Author Topic: Empress Anna Ioannovna  (Read 44215 times)

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Offline cimbrio

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Empress Anna Ioannovna
« on: February 26, 2005, 04:50:05 PM »
How did Tsaritsa Anna I Ivanovna's husband, Friedrich Wilhelm, Duke of Kurland, die of? I know they were married in 1710 in Petersburg but he died on their way back to Kurland the following year on January 21st, which seems very suspicious. I believe Anna I remained in Kurland for a few more years till her accession in 1730.  Can anyone help me to find out what happened to him on their trip back?

Offline Marc

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2005, 07:33:11 AM »
Any good pictures of Anna,her husband,important persons of that time?

hikaru

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2005, 08:32:31 AM »
It is very good story with full of the white pieces:
I heard 2 following versions:
1) Anna never saw her husband alive. Marriage was done by agreement ( the role of the husband was done by somebody else). Her husband to be was going to
meet her near Kurlyandiya , but on the way he overflowed, she she met drowned man.

2) Her husband drank so much during the marriage festival in Kurlyandiya and dead of overdrank.

Anyway she had no time to have any conversation or somethingelse   to him.


RomanovFan

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2005, 01:13:49 PM »
I don't know if there's already a thread about this monarch. Who was she? I keep thinking she was Peter III's mother, sister to Empress Elizabeth, but that's not right....

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2005, 01:17:50 PM »
She was Elizabeth's cousin, the daughter of Ivan V, Peter the Great's brother.
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

Emperor_Nikolai_I

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2005, 01:31:23 PM »
Under her reign (1730-1740) the Germans had much influence in Russia.

David_Pritchard

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2005, 10:13:32 PM »
Quote
Under her reign (1730-1740) the Germans had much influence in Russia.


These many German bureaucrats and technocrats would best be described as Baltic Germans as opposed to Germans from the Holy Roman Empire. Empress Anna Ivanova, prior to ascending the Russian Throne, was the Duchess of Kurland (part of modern day Latvia), a country that had an extremely large and influential aristocratic German population.

David

David_Pritchard

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2005, 01:32:51 PM »
This translation of an original document should be interesting to anyone who has been curious about Empress Anna:

The "Conditions" of Anna Ivanovna's Accession to the Throne, 1730

We hereby give a most binding promise that my main concern and effort shall be not only to maintain but to spread, as far as possible and in every way, our Orthodox faith of the Greek Confession. Moreover, after accepting the Russian crown, I will not enter into wedlock so long as I live; nor will I designate a successor, either in my lifetime or after. We also promise that, since the safety and welfare of every state depends upon good counsel, we will always maintain the Supreme Privy Council as it is at present established with its membership of eight persons. Without the consent of this Supreme Privy Council:

1. We will not start a war with anybody.

2. We will not conclude peace.

3. We will not burden our faithful subjects with new taxes.

4. We will not promote anybody to high rank--above the rank of colonel--either in the civil or military service, be it on land or sea, nor will we assign any important affair to anybody; the guards and other important regiments are to remain under the control of the Supreme Privy Council.

5. We will not deprive members of the nobility [shliakhetstvo] of life, possessions, or honor without a court of law.

6. We will not grant any patrimonies [votchiny] or villages.

7. We will not promote anyone, whether Russian or foreign, to an office at court without the advice of the Supreme Privy Council.

8. We will not spend any revenues of state.

And [we also promise] to maintain an unalterably favorable disposition toward all our faithful subjects. Should I not carry out or fail to live up to any part of this promise, I shall be deprived of the Russian crown.


Translation by Daniel Field

David_Pritchard

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2005, 01:36:00 PM »
An image of Empress Anna Ivanova on a bronze commemorative table medal struck to celebrate the signing of a peace treaty with the Ottoman Empire on 7 September 1739. The reverse of the medal bears the words "Glorious Empire".






Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2005, 01:40:08 PM »
Anna more or less ignored those conditions as soon as she reasonably could, didn't she?
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

bell_the_cat

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2005, 02:02:16 PM »
Yes, she sent the people who had brought her to power (the Dolgorukys) into exile, and appointed her own ministers. Russia was effectively ruled during her reign by Biron, a Courlander, who may or may not have been her lover.

In spite of her many eccentricities (she loved cruel practical jokes), her reign was not that bad. As the medal shows, they managed to beat the Turks!

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2005, 02:05:21 PM »
Is this the family that spawned Catherine Dolgoruky?
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

bell_the_cat

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2005, 02:21:17 PM »
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Is this the family that spawned Catherine Dolgoruky?


Yes. The Dolgorukys took power during the reign of Peter II by engineering the overthrow of Peter the Great's favourite Alexander Menschikov. One of the Dolgoruky girls was to be married to Peter II, but he took ill with smallpox and died on his wedding day, when he was only 14!

Legend has it that the girl was forced into his death bed in the hope of producing an heir. Peter was very precocious, by the way: he enjoyed organising wild parties with his auntie Elizabeth Petrovna!

The Dolgorukys then hit on the idea of appointing Anna to the throne, thinking it would be easy to dominate her. They were wrong!

Catherine Dolgoruky, the second wife of Alexander II was a member of this family. This seems to me unjust, as in Russian terms the Dolgorukys were just as grand as (and much richer) than the Hesse-Darmstadts, for example.


Offline Mike

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2005, 02:28:34 PM »
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The reverse of the medal bears the words "Glorious Empire".

The writing can be translated either "The Empire's Glory" or "Hail the Empire".

RomanovFan

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Re: Empress Anna Ioannovna
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2006, 12:46:04 PM »
I noticed they always make the early empresses look fat on the coins...like Empress Elizabeth and Catherine II in her later years and Anna Ivanovna. Was that their true likenesses or was someone exagerrating?