’s all clothes with no girls. Pity.''

bonbon823

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SO very interesting!  I wish I could find something so cool...but alas, I live in a manufactured home!

Robert_Hall

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This wonderful to me, I am working on a miniature Victorian kitchen and the photos are a great help.  I do not think I can find an Aga of that type though.  It would cost too much to replicate. I already have a modern one [in miniature] but it does not quite fit in.  The pots & pans, the bottles and such, great resource.

Offline RealAnastasia

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What a little treasure! Thanks for posting it!

RealAnastasia.

Offline CountessKate

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This wonderful to me, I am working on a miniature Victorian kitchen and the photos are a great help.  I do not think I can find an Aga of that type though.  It would cost too much to replicate. I already have a modern one [in miniature] but it does not quite fit in.  The pots & pans, the bottles and such, great resource.

Perhaps you are looking for the wrong thing?  There are lots of miniature kitchen ranges and many of them are not expensive - the aga was invented in 1929 and is a relatively modern appliance and in miniature terms might be quite pricey.  They wouldn't have had an aga in a Victorian kitchen - but of course it looks better in a headline.  As in the picture, Victorian kitchen ranges would have been placed within a fireplace so the smoke would be sent up the chimney, and I've seen some miniature Victorian ranges sold with the fireplace surround, all in one piece - they're not uncommon and can be reasonably priced. 

I volunteer in the National Trust Carlyle's House in Chelsea, where there is a splendid example of a kitchen range of about 1850 - it has an integral boiler, an open fire section and a closed oven bit - very high tech for the times but the thought of actually cooking on it is a nightmare.  Quite a few people however have commented that their grandmothers had had those sorts of devices when they were children - not all of them aged grannies themselves, either!

Robert_Hall

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Thank you, Countess Kate.  I have an artist/seller making a Victorian range for me that meets  your description, he in in Yorkshire I think.  It is a custom piece and costly but worth it.  I think I just meant the term "Aga " generectly We are dating my kitchen around 1905 or so, for a great country house.. This is just a room box.  The whole house is another story with a totally modern, updated kitchen.  It would sort of  be  like the one discovered in the basement here. I have been working on this project for years and in no rush to finish it.

Offline EmmyLee

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How interesting! I'm glad they'll be preserving it-- what a treasure to find in your own house!