Author Topic: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)  (Read 77966 times)

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Offline Rodney_G.

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #90 on: February 03, 2014, 06:52:00 PM »
Was Ruskoe Slovo generally associated with any political party or leaning? The imputation of a conspiracy to a friend of an ex-Romanov  Grand Duchess simply for visiting her in exile suggests something fairly left wing. And how would they know about this? A government source?
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Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #91 on: February 07, 2014, 04:23:46 PM »
Was Ruskoe Slovo generally associated with any political party or leaning? The imputation of a conspiracy to a friend of an ex-Romanov  Grand Duchess simply for visiting her in exile suggests something fairly left wing. And how would they know about this? A government source?


I suppose that "Russkoe Slovo" would generally have been considered a Central-Right newspaper.

It was the cheapest newspaper in Russia with a very large subscription base.

The paper covered the general news, politics, military, the cultural social life of the country, etc.
“Iskry” was its illustrated Sunday supplement.

On a couple of occasions when the paper was undergoing financial difficulties, the Imperial Government gave it some funds.

For the whole story on M. S. Khitrovo’s journey to Tobolsk and the ridiculous uproar it caused, see the earlier postings in this thread:
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=204.msg61597#msg61597
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=204.msg406334#msg406334
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=204.msg406341#msg406341

And as the article in "Iskry" made clear, the Provisional Government's real fear was not that the Imperial Family might suffer some violence at the hands of the extremists, but rather, that the monarchists might attempt a restoration of the old order. The State Prosecutor stated that "the plot arose even before the Tsar's transfer to Tobolsk".

What Kerensky wrote and said abroad, after the Bolshevik coup and the murder of the Imperial Family, contradicts what he said and did at the time that he was in power.

(In his books S. Melgunov, the historian, continually points out the many such contradictions in all the memoirs written by the leaders of the February Revolution.)
   
By sending the Imperial family to Tobolsk, Kerensky attempted to calm both the Right and the Left. He assured the former that he was protecting the Imperial family; while he told the later that he was banishing them to Siberia.

M. I. Tereshchenko, the Provisional Government’s Minister of Finance, admitted to George Buchanan, the English Ambassador, that the real motive was Kerensky’s fear of monarchist rescue plots. (See: Richard Abraham, Alexander Kerensky [Columbia University Press: NY, 1987], p. 246.)

And in an interview, A. M. Nikitin, the Provisional Government’s Minister of Internal Affairs, stated that “The Provisional Government considered it imperative to remove them [the Imperial family] from Petrograd in order to weaken, or, to be more precise, to cut off at the root any thought of an attempt to restore them to power…” (Izvestia, September 20, 1917).

Richard Pipes, the eminent historian, agrees that Kerensky’s fear of a right-wing counter-revolution and of a restoration of the monarchy was the real purpose for his sending the Imperial family to Tobolsk. Kerensky also sought to ingratiate himself with the Executive Committee of the Petrograd Soviet. (Pipes: The Russian Revolution, pp. 437–38.)

Witness the whole Kornilov affair.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2014, 04:26:36 PM by Inok Nikolai »
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Offline Rodney_G.

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #92 on: February 08, 2014, 03:05:56 PM »
Thank you, Inok Nikolai for your elaboration. I think it's pretty clear to any objective and rational observer that the gross overreaction of Kerensky and his Prov. Gov. to Rita's trip to Tobolsk to visit and succor  her friend Olga N. and the IF and household there represented their  fear that a Romanov might be restored to the throne.

I'm inclined to view this fear as irrational on the PG's part, at least insofar as its being realised through the  young and  well-intentioned,  and apolitical ex-lady in waiting to the Empress was concerned. If Rita K. was a conspiratorial threat, then the PG was indeed on shaky ground. (as in fact it was, though not from any efforts of monarchists).
Rodney G.

Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #93 on: April 29, 2014, 05:07:15 PM »

I don't know if this is just a quibble, blessOTMA, but I think the children's  smooth haircuts were done just a few months after the Feb/March revolution, so I don't know that I'd say "well after" it. If we can't date Rita's haircut pretty definitively we can't connect it to OTMAAs' very well one way or another.

Rita could possibly  have caught the measles which necessitated the close haircutting  from any of OTMA who were working with her in the lazaret,except that none of OTMAA appeared in the lazaret after the first disturbances at Tsarskoe Selo made it difficult or dangerous  to do so.


While proofreading the Letters from Captivity, I happened upon this passage which narrows down somewhat the time of Rita having shaved her hair:

In a letter to Anna Vyrubova of Dec. 15, 1917, the full text has the following sentence (which does not appear in Anna's memoirs):
"Their [the Grand Duchesses'] hair is growing marvelously, so they can go about without scarves -- like Rita last winter."

So, by the winter of 1915/16, Rita's hair had already grown back enough that she could go without a scarf. Thus, her head was shaved a good while before then.

Hope this helps.
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Offline Antonina

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #94 on: July 03, 2014, 10:58:02 AM »
Some pictures wrom the new book about Charles Gibbs (these are well-known, but from Ritka's own archives).


Oh how tall she was!

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Offline Antonina

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #95 on: July 03, 2014, 10:59:39 AM »
New ones: young and old Rita.

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Offline Antonina

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #96 on: July 03, 2014, 11:02:22 AM »
On the last photo she is holding a box with her dearest relics - IF's letters and presents. Some years ago it came back to Russia.
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Offline Sarushka

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #97 on: July 03, 2014, 08:33:27 PM »
So nice to finally have those beach photos in good quality!
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
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Offline KarinK

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #98 on: July 04, 2014, 05:26:45 AM »
More gems! Thank you again, Antonina!

Offline Rodney_G.

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #99 on: July 07, 2014, 10:58:17 AM »
New ones: young and old Rita.



The young Rita looks a bit like Maria N. there.
Rodney G.

Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #100 on: July 07, 2014, 11:18:14 AM »
More gems! Thank you again, Antonina!

These are also from the new book on Gibbs in Russian:
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=1251.msg536668#msg536668
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Offline Antonina

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #101 on: July 07, 2014, 11:58:54 AM »
More gems! Thank you again, Antonina!

These are also from the new book on Gibbs in Russian:
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php?topic=1251.msg536668#msg536668

Yes - thank you for the addition and for the review! All the pictures I've posted last week are from this book.
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Offline blessOTMA

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #102 on: July 07, 2014, 09:30:55 PM »
So nice to finally have those beach photos in good quality!

Amen to that!!! That group photo in the waves I have wanted to see clearly for decades!!
Now I can paint it some day .

We all have Romanov photo wishes...this was a dear one for me and now I have seen it !!

Thank you so much!!!!
« Last Edit: July 07, 2014, 09:35:34 PM by blessOTMA »

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Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #103 on: July 17, 2014, 03:49:32 PM »
On the last photo she is holding a box with her dearest relics - IF's letters and presents. Some years ago it came back to Russia.

Yes, as reported elsewhere here on the Forum, the Khitrovo descendents deposited them in GARF in March 2009.


And how M. S. Khitrovo managed to save her treasures from the Imperial family is nothing short of miraculous.

As recounted by her brother, Vladimir, in Paris in 1967:
(Taken from the new book out in Russian on Gibbs and others.)

Rita had reached Odessa. In April of 1919, the French intervention forces evacuated the city. Rita decided to stay in Russia for the time being, but, expecting to be arrested by the Reds, she sought to preserve her letters and remembrances of the Imperial family. So, on the last day of the evacuation, she went down to the port, introduced herself to the first French officer she happened to meet and asked him to rescue her packet. He took the packet; she noted his name, and then he left with the French forces.

Meanwhile Rita managed to hide until the Volunteer White Army arrived, after which she left with them and settled in Yugoslavia, where she also married.

Five years later, in the spring of 1924, her brother Vladimir and his wife moved to Paris. In December of that year, Rita wrote to Vladimir, asking him to track down the French officer and retrieve her treasure. Vladimir put off doing so because he was new in Paris, not familiar with the city, and, besides, there were a few hundred people in Paris with the same surname as the French officer.

A year and a half later, Vladimir and his wife were invited by friends to have supper in a restaurant. Vladimir was late, and when he arrived the others were already seated at a table. One of them called out to him, by surname, to join them. At the end of the meal, a Russian man sitting at the table next to theirs took Vladimir aside and asked him if he had heard correctly: Was his name indeed Khitrovo? When Vladimir replied in the affirmative, the man went on to explain that since 1921 he had been working at a French firm’s branch office in Constantinople and was only in Paris on vacation. His boss in Constantinople had been an officer in Odessa in 1919, and had received a packet from a Rita Khitrovo, etc.!!

(The former French officer had sought to find Rita, but had been hampered by the fact that she had married and her surname was now Erdeli.)

A few months later the former French officer himself came to Paris and handed over the packet to Vladimir, who promptly sent it to his sister in Yugoslavia by means of the Russian Orthodox Church authorities there. Thus, in March of 1926, Rita finally received back her precious case!
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Offline Rodney_G.

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Re: Margarita Sergeevna Khitrovo, "Rita" (1895-1952)
« Reply #104 on: July 17, 2014, 06:30:14 PM »
Just wonderful.
Rodney G.