Author Topic: Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II  (Read 433304 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline edubs31

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1014
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #390 on: January 15, 2013, 07:15:53 PM »
The Tsar waves to acknowledge and the scene cuts away. We pick things back up two hours later, shortly before 6pm. Lily Dehn, Sophie Buxhoeveden, and Ana Vyrubova are assisting Olga Nikolaevna with the last of her clothing and the application of makeup. Nicholas knocks on the door and enters the room. The ladies clear away and turn Olga to face her father. Dressed in a pink ballgown, her thick blond hair is coiled for the first time in a womanly style atop her head...

Olga (doing a turn in her gown a smiling): Papa, do you like?
Nicholas (awe stuck): Olga...oh my daughter, you look...absolutely beautiful.
Olga: Thank you papa!

Just then Alexandra also enters the room, herself having finished dressing but moments earlier. The woman bow in succession to the Empress and exit the room leaving the imperial couple and their eldest daughter alone...

Alexandra: Oh my sweet Olga, how marvelous! You truly look like a lady.
Olga (blushing): Thank you dear mama...my first ball gown, but what do you think of my hair? I'm so very proud to be wearing it up. I feel like a lady just as you say!
Nicholas: A finer looking lady in all of Russia does not exist!
Olga (blushing again): I'm a bit uncertain about some of this jewelry. The ladies had many opinions on what would look best...mama can you help me decide?

Alexandra, smiling, turns to her husband and motions for him to walk over. Nicholas moves closely to his daughter and produces two boxes...one small piece from his right pocket and another larger box other from his breast pocket...

Nicholas: I believe this will make your decision a bit easier.

The Tsar opens each box to reveal a beautiful diamond ring and a precious necklace of thirty-two diamonds and pearls that he helps place on his daughter's finger and around her neck...

Olga (eyes moist and overcome with emotion): Oh papa, they are beautiful! I cannot believe this could all be for me. I love you both so very much.
Alexandra: And we love you! You were our first child, the most precious thing that had ever come into our lives. And now that you are a young lady you are the first to receive these gifts which symbolize your entrance into womanhood.
Nicholas (embracing Olga): Whatever I own and have to offer will belong to my children. You deserve the very best my darling child. Not only because you are the daughter of the Tsar...but becomes you are a magnificent young lady. Some day you will make your own family happy just as you have filled our world with sunshine.
Olga: Thank you, thank you. I couldn't be happier and more grateful!
Alexandra: The time for thanks and gratitude can come later my dear. Please, go, enjoy yourself. This is your birthday, your night!

Her parents embrace her warmly and the scene cuts away. Next scene shifts to just after 6pm. Nicholas, Alexandra and the Imperial children are shown greeting guests as they enter. Military cavaliers dressed in frock coat with epaulets and civilians in evening dress with white tie accompany ladies in gorgeous ballgowns laced with sparkling jewelry. The scene then shifts to Olga's formal introduction. Two large doors are opened from the side and the rear and the Tsar reenters the room locked arm in arm with his daughter. Everyone is shown standing at attention...

Nicholas: Ladies and gentleman good evening. Thank you for joining us at this most auspicious of occasions. My lovely eldest daughter Olga Nikolaevna turns sixteen today. Now her mother and I have already adorned her with gifts but we are saving the best for last. (motioning to the band leader) I present to you the Eighth regiment of the Elizavetgradsky Hussars!

The members of the regiment dressed in their blue and red uniforms with gold trim enter the room. They perform a military style maneuver in front of the audience and then Olga. Her eyes are moist and she is filled with great joy. The camera pans around the room showing the faces of smiling guests and Olga is then shown leaning over to kiss her father on the cheek. The Hussar regiment then bows and receives great applause from those in attendance. One officer then steps forward...

Officer: At present, your Imperial Highness, the traditional device of your regiment received its full sense...to preserve the name of Olga, the white pelisse and the standard.
Olga (surprised): This device already existed?
Officer (smiling): It existed and yet exists.

The officers bows to her highness and his majesty. He along with other officers line up to bow, kiss the hand of, and congratulate the Grand Duchess...

Next scene shifts to dinner and the parties seated at each of their tables. The imperial party naturally seated at the head table with Olga, the guest of honor, seated at the middle. Next to her is Standart officer and Aide-de-Camp Nikolai Pavlovich Sablin acting as her honorary escort for the evening. Her sister Tatiana sits immediately to her right and next to her own officer escort N.N. Rodyanov. Among others sits Stana and Militsa with husbands and Grand Duke relatives Nicholas and Peter Nikolaevich. The camera briefly focuses in on the activity at other tables that include younger sister's Marie and Anastasia seated with a number of their imperial relatives. Also in attendance various maids-of-honor, members of the retinue, and local society women being accompanyed by and, in some instances, flirting with various military officers. The attention moves back to the main table and focuses in on a brief conversation between Olga and Nikolai Sablin, an officer some fifteen years her senior...
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline edubs31

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1014
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #391 on: January 15, 2013, 07:16:40 PM »
Olga (whispering): Everyone is looking at me.
Sablin (smiling and responding softly): And why shouldn't they be?
Olga: I know but I'm embarrassed. I didn't think a young lady was entitled to this much attention until her wedding day.
Sablin: Well you highness at least by then you'll know what to expect.
Olga: I think they like me. But of course I am the daughter of the Tsar. They probably feel they must smile and greet me warmly.
Sablin: Oh I think it's much more than that. They see a beautiful young lady...a girl just yesterday who has grown up before their eyes.
Olga: But a girl does not grow up over night.
Sablin: No, but an event such as this is a culmination of sorts. Many in attendance have known you since you were a child. They've watched you evolve from a little girl into a breathtaking young woman. They are happy to be in your presence as much as they care to make an impression on your mother and father.
Olga (giggling): Thank you Nikolai...listen to father carry on!
Sablin: I think he's telling stories of you.
Olga (blushing and turning her head as she grips Sablin's arm): Oh dear Lord!
Nicholas (from across the table): Ten pounds, can you believe it? That beautiful, fair, normal sized daughter of mine was an enormous baby!
Alexandra: I was in labor for seven hours and at nine in the morning they finally needed forceps to pry to poor child loose.
Queen Olga of Greece: Poor child? More like poor woman!
Alexandra: Yes, indeed!
Nicholas: One time when she was a little girl I was told a story from one of our drivers. Apparently they had taken her by a museum in St. Petersburg that was displaying a wonderful collection of carriages. Little Olga demanded to sit in each and every one of them as though trying them out for size and comfort. Finally settling on one she found to be perfect, she looks up and says quite determinedly, "I'll have this one!", and orders that the carriage be brought back to Tsarskoe Selo in time for her daily drive (laughing around the table)...thankfully the order wasn't obeyed. I had to convince her that it was I who told her driver no. Otherwise she was about to insist on him being punished for ignoring her.
Alexandra: Only until she put it out of her mind. A couple of days later they were again the best of friends.
Nicholas (laughing): But my favorite story has to be about that time you commissioned the artist to have the girls portraits taken (turning towards his wife).
Alexandra (smiling): Oh yes. It was only a few months after Marie was born. Olga would have just turned four and Tatiana was two and a half. The artist started out by taking photos, which were charming enough. It was thought that he would then collect them and paint portraits off of those pictures. But the man decided he needed each of the children present, much to the dismay of the girls and their nurse watching over them. He needed each of them to sit fairly still for three or four hours. Much longer than any normal child could sit still. Tatiana obeyed but came to me crying once it was finished. Olga would never be so patient. After a short while she jumped to her feet and shouted, "you are very ugly man, and I don't like you a bit!"...Naturally the artist felt insulted and had the gall to respond, "You are the first lady who has ever said I was ugly, and moreover, I'm not a man, I'm a gentleman!"
Stana (laughing): A gentleman he says? Taking offense to and yelling at a four year old child?
Militsa: A Grand Duchess no less!
Alexandra: I'm actually quite relieved that I was not present as it would have spoiled such an funny story. Our nurse at the time said she was dying of laughter. The gentleman was quite puzzled at her behavior. And wouldn't you know it, Marie, but a baby, was the only one who managed to behave herself!
Nicholas (motioning towards Olga as the laughing continues): Yes, can you imagine what this gentleman would have to say to our lovely daughter here today. (raising his glass to sounds of "Hear!" "Hear!")

The blushing Olga smiles and raises her glass as well. The scene then cuts away and picks up after dinner as the tables are being cleared away making room for a large dance floor. Then taking the hand of his wife and eldest daughter and making their way to the middle of the room the Tsar prepares an announcement...

Nicholas: Since I know my eldest daughter would not want it any other way, we are going to open things up a little and relax the normal formalities. That means you gentleman who find a Grand Duchess to your liking, ask for her hand to dance with without hesitation. No special authorization necessary this evening. I wouldn't want the distraction of having to permit all of your requests anyway since, as you can see (taking hold of his wife's hand who blushes before bowing to the crowd), I already have my partner for the evening and will be most preoccupied (light laughter from the crowd). Just watch yourselves gentleman. I'm a father of four beautiful daughters who obsess over men in uniform (grinning sarcastically, then looking at Alexandra)...alright, let us dance!

An enthusiastic cheer erupts from the crowd as many men are shown approaching their female companions, bowing to them, and then shown making their way onto the dance floor as the Crimean regimental band plays loudly. Workers throw open the glass doors and let the fragrance of roses fill the room. The floor is soon filed by women in gowns with jewels dancing with men in white uniform. We are shown a sequence of pieced together dance scenes including waltzes, contre-dances, hungarians, cotillions, and mazurskas. Those who are not dancing are shown strolling outside in the palace garden and along the marble balconies. One couple engages in a romantic exchange while looking upon the huge autumn moon and it's glowing reflection on the surface of the Black Sea waters...
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline edubs31

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1014
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #392 on: January 15, 2013, 07:16:51 PM »
The camera then focuses in on Olga having danced with her father which is followed quickly by her in the center of the room and in the arms of ADC Sablin. She is in a daze like a fairytale, seemingly lost in the sound of music and adoring eyes encircling both she and her partner from around the room. The scene then shifts to a while later and the Empress seated nearby several women with her young son Alexei standing next to her and showing signs of exhaustion. A woman who has made eye contact with the Tsarevich notices his yawning and smiles in his direction. Seeing this exchange the Empress turns her head and addresses her son...

Alexandra: Oh goodness! Alexei you must go to bed at once.
Alexei (pouting): But I don't want to. I'm alright mother.
Alexandra (slight grin): Alright you say? Look at you yawning behind my back. Don't think I don't know what you're doing?
Alexei: But I'm fine I'm just taking a break.
Alexandra: It has been a long day and you are still just a boy.
Alexei: I want to stay until the girls go! Why do they get to step up all night.
Alexandra: They are all older than you and none of them look so tired. Look at you darling, you can barely keep upright.
Alexei: But mama!
Alexandra: Baby, please, enough. I'm going to see your father...ladies will you excuse me for a moment.

The Empress is then shown making her way over to her husband and leans over his left shoulder while he is seated at a table engaged in a game of Bridge will fellow officers...

Alexandra: Ohhh, I'm no expert darling but I think you should pass.
Nicholas (startled and smoking on a cigar, then quickly hiding his hand): Will you excuse me for a moment gentleman.
Alexandra: I'm sorry to interrupt.
Nicholas (smiling): Don't be silly. As you can see things were not going terribly well for us in that game.
Alexandra: Yes I think tennis is more your game than card playing.
Nicholas: (chuckling then pausing to notice each of his daughters dancing with officers): Look at them. They seem so happy, and Olga most of all.
Alexandra: Tatiana and that young fellow Rodyanov have been inseparable.
Nicholas: Well you know Tanya. Once she becomes smitten with a boy she can look at nothing else. No different than with Marie...and just look at Anastasia and Boris. He must be twice her size!
Alexandra (chuckling): Poor fellow's back will ache for days bending down constantly. But he's a true gentleman...Nicky, Alexei is about to pass out from exhaustion but is being stubborn about going to bed. I was hoping you could step in for a moment?
Nicholas: Yes of course. The poor boy probably misses my attention is all.

The Tsar walks over towards his son and is shown leaning over in front of him from a distance. Their words are drowned out and Alexandra looks on smiling. The scene cuts away momentarily and picks back up long enough to show a pouting but exhausted Alexei being carried out of the room by tutor Pierre Gilliard. Then we are shown a clock on the wall indicating that it is just after 2am. Nicholas and Alexandra extend their formal goodbyes and walk with each other arm in arm to their bedroom, trailed by a pair of palace guards. Alexandra yawns and engages in brief small talk with her husband...

Nicholas (noticing his wife's yawning): Oh my. It seems that bedtime can not come a moment too soon.
Alexandra: Yes, I've been fighting it for at least the last couple of hours...your sure can throw a party my dear.
Nicholas (smiling): We can Sunny. You were marvelous tonight.
Alexandra (smiling in return): Thank you, and you. Do you think Olga enjoyed herself?
Nicholas: I think it was an occasion she will never forget. I'll be surprised if the girl can sleep at all tonight.
Alexandra (giggling): She'll probably be up talking to Tatiana til dawn about all of the handsome officers they met and danced with.
Nicholas: Yes I would imagine so. Amazing to think our eldest daughter is sixteen.
Alexandra: She's a lovely young lady with countless admirable qualities, and will make a fine wife.
Nicholas: Yes, well, I hope she'll remain ours for a little while longer.
Alexandra: Let us hope. Too many more nights like these, surrounded by handsome men, and she'll never be able to decide on just one to commit herself to.

The imperial couple share in some laughter as they the turn the corner and the scene cuts away...
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline TimM

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1938
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #393 on: January 16, 2013, 12:01:00 PM »
Nice family scenes.
Cats: You just gotta love them!

Offline JamesAPrattIII

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 856
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #394 on: January 16, 2013, 07:33:56 PM »
I have a couple of gripes on reply 390 I would have thought the women would have been curtsyong to Alexandra not bowing. Also Olga regiment was the 3rd not the 8th hussars.

You mention Chaliapin in #371 this is something in the book "Tide at Sunrise' on him:

 "Crossing Admiralty Square, madame Kusa, one of the principal dramatic sopranos at the Imperial Russian Opera and wife of a leading Russian composer, saw the cavalry fire the first volley into the crowd.
 "The Japanese you don't know how to kill, but defenseless people at home you kill," she shouted in anger to an officer in the elite Preobrazhemski regiment.
"Pass along, imbecile," he answered.
(Oops! i forgot to mention this was on bloody Sunday)

"Madame Kusa was discharged from the imperial Opera. The mighty Chailapin, the great bass singer and idol of st petersburg, resigned in protest."
(No doubt this was the talk of the town ect)

more "The presitige of the Tsarist name has been ruined for ever," Lenin exulted. "The uprising has begun."

Offline edubs31

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1014
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #395 on: January 16, 2013, 11:04:45 PM »
I have a couple of gripes on reply 390 I would have thought the women would have been curtsyong to Alexandra not bowing. Also Olga regiment was the 3rd not the 8th hussars.

Curtsey rather than bow, yes it will be changed. Funny your mention the Third rather than the Eighth regiment too. I originally had it as the third regiment but then switched it having seen the eighth printed somewhere else. I wasn't certain exactly as to which was correct, but thanks for clearing that up once and for all.
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline Kalafrana

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2912
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #396 on: January 17, 2013, 02:03:42 AM »
Smallish point, but would the younger girls and Alexei have been allowed to stay up for the ball? Alexei was nine years younger than Olga, so barely seven at this point. I would think that he would have been allowed to stay up to see the guests arriving and then hustled off to bed!

Ann

Offline edubs31

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1014
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #397 on: January 17, 2013, 09:10:21 AM »
Ann, I tried not to specify times other than the very end of the ball at 2am.

Regarding Alexei, here is a quote taken right off the AP from General Spiridovitch's observations of the evening...

The Empress, who was quite uncomfortable, followed the party, seated in an armchair next to a column.  Next to her was the Tsarevitch in a white sailor's uniform.  He watched everything going on around him with a genuine curiousity.  The Empress told him to go to bed, but he asked permission to stay.  And, then, he did so again.  It required the intervention of the Emperor.  He approached, said several words, and instantly the Tsarevitch, pouting, retired, accompanied by his teachers Gilliard and Petrov.

So it's hard to tell when exactly he was sent to bed but it seems obvious that he was up for at least a little while. As for the GDs...

Two o'clock rang out, when they finished dancing the final mazurska.  The Empress got up.  Their Majesties went around the room, greeting the guests; the Grand Duchesses extended their hand out to everyone.  The ladies curtseyed deeply and the men bowed profoundly in a most respectful manner, the officers saluted militarily.  Their Majesties and their children retired to their rooms. The ball was over.

Sounds to me like they were up for the entirety of the party. I supposed Spiridovitch might only have been referring to Olga and Tatiana when he speaks of the "Grand Duchesses" and then "children". But since there is no way to confirm that I think I'm going to roll with what I have here. It was a special occasion after all...
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline Kalafrana

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2912
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #398 on: January 17, 2013, 02:15:52 PM »
Erik

If you are going on the basis of what is recorded then that is fine. I was being cautious on the basis that we are dealing with an age when being too young for something that everyone else was enjoying was part of life.

Regards

Ann

Offline edubs31

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1014
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #399 on: January 17, 2013, 06:41:56 PM »
March, 1912 - Moscow

The next scene begins by showing a man in his mid-30s, fairly tall, brown hair and a neatly trimmed mustache & beard being led out of a jail cell and into an interrogation room. A pair of guards place him in a chair where he is seated across from two agents of the Okhrana...

Agent #1: Thank you gentleman, that will be all for now. Please wait outside and we will call for you.
Agent #2 (flipping through paperwork): So, Yakov Yurovsky...is that correct?
Yakov Yurovsky: Yes it is.
Agent #2: It appears you have been placed under arrest by the secret police in connection to several revolutionary activities conducted through your years.
Yakov Yurovsky: I was informed shortly after having been arrested that this was in fact the reason for my detainment.
Agent #1: Are you in a position to dispute the charges against you?
Yakov Yurovsky: Yes I should hope to.
Agent #2: It says here that you have been seen consorting with socialist radicals that we have had under surveillance for quite some time. Your face and name appears several times in connection with them. Constantly in and out of their apartments and places of business. What say you to this?
Yakov Yurovsky: Have I been under personal surveillance or am I seen only when entering and exiting the homes and offices of these particular individuals?
Agent #2: Why do you ask?
Yakov Yurovsky: If the police was monitoring my daily movements, from morning til evening, they would surely have seen that I enter the apartments and places of work of many individuals.
Agent #1: And why do you do that?
Yakov Yurovsky: I am a rather well know jeweler and watchmaker by day. And by evenings and on weekends I work on the side as a part time photographer. Many of these people of interest to you I know only as customers.
Agent #2: Customers you say?
Yakov Yurovsky: Why yes. I know nothing of their political activities. Do socialist revolutionaries not also like to have their portraits taken or their watches fixed? I work for a full service shop in the city, we do many house calls. Our clients are often busy during the days and require us to visit them during business hours when they are unavailable to come to our store.
Agent #1 (getting up from his chair and pacing around the room): I see...and what do you discuss with these men while you are on your appointments and servicing them? Our surveillance tells us that you often spend quite a while in their homes and business. Are you taking pictures Yurovsky or talking politics?
Yakov Yurovsky (grinning): Gentleman. I can see where you might view me with suspicion, but I encourage your men to join me sometime as I sell jewelry to a client. It takes anywhere from 15-minutes to a half an hour for most customers to decide what they like, and that is only if their wives aren't involved. Several more minutes are then required to fill out orders and with such lengthy and expensive transactions I am often offered tea before departing. The same goes for our custom watch repair business. I've often spent up to two hours in the home or office of a client who needs a fix...and, with due respect, have you ever spent time with a professional photographer while he sets up to take a picture? There are many steps to prepare both the camera itself and my subjects for a shot, and I never know how many they will order me to take until we begin.
Agent #2: Sounds to me like you've done well for yourself...but perhaps you can help explain an incident from fifteen years ago involving a workers strike.
Yakov Yurovsky (fidgeting in his chair): Yes, that was regrettable.
Agent #2: I understand you helped organize the strike.
Yakov Yurovsky (after a pause): Well I could sit here an tell you how workers such as I were submitted to inhumane conditions, and naturally angry. But I don't think that is very relevant to your investigation.
Agent #1: And why is that?
Yakov Yurovsky: As your partner has pointed out the event took place fifteen years ago. I was a young man of nineteen, frustrated and angry. But that was then. I regret my involvement but I am no longer such an agitator. I'm a husband, and a father, and as your report has touched on I am a hard worker who keeps very busy.

Yurovsky's voice begins to trail off as the scene fades out, and we pick things back up by flashing forward to some twenty-six years later...
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline edubs31

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1014
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #400 on: January 17, 2013, 06:42:52 PM »
July, 1938 - Kremlin Hospital, Moscow, SFSR

A nurse is shown walking down the isle between the beds of several ill patients carrying a tray of food and milk. Moments later she peaks her head into a private room and notices a visitor seated next to her bed ridden and sprawled patient Yakov Yurovsky. The visitor is Gregory Nikulin, former deputy commandant of the Ural Regional Soviet, who has come to spend some time with his former boss in these his dying hours...

Nurse (noticing Nikulin): Oh, how do you do?
Nikulin: Very well, and you?
Nurse: Fine thank you...Chief Yurovsky I've brought you your lunch.
Yurovsky (smiling feebly): I see that, thank you. Please bring it here. This is my good friend Gregory Nikulin. We were just catching up on old times.
Nurse: Very well...I'll leave you two alone and check back in a half hour. Be sure to eat all of your food today Chief.

Yurovsky smiles in the direction of the nurse who departs the room and picks back up his conversation with Nikulin...

Yurovsky: I tell them it is because I have no appetite that I do not finish, when actually it's because hospital food is so wretched most days.
Nikulin: Yes I would imagine so. Hardly fit for a dog from the looks of it (camera focuses in on a plate of meat and bread, with some soup, and a glass of milk).
Yurovsky: But I cannot complain. They take good care of me. There are far worse places a man can die.
Nikulin: And how are you feeling?
Yurovsky: Hard living has gotten the best of me I'm afraid. I've been a revolutionary and loyal socialist since 1905 and never expected to die over the course of several months in a hospital bed and tending to by nurses.
Nikulin (chuckling): Not what men like we have prepared ourselves for.
Yurovsky (smiling): Certainly not! I wanted to go down and a blaze of glory. Killed by bullets or bayonets. A solider's death! Instead I'm an aging man being conquered by a damn ulcer.
Nikulin: Nothing it seems has turned out as we expected.
Yurovsky (coughing): No. Stalin has turned this country upside down. Is this really the Russia we fought for? The Russia our comrades died for?
Nikulin: Progress is slow, agonizingly so. Lenin's death was a turning point. We expected him to live for many more years and guide us through the uncertainly of the post-revolution. Instead the fight has never ended.
Yurovsky: History has come full circle.
Nikulin: Yes, indeed it has. Our current fight with the Japanese reminds me of the war in 1904. There are growing tensions in Europe. Hitler has Germany mobilized and I fear a war on the scale of the First Great War is inevitable...in the meantime it seems that all we have done is trade one ruthless Tsar for another.
Yurovsky: You know it has been three years since I've seen my daughter Rimma. Purged into one of Stalin's labor camps on suspicion of counter-revolutionary activity. It didn't even matter to the authorities that I was her father. Now I am certain I will never see her again.
Nikulin: It's a crime and a shame.
Yurovsky: It's been four years since our little reunion of the Regional Soviet. My life has been spiraling out of control ever since. I've grown surly and outspoken. My son Alexander has been jotting down some of my memoirs while there is still time.
Nikulin: Any interesting confessions you would like to share with me now? I understand if you'd rather keep things private of course.
Yurovsky (pausing then smirking while in reflection): I've been treated like a leper for years now. You have been one of the only friends I can trust...I'm haunted Nikulin.
Nikulin: Haunted?
Yurovsky: By the ghosts of our past. We all know when my life's history is written what I will be remembered for...the only thing anyone will care to remember.
Nikulin: You mustn't live in regret. You did what you were ordered. We did what we had to do.
Yurovsky: I have been living in regret...now I am dying with remorse. I see their faces, and ever since our return to that place four years ago I've not been able to get it out of my brain. It is my punishment you see. You will say we were following orders, but I think we were cursed to be there. It was all part of the plan. Blood on our hands...mine most of all.
Nikulin: The Tsar had blood on his hands too. Probably the Empress as well.
Yurovsky: And what say you of the others? What say you of Stalin and Lenin and Trotsky? Do all leaders not do what they must for what they believe to be the greater good? But where is our reward...our vindication? He was not the Bloody Tsar on that night. He hadn't been for many months. He was Nicholas Romanov. Husband and father of five...the man was knocked from his pedestal, then imprisoned for more than a year with his family. Was this not enough? Was the shame and humiliation not punishment enough?
Nikulin (pausing): It was determined that a living Nicholas presented a threat to the revolutionary cause. That if he were...
Yurovsky (interrupting): Rubbish! Nicholas was a distant memory by July of 1918. The White's could have rescued him and sent him away. No Romanov would ever have sat at the throne of Russia again...but it wasn't enough for us. The Soviet has no interest in justice, only terror. You see it now, as well as I.
Nikulin: I do Commandant, I do.
Yurovsky (breathing heavily and voice crackling): Listen to me now.
Nikulin (leaning over): Yes Commandant, what is it?
Yurovsky: I must write to my children. I must tell them of their father.
Nikulin: What can I do?
Yurovsky: Write for me now...just write down what I say. I will speak to you and tell you my story. One that they have never known.
Nikulin: Absolutely. I'd be honored to hear it as well!
Yurovsky (strained look as though in pain): Yes, thank you.
Nikulin: I see you have some paper and a pencil on your desk over there.
Yurovsky: Yes that'll do.
Nikulin (helping his sick friend lie down and get comfortable): Here you are...now, with whatever strength you have, speak and I will write.
Yurovsky (after a pause): [continued on next page]
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline edubs31

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1014
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #401 on: January 17, 2013, 06:43:07 PM »
Dear son and daughters. I am now sixty years old. As it turns out I have told you almost nothing of myself, especially my childhood and youth. I was born in 1878 in Tomsk. Ten children grew up in my father's family, and with them poverty bordering on destitution. We could not break out of it, even though the children began working for masters at the age of ten. Father was a glazier and mother a seamstress. They worked hard, to the point of exhaustion. My father was a deeply religious man, but we were Jewish, and slowly through the years we distanced ourselves from our faith. The Empire hated Jews...from the Tsar right down to our peasant neighbors...

I recall a time when I was thirteen, in 1891, that I joined the people of Tomsk in welcoming the Tsarevich...home from his tour of the Far East. We rang church bells and welcomed him with great cheers. It was an event, like a town festival. For one day at least it did not matter that we were poor and run down, Christian or Jew. I can remember vividly standing in a doorway and looking among the cheering crowds waving little Russian flags. Nicholas sped past me along Post Office Street in a brightly painted Troika. I followed the crowd to the Governor's House where he was headed and spoke to us briefly from the balcony. I remember how handsome the heir was with his little neat brown beard. Nicholas nodded and waved to us and for the briefest of moments I could have sworn he looked directly at me. That same face, of a much older man, I would see many years later...

I also vividly remember an argument with my father from after the Heir's visit. We were talking about the future of the Empire under his eventual reign and how he might fair compared to other Tsar's. My father revered Tsar Nicholas I, but standing up to him I explained that it was Alexander II who deserved the glory for his reforms. A truly conservative fellow my father unleashed his anger upon me and I ran away for two days. When I returned everything seemed different. My outlook had been altered, time had changed and this was a different era. I grew to detest Alexander III and, when he died, his son Nicholas. To me the new Tsar was a fiend, a bloodsucker and a killer. And finally I came to yet another understanding...that everything was made by the hands of workers and peasants, and that the Emperor was dependent on us. We controlled their destinies...

It was around this time that I began to study as a watchmaker. My master got himself rich off the sufferings of his adolescent workers. I worked for him until I was nineteen and never knew what it meant to eat my fill. It was then, now a young man, that I organized a workers strike and was jailed for several days. Forbidden to enter the town's watch and jewelry shops. I wandered for a time eventually honing my skill as a watchmaker and jeweler before settling down in 1904 in the city of Ekaterinburg. The place that would come to shape my destiny. I married your mother that year and beginning in 1905 I never ceased working for the Bolshevik Party for a single day. The revolution that year has a profound effect on my sensibilities and I realized my children deserved a different life from the one I was forced to live...a life of freedom and hope...

But Russia had become unsafe for Bolsheviks and revolutionaries and not wanting to be arrested and parted from my family I took you to Berlin. There your mother and I chose to covert to Lutheranism for various reasons that bear no consequence at this point. Religion is cynical and pointless and I was happy to change my stripes to fit in with whatever crowd I was part of at a particular time...be it Jewish, Orthodox, Lutheran, or Catholic. After returning us home to Russia the authorities finally caught up to me. Fortunately their evidence against me was flimsy and I was able to convince them my activities from years earlier were the ramblings of angry young man who had since been married with children, found a steady job, and settled down. In a odd twist of fate they sent me back to Ekaterinburg where by day I worked as a photographer and by night I dedicated myself, in secret, to socialist activities and the spreading of propaganda...

A few months after the war began I was drafted into the army. But instead of serving in the ordinary ranks I signed up for medical training and was assigned to the 198th Perm Infantry Regiment as a field hospital orderly. Perhaps it should only make sense that my life is destined to end, laid up in hospital bed, where I write you this letter. The war raged on and I was exposed to its horrors constantly. The blood and the suffering and the despair hardened me. After the revolution in 1917 I deserted my post and headed back home to Ekaterinburg. That fall I become one of the founding members of the Ural Regional Soviet, and shortly thereafter I was appointed Deputy Regional Commissar of Justice and joined the Regional Cheka. It made only perfect sense then that shortly after turning forty years of age I would be appointed Commandant of the Ipatiev House. Being held there was the Imperial Family and their retainers...[interrupted]

While Yurovsky tells his story we are shown the people, places and events as he describes them. He is then cut off, momentarily at least, by his nurse who suddenly reappears...

Nurse: Pardon me gentleman...Chief Yurovsky you have barely touched your food!
Yurovsky (clearing his throat): Oh, yes, I am sorry. We are rambling on here.
Nikulin: Yes, it is I who should apologize. Madame I will see to it that the Commandant...err...the Chief finishes his food.
Nurse (after a pause): Very well...please make sure of it. He needs his strength.

The nurse departs from the room and we are shown Nikulin picking back up his pencil. Yurovsky is able to sit up long enough to place a couple of forks full of food into his mouth. Before they are able to resume conversation the scene fades out and cuts away...
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline TimM

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1938
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #402 on: January 18, 2013, 01:15:54 AM »
Interesting that you took us a couple of decades into the future for this scene. 
Cats: You just gotta love them!

Offline blessOTMA

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2527
  • Tell me the truth, monsieur
    • View Profile
    • Stay at Home Artist
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #403 on: January 18, 2013, 01:37:25 AM »
Terrific writing!  the son and daughter letter reminds me of my own! lol

Love the Olga  birthday dialog !

You are lucky to have folks like JamesAPrattIII  and Ann to help with the correct details... because there are so many,
they need more than one pair of eyes imo

Great!

"Give my love to all who remember me."

  Olga Nikolaevna

Offline edubs31

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1014
    • View Profile
Re: New Nicholas & Alexandra Video - Mini Series? Part II
« Reply #404 on: January 18, 2013, 08:31:54 AM »
Thanks Anne & Tim,

Yes I need all the help I can get. As I write more I think I get better accustomed to their dialogue, speech patters and those pesky local colloquialism...but it's still not easy.

The letter is largely based off of an actual letter Yurovsky wrote to a couple of his daughters. I've filled in some of the holes because I wanted  it to detail more of his life story...at least in brief. I figure there are three main villains in the story that deserve to have their pre-revolution life touched on; Lenin, Kerensky, Yurovsky. Others such as Trotsky, Stalin and the assassins are naturally touched on as well.

Thanks for the support!
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...