Author Topic: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard  (Read 14506 times)

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Christian Eriksen

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Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« on: December 27, 2011, 06:35:16 AM »
Hi all
I hope somebody can help me: In Coryne Halls book 'Little Mother of Russia' it is stated that Nicky joined the Prebrajensky Guard in 1887 - does anyone know a more precise date??
KR Christian

DanielB

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2012, 04:32:05 PM »
He began his military service as  Second-Lieutenant in the 1st « His Majesty’s » Company on June 23, 1887 (Old Style) and was promoted to the rank of Staff-Captain on August 30. He remained on active duty in the Regiment for 2 years before joining units from the Guards’ Cavalry & Horse Artillery to complete his military training.

He remained on the rolls of the Preobrazhensky Guards and went back to active duty in the Regiment on January 1st, 1893 to take command of the 1st Battalion as a Colonel, the rank he had when he became emperor and which he kept for the rest of his life. In December 1894, Nicholas II established a « Badge for Service in the 1st Battalion of the Guards’ Preobrazhensky Regiment » (with the dates January 1, 1893-October 20, 1894), which was awarded to all officers & men who had served under his command.

As General Spiridovich recalls in his memoirs, in June 1912 the 25th anniversary of the beginning of Nicholas' service in the Regiment was celebrated at Peterhof. A parade was held and, to the Regimental Commanding Officer’s dismay, Nicholas II insisted to march in the parade at the head of « his » battalion, behind the C.O., which he did twice, giving a military salute to the Empresses when he marched by them.

After a luncheon with the officers of the Regiment, while holding the hand of young Tsarevich Alexis – who was wearing the uniform of the Regiment for the first time - he told them the day he had joined the ranks of the Regiment had been the happiest of his life and that he hoped he would live long enough to see the day his son would join the ranks of the Guards’ Preobrazhensky Regiment too. This day never came…
« Last Edit: March 11, 2012, 04:37:03 PM by Daniel Briere »

Offline Ausmanov

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2012, 05:40:13 PM »
i recently read a biography of Peter the Great with the origins of the preobrajensky regiment in it. Its foundation is fascinating. again my compliments to you daniel. Your the best in this field.
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DanielB

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2012, 11:34:59 PM »
Thanks mate!

It is quite interesting indeed to learn how a bunch of lads playing war games came to be the senior regiment of the Imperial Russian Army. A word about its regimental march in modern times : as Peter the Great was the only tsar viewed favourably by Soviet historians (for being a reformer and a modernizer) the Preobrazhensky regimental march was performed at concerts given by Soviet military orchestras and now is officially played by the Russian Army as a ceremonial march. Worth noting too that, thanks to Lord Mountbatten, it was adopted by the British Royal Marines as its slow march in 1964.

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2012, 04:37:57 AM »
The Royal Marines' rendition of the Preobrajensky March is the best. Non-British Forumeers should be able to find it on the web easily enough.

Ann

Sunny

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2012, 08:50:52 AM »
The Royal Marines' rendition of the Preobrajensky March is the best. Non-British Forumeers should be able to find it on the web easily enough.

Ann

I think it is the same march heard here (don't pay attention to the speaking, LOL)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyOphyIt_ho

I do not know much about russian army regiments, so i can't say whether the cadets in the movie are from Preobrajensky  but the music seems the same!

DanielB

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2012, 12:55:19 PM »
Sunny : you are right about the music: the 1st piece played, when Alexander III arrives on horseback, is part of the Preobrazhensky March. But the cadets have nothing to do with the regiment : they are from the Moscow Alexander Military School. The scene depicts a fictional scene of their graduation at the Kremlin in 1885 from the Russian film « The Barber of Siberia ».

Ann : I agree with you, The Royal Marines play it the old way, as it was before the Revolution. The Soviets, and most Russian bands play it faster, as it was in Peter the Great’s time apparently. Here’s a rendition of what it sounded like during the reign of Nicholas II:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94Cp-nZHCDc

Today it seems the March is used by the Russian Army during the Changing of the Guard, at least in St. Petersburg’s Peter and Paul Fortress a few meters only away from Peter the Great’s tomb. I’m sure it’s "music to his ears », and to Nicholas II’s too, although they probably wouldn’t like the new/old Soviet/Russian anthem much..:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Qu6gr06lUU&feature=related
« Last Edit: March 20, 2012, 01:11:42 PM by Daniel Briere »

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2012, 01:14:20 PM »
Here is a Royal Marines version, but unfortunately neither the video nor the sound quality are all that good.

Personal opinion, but I think it works best in slow time (60 paces to the minute rather than 120).

Ann

Sunny

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2012, 01:26:05 PM »

Personal opinion, but I think it works best in slow time (60 paces to the minute rather than 120).

I agree

Sunny : you are right about the music: the 1st piece played, when Alexander III arrives on horseback, is part of the Preobrazhensky March. But the cadets have nothing to do with the regiment : they are from the Moscow Alexander Military School. The scene depicts a fictional scene of their graduation at the Kremlin in 1885 from the Russian film « The Barber of Siberia »

Oh yes. I adore that scene. Of course is fictional but i find AIII and MF are wonderfully portrayed - AIII seems just jumped out of a painting, he's so real!
Sorry for OT, and thanks for explanation! I just watched that particular scene, so did not know who the cadets were.

Robert_Hall

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2012, 01:27:45 PM »
I think it may also be used at the Presidential Guards Parade at the Kremlin in Moscow. They are dressed in Alex. 1st uniforms.

Offline TimM

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2012, 04:53:38 PM »
How do you pronounce "Preobrajensky"?   Just curious.
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bestfriendsgirl

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2012, 07:47:43 PM »
IIRC, the Preobrajensky March is played in The Romanovs: An Imperial Family when Nicholas gets off the Imperial Train at Stavka.

Sunny

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2012, 01:56:55 AM »
How do you pronounce "Preobrajensky"?   Just curious.

I think in english it would sound something like PREEOBRAEENSKY
Both the first e and je should be pronounced as EE (if my russian is still good)

Offline TimM

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2012, 04:27:43 PM »
Wow, that is a mouthful :)
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Robert_Hall

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Re: Nicky in the Preobrajensky guard
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2012, 04:35:45 PM »
Try preo-bra-yen-ski. Tim.  Like many languages,  words tend to contract and sound shortened when spoken.