Author Topic: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history  (Read 116908 times)

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Offline TampaBay

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #165 on: January 23, 2006, 08:51:20 AM »
The American actor Edward G. Robinson was born in Romania!!! 

Does anyone know of any other world famous actors born in Romania or of direct Romanian descent!

TampaBay
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by TampaBay »
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palimpsest

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #166 on: January 23, 2006, 09:26:55 AM »
There aren't many :-/


There was Elvira Popescu, well known in France.
There are a lot of opera singers [Cotrubas, Angela Gheorghiu, etc.]



Recently only two Romanian actors have played in well known movies:

Marcel Iures
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0411903/
The Peacemaker (1997)
Mission: Impossible (1996)


and

Alexandra Maria Lara [mostly in Germany]
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0487884/
The Downfall (2004)



Both Iures and Lara have major roles in the next film of Francis Ford Coppola:
Youth without youth [in production]
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0481797/
[after a novella by Romanian philosopher Mircea Eliade]
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by palimpsest »

palimpsest

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #167 on: January 23, 2006, 12:52:04 PM »
How could have I forgoten my dear friend:

Maia Morgenstein
http://imdb.com/name/nm0605164/
The Passion of the Christ (2004)

Marina_Cummings

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #168 on: January 23, 2006, 03:06:58 PM »
I don't know about recently, but in the past:

- Edward G. Robinson was born in Romania, as Emanuel Goldenberg to a Jewish family in Bucharest, he emigrated with his family to New York in 1903.

-Johnny Weissmuller was  born in Austria-Hungary , but in a town now in the Romanian Banat.

-Jean Negulesco was a Romanian-born American film director.

John Houseman was a Romanian-born actor and film producer. He was born Jacques Haussmann.  In the United States he took the stage name of John Houseman.

- Lauren Bacall was born in New York City as Betty Joan Perskewhose parents were  Jewish immigrants, her father was William Perske (born in Poland, in an area which is now part of Belarus) and Natalie Weinstein-Bacal (born in Romania). … She made her acting debut as Betty Bacall in 1942, in Johnny Two by Four -her stage name is derived from her mother's Romanian maiden name, Bacal.

- Stanley Kubrick was the son of a doctor. His Jewish paternal grandparents stemmed from Austria and Romania.

palimpsest

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #169 on: January 23, 2006, 03:15:57 PM »
Wow! I didn't know all this! :o

I love Lauren Bacall and Stanley Kubrick!  :)

Offline Laura_

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #170 on: January 23, 2006, 03:23:58 PM »
Quote

-Johnny Weissmuller was  born in Austria-Hungary , but in a town now in the Romanian Banat.




Tarzan was actually born in my town,Timisoara :D indeed part of the Romanian Banat
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Laurra »

palimpsest

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #171 on: January 23, 2006, 03:40:38 PM »
Quote


he has played  also in Hart's War(2002) together with Colin Farrell and Bruce Willis  8)--a great movie about WW2 and nazism




I'll check this one out, I didn't know about it!

Timisoara, great city! I have good friends there!  :) And you are close to Savarsin Castle. :)

Offline Laura_

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #172 on: January 23, 2006, 03:50:12 PM »
Quote

I'll check this one out, I didn't know about it!




that's a great movie ,he plays a Colonel who  in the end shots Bruce Willis >:(,i watched it several times can't believe he has actually played together with Colin Farrell ::)

oh and he [Marcel] is my Romanian professor's good friend ,they know each other from their youth ;)

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Laurra »

dvoretzky

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #173 on: January 24, 2006, 12:26:40 AM »
Dustin Hoffman, actor (Romanian mother)...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_East_European_Jews

Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Harvey Keitel
The son of a Polish mother and Romanian father, he spent most of his youth on the ...
www.reference.com/browse/wiki/Harvey_Keitel

Offline Laura_

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #174 on: January 24, 2006, 03:18:10 AM »
nice!!! did not know about this:) thanks...

Alex_for_King

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #175 on: December 14, 2006, 01:45:59 AM »
In the Royal Palace - on Saint Apostle Andrew Day, the Patron Saint of the Serbian Royal Family
 
Special and exclusive report by Alex
 
Belgrade, Serbia, December 13, 2006.  --- Tonight was the Slava of His Royal Highness Crown Prince Alexander II and Her Royal Highness Princess Katherine Karadjordjevic (and the entire Serbian Royal Family). Slava refers to paying tribute to a particular Saint patron of a family or institution. Slava is a tradition unique to the Serbian Orthodox Church only. Due to strained relations between the two branches of the Royal Family, unfortunately no other Royals were present. It would be so nice if all of them were celebrating the Slava together.
 
Location, Beli Dvor, or the White Palace, at the prestigious quart of Dedinje in the Serbian capital. So far I have been to quite a few receptions in Belgrade, but no other place has managed to boost so many of my emotions, as the Palace. Every time feels like the first time. I remember the first time I met the Royal couple. It was also their Slava a few years ago. My knees were shaking as I thought to myself: "This is it, Alex. This is what you have been waiting for, and wanting, so take it easy". I then met the Royal Family again at the Slava of the City of Belgrade, and I met Princess Elizabeth (Jelisaveta) at an icon exhibition, and I met Princess Linda just recently, at a panel on Kosovo. After that, I visited the Palace compound once as a tourist, and twice on business, when I visited the Foundation of Princess Katherine, located in one of the peripheral, small buildings within the compound. But, the Slava in the White Palace itself, that is something else. That is an event. You know the saying in America - everybody who is anybody wants to be there.
 
Here is how it went. First, I got invited in my own name and last name, which was great, because the previous time I did not go in my name. Rather, I was an "attachment" . Now that the invitation came in my name, so that is a step forward. After receiving the invitation, I sent an email where I gave the details of me and the lady accompanying me - who we are, what we do, etc. I confirmed our arrival and thanked them for the invitation.
 
Having a decent car, we arrived at the gate. The soldier belonging to the Guard of the Army of Serbia stopped us.
 
- Good evening.
- Good evening.
- May I see your invitation, please?
- Yes, you may.
 
He spent several minutes looking for our names in the list. Then he smiled, handed me back the invitation and said: "Here you go. Enjoy your stay".
 
- Thank you very much. I certainly will.  
 
We parked the car and had to walk some distance because many cars were already there. We approached the main entrance. The state flag of Serbia (with the royal crown), outside. Red carpet. The works. I've always had this thing for red carpets. I guess that's because I must have watched Dynasty a lot when I was little.


It was so powerful. My date kept looking at every detail. For me, this was a re-run of what I have already seen, so I did not stare at every exhibit. After a lot of receptions, you get used to meeting important people, and after a few appearances in the media, you start to feel accustomed to it all, without feeling nervous. Or, at least you try to convince yourself that it is so.
 
Our host and hostess were standing there, patiently smiling and greeting everyone. I signed a comment in the Guest Book, in Cyrilic. I signed my name and it will stay there, forever. Just as I was really working on the cursive letters, for which Cyrilic is wonderful, someone pushed me from behind and I made a mess out of my writing. I gave that man the look...
 
Above the Crown Prince and Princess, a portrait of King Alexander I of Yugoslavia, who was the grandfather of the current Crown Prince. The street on which the Palace compound stands bears the name of another Alexander - Prince Alexander, who ruled from 1842 to 1858. Symbols of the Serbian Monarchy are all around us, but Serbia stubbornly still remains a Republic. One day, Alex, one day, all things will fall into place, I said to myself...
 
TO BE CONTINUED...

Alex_for_King

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #176 on: December 14, 2006, 01:47:54 AM »
PART 2.

Finally, it was my turn to say hello. Cameras flashing. Did I say I was NOT nervous? I lied. I approached the Crown Prince. I bowed descreetly.
 
- Your Majesty, happy Slava to you! May you celebrate it in good health and spirit, for a long time!
 
I then handed him over the present. The brass Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Serbia, identical to today's Coat of Arms (Greater variety) of the Republic of Serbia.
 
(For me he is the King and I called him Your Majesty instead of Your Highness - so the mistake was purely intentional on my part).
 
He smiled and said:
 
- Thank you and welcome.
 
Princess Katherine was smiling with such a smile that lit up the room. For her, I gave her an extended bow. I also told her:
 
-  Your Majesty, happy Slava to you!
 
She said:
 
- Thank you.
 
By this time the adrenalin was pumping so hard I thought I was going to faint. So, as I approached the big room, I took a whisky just to relax myself.
 
Several rooms were available for moving around so my date and I looked at the paintings and other exhibits. The library is really nice. The story goes that, when Soviet Red Army and Tito's Partisans "liberated" Belgrade from Nazi occupation, they actually burned many books to heat themselves and their tanks. Not to mention that they actually fired a bullet in Christ's forehead (in the dome of the Royal chapel). Another legacy of the Communists is the graveyard of Tito's war time mistress Davorjanka Paunovic. But, as the Crown Prince says - all that belongs to history now. We must look ahead. My all-time favorite sentence of his is - we must crown democracy before we crown a King.
 
The menu included fasting food (no meat or other animal products) since the Fast is in progress until the day of the Nativity of Our Lord (Christmas), which the Serbian Orthodox Church celebrates on January 7. (I hope I have said this right in English). So, we helped ourselves to a plethora of small sandwiches, Serbian pies, fish and cookies. All of those were in several varities, very nice and colorful to look at and very tasty to savor.
 
I recognized Mr. Dragomir Acovic of the Advisory Bodies of the Crown. Other faces were unfamiliar. Several receptions were organized for several groups. Group one, from 4 to 5.30 pm. Group 2 from 6 to 7.30 pm. Group 3 from 8 to 9.30 pm. I was in group 1, and I guess that the state officials and other most important figures will be attending the evening reception in group 3.
 
This was one of those days that I will remember forever.
 
THE END

Offline amelia

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #177 on: December 14, 2006, 08:24:13 AM »
Dear Alex,

Thank you so much for the posting.  My dream is one day to visit the balkan Countries, including Serbia and Montenegro. In the moment I am reading Nikola and Milena, since I want to read as much as I can before travelling.  I also read the story of Queen Draga and King Alexander. Do you know of any other books I could read either in French or English.

Once again thanks for the posting - I really like the Serbian royal family. Do they live in Belgrade permanently, including the young princes?
Thank you
Amelia

Offline Marlene

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #178 on: December 14, 2006, 08:34:52 AM »


Alex, what great memories.  I will always remember my 5 days in Belgrade for the Crown prince's birthday in 2005.  As guests, we got to wonder around - and I explored upstairs at the Beli Dvor.  We also had a private tour of the royal palace, and we could take photos, touch the stuff, and sit on the furniture.



In the Royal Palace - on Saint Apostle Andrew Day, the Patron Saint of the Serbian Royal Family
 
Special and exclusive report by Alex
 
Belgrade, Serbia, December 13, 2006.  --- Tonight was the Slava of His Royal Highness Crown Prince Alexander II and Her Royal Highness Princess Katherine Karadjordjevic (and the entire Serbian Royal Family). Slava refers to paying tribute to a particular Saint patron of a family or institution. Slava is a tradition unique to the Serbian Orthodox Church only. Due to strained relations between the two branches of the Royal Family, unfortunately no other Royals were present. It would be so nice if all of them were celebrating the Slava together.
 
Location, Beli Dvor, or the White Palace, at the prestigious quart of Dedinje in the Serbian capital. So far I have been to quite a few receptions in Belgrade, but no other place has managed to boost so many of my emotions, as the Palace. Every time feels like the first time. I remember the first time I met the Royal couple. It was also their Slava a few years ago. My knees were shaking as I thought to myself: "This is it, Alex. This is what you have been waiting for, and wanting, so take it easy". I then met the Royal Family again at the Slava of the City of Belgrade, and I met Princess Elizabeth (Jelisaveta) at an icon exhibition, and I met Princess Linda just recently, at a panel on Kosovo. After that, I visited the Palace compound once as a tourist, and twice on business, when I visited the Foundation of Princess Katherine, located in one of the peripheral, small buildings within the compound. But, the Slava in the White Palace itself, that is something else. That is an event. You know the saying in America - everybody who is anybody wants to be there.
 
Here is how it went. First, I got invited in my own name and last name, which was great, because the previous time I did not go in my name. Rather, I was an "attachment" . Now that the invitation came in my name, so that is a step forward. After receiving the invitation, I sent an email where I gave the details of me and the lady accompanying me - who we are, what we do, etc. I confirmed our arrival and thanked them for the invitation.
 
Having a decent car, we arrived at the gate. The soldier belonging to the Guard of the Army of Serbia stopped us.
 
- Good evening.
- Good evening.
- May I see your invitation, please?
- Yes, you may.
 
He spent several minutes looking for our names in the list. Then he smiled, handed me back the invitation and said: "Here you go. Enjoy your stay".
 
- Thank you very much. I certainly will.  
 
We parked the car and had to walk some distance because many cars were already there. We approached the main entrance. The state flag of Serbia (with the royal crown), outside. Red carpet. The works. I've always had this thing for red carpets. I guess that's because I must have watched Dynasty a lot when I was little.


It was so powerful. My date kept looking at every detail. For me, this was a re-run of what I have already seen, so I did not stare at every exhibit. After a lot of receptions, you get used to meeting important people, and after a few appearances in the media, you start to feel accustomed to it all, without feeling nervous. Or, at least you try to convince yourself that it is so.
 
Our host and hostess were standing there, patiently smiling and greeting everyone. I signed a comment in the Guest Book, in Cyrilic. I signed my name and it will stay there, forever. Just as I was really working on the cursive letters, for which Cyrilic is wonderful, someone pushed me from behind and I made a mess out of my writing. I gave that man the look...
 
Above the Crown Prince and Princess, a portrait of King Alexander I of Yugoslavia, who was the grandfather of the current Crown Prince. The street on which the Palace compound stands bears the name of another Alexander - Prince Alexander, who ruled from 1842 to 1858. Symbols of the Serbian Monarchy are all around us, but Serbia stubbornly still remains a Republic. One day, Alex, one day, all things will fall into place, I said to myself...
 
TO BE CONTINUED...
Author of Queen Victoria's Descendants,
& publisher of Royal Book News.
Visit my blog, Royal Musings  http://royalmusingsblogspotcom.blogspot.com/

Offline Marlene

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Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #179 on: December 14, 2006, 08:35:57 AM »
Alexander and Katherine live nearly all the time in Belgrade (they also have an apartment in London).  Alex's three sons live full time in the USA and London, at this time, where they work.

Dear Alex,

Thank you so much for the posting.  My dream is one day to visit the balkan Countries, including Serbia and Montenegro. In the moment I am reading Nikola and Milena, since I want to read as much as I can before travelling.  I also read the story of Queen Draga and King Alexander. Do you know of any other books I could read either in French or English.

Once again thanks for the posting - I really like the Serbian royal family. Do they live in Belgrade permanently, including the young princes?
Thank you
Amelia
Author of Queen Victoria's Descendants,
& publisher of Royal Book News.
Visit my blog, Royal Musings  http://royalmusingsblogspotcom.blogspot.com/