Author Topic: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal  (Read 135301 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Eric_Lowe

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 16999
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #105 on: December 28, 2007, 03:06:02 AM »
A restoration may be in order ?  ???

Offline dmitri

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2018
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #106 on: December 28, 2007, 05:22:34 AM »
It is about as likely as being able to travel to Pluto and back the same day on the new A380.

Offline José

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 638
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #107 on: January 17, 2008, 06:33:19 PM »
Program of the cerimonies evoking the regicide of King D.Carlos and Prince D.Luis Felipe.

http://www.dcarlos100anos.pt/programa.html

Also, a statue of King D.Carlos will be unveiled in Cascais at the entrance of the Cidadela, the summer residence of the Portuguese Kings, and, nowadays, official summer residence of the Presidents.
(I never heard any of them stayed there since 1975/76).

http://www.cm-cascais.pt/Cascais/Noticias/estatua_d_Carlos.htm

Last September D.Duarte inaugurated another statue (bas-relief) together with the Mayor of Cascais, António d'Orey Capucho, at the small village of Areias on Cascais surroundings.
Judging by the photo, they could have done better...

http://causamonarquica.wordpress.com/2007/09/21/rei-d-carlos-i-homenageado-em-cascais/

The Citadel Palace is undergoing a major restoration and will open as a museum depicting the life of the RF namely of D.Luis (who died in Cascais) and D.Carlos.

http://www.guiadacidade.pt/portugal/?G=monumentos.ver&artid=900&distritoid=11

There is a bust of King D.Luis nearby, next to Hotel Baía, for those who know the place.
And of course the statue of King D.Pedro I besides the Town Hall.

http://www.lifecooler.com/edicoes/lifecooler/desenvReg.asp?reg=301786&catbn=11
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Cascais_5.JPG
http://web.educom.pt/p4poa/Trabalho%20Cascais.htm
http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/1958/1722/1600/IMGP0246.0.jpg

Offline Vecchiolarry

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 759
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #108 on: February 01, 2008, 07:42:00 AM »
Hello,

Portugal -
Let us give a moment of condolence and reflection to remember this was the day 100 years ago that King Don Carlos and his elder son, Prince Luis Felipe, were assassinated.
The Queen, Amalia, saved her younger son, Manuel, and herself by throwing her bouquet and umbrella at the murderer.
Manuel only reigned for 2 more years before he was overthrown in 1910.

Larry

Offline dmitri

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2018
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #109 on: February 01, 2008, 07:53:33 AM »
Yes this really was a tragedy of epic proportions. The tomb of King Carlos and Prince Luis Felipe depicts the sadness well. Portugal certainly did not benefit by these deaths. The most imposing and very stately statue of King Carlos outside the beautiful Ajuda Palace in Lisbon is a fitting memorial to King Carlos. May he and his family continue to rest in peace.

Offline José

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 638
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #110 on: February 02, 2008, 01:02:23 PM »


Yesterday I was at Cascais at the unveiling of D.Carlos statue .
A very realistic statue of the king facing his beloved bay of Cascais, near the former Royal Citadel Palace at Promenade D.Maria Pia.

The statue was unveiled by President Cavaco Silva with the attendance of HRH the Duke of Bragança.

Later there was a moving cerimony evoking D.Carlos in Terreiro do Paço, on the right spot where the King was murdered.
The Duke and Duchess of Bragança, the Pr. of Beira, the Dukes of Viseu and Coimbra, several Bragança-van Uden attended the cerimony.

At 19.00 there was a mass in S.Vicente de Fora, the Bragança Pantheon, conducted by the Cardinal of Lisbon.
I think I spotted Pss. D.Teresa.

On a sour register:
The jacobin socialist government shone by its absence - a mere undersecretary for tourism in Cascais - , and prohibited the Army Band to play at the event as it had been scheduled and previously authorized, and ordered its faithful not to let pass in parliament a vote of condolence for the King's death.

The republic always so sure of itself ... and so full of itself .

Good for them !!!

Tonight RTP starts "O dia do Regicídio" - the day of the regicide, a compact version of the 6 episodes series.
Yesterday there was a program with the making of of the series.
Looks interesting.

Offline Ilias_of_John

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 431
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #111 on: February 06, 2008, 08:20:02 PM »
On centenary of Portuguese monarch's murder, heir to the throne reopens royal debate
2008-01-31 13:51:52 -

Dom Duarte Pio is a soft-spoken, unassuming 62-year-old who would be king of Portugal.

Dom Duarte Pio would by birthright be sovereign if Portugal restored its monarchy, and he is using public interest in the Friday centenary of King Carlos I's assassination to make his case for a return to royal influence on a continent proud of its democratic traditions.

He claims that at the start of the past century, before republicans deposed King Carlos I's successor - Manuel II - by force in 1910, Portugal packed a bigger economic and diplomatic punch than it does now as one of the European Union's lightweights.

«The conclusion we can draw is that the cause of our decline was the creation of a republic, which destabilized the country. We lost a lot and didn't gain much,» Dom Duarte said in an interview.

Like most other descendants of Europe's once-mighty kings and queens, the heir to the Portuguese throne is nowadays a powerless and largely disregarded spectator of his country's fortunes. Few would argue, though, with his assessment that Portugal has been on the slide.

A hundred years after shots rang out in a Lisbon square at the end of a sunny afternoon, killing the 44-year-old king and his eldest son Prince Luis Filipe as they traveled in an open carriage, Portugal has one of the EU's frailest economies.

Some 2 million Portuguese are classified by the EU as living in poverty, on the minimum wage of about ¤400 (US$590) a month. The inevitable comparison with wealthier EU nations makes the Portuguese downhearted, and there is a mood of disenchantment with politicians who, many feel, have kept Portugal among Europe's poorest countries for generations.

Dom Duarte, whose father was a distant cousin of the heirless Manuel II, reckons he can help with that. He says he doesn't want the absolute power of past monarchs and would cooperate with the elected government by keeping a helpful hand on the country's rudder.

A monarchy can «inspire self-esteem and self-confidence better than republics can,» says Dom Duarte, who has thinning hair, a mustache and friendly eyes. Monarchs «carry a sentimental weight that has a huge influence in public life.

A hundred years ago all but three European states, France, Switzerland, and tiny San Marino, had monarchies. Two world wars changed that. Today, there are 10 constitutional monarchies in Europe: Britain, the Netherlands, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Luxembourg, Spain, Monaco, Liechtenstein and Belgium.
Executive power lies with elected governments, though, and modern monarchs have a limited scope of action. They are as likely to be seen in glossy celebrity magazines as at official functions.

Dom Duarte, however, points to Spain and Belgium, where monarchs are credited with holding their countries together during crises, as evidence of how a sovereign can pay dividends: Spain's Juan Carlos helped snuff out a 1981 coup attempt, and Albert II of Belgium mediated a recent government crisis.
Thanks to public events marking the regicide's centenary, Pio is getting noticed for first time since his glamorous 1995 wedding to a commoner.

Pio's chances of ever sitting on the throne are slim, though. There are no signs his ambition has struck a chord with the Portuguese. The last opinion poll, in 2004, found almost 70 percent of those questioned preferred a republic. The Monarchy Party is tiny and at the last general election where it stood alone, in 2002, it captured just over 1,000 votes.

Portugal's constitution prohibits rule by anything other than democratically elected officials. Portuguese historian and newspaper columnist Rui Ramos, the author of a book on the assassinated king, likens the monarchy debate to «a kind of parlor game, with no real relevance. The country's president already acts as one of the administration's checks and balances, Ramos says.

http://www.pr-inside.com/on-centenary-of-portuguese-monarch-s-murder-r414852.htm
Honour all men.
Love the brotherhood.
Fear God.
Honour the king.
1 Peter 2:17

Offline edtash

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #112 on: March 05, 2008, 12:37:33 PM »
The Duke of Braganza strikes me as a lovely man with a rather cute family. Oh if the Portuguese saw the blessings of monarchy only! Dream, dream, dream!

Eddie

Offline Eurohistory

  • Moderator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 1917
    • View Profile
    • Eurohistory.com
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #113 on: March 07, 2008, 11:22:04 PM »
Oh he is indeed. I have been his guest several times in Portugal, both in Lisbon and at San Pedro da Sintra, where he owns a beautiful estate with a house filled with old family portraits that will make anyone gasp for air.

Arturo
--
Arturo Beéche, Publisher
http://erhj.blogspot.com
European Royal History Journal
Kensington House Books
6300 Kensington Ave.
East Richmond Heights, CA 94805 USA
510/236-1730
books@eurohistory.com
http://www.eurohistory.com

Offline Princess Jil

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 21
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #114 on: March 22, 2008, 08:21:06 AM »
Why were they killed?  Was it political or were they just disliked by people?  I am very interested in this subject.  I can not seem to find anything on the internet that talks about the reasons behind the killings.

Offline edtash

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 42
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #115 on: March 22, 2008, 04:44:30 PM »
A conspiracy to bring the monarchy down.

Eddie

Offline José

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 638
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #116 on: March 24, 2008, 12:32:28 PM »
Why were they killed?  Was it political or were they just disliked by people?  I am very interested in this subject.  I can not seem to find anything on the internet that talks about the reasons behind the killings.


In a nut shell:

Since the constitutionalism regime was established in Portugal in 1834, two parties ruled the country, with the odd military dictatorship in betweens, on a process called "Rotativismo" the Progressist Party and the Regenerator Party.
By the beginning of the 20th century those two parties were still succeeding themselves and throwing one another down sonetimes for petty reasons.
Needless to say that, worried by their individual interests, neither party did anything to improve the conditions of the country.
In 1907 King D.Carlos, in the strict abidance to the Constitution, closed the Parliament (Cortes) and invited João Franco (a dissident from one of the two parties) to govern without parliament for a certain period.
At that time, namely in Lisbon and Oporto, the republican movement was very active if not representative - at the last elections the republicans got 7% of the votes.
But closing the Cortes, D.Carlos faced all sort of oppositions. Not only the republicans and fellow-anarchists but also from the monarchics who no longer had a say on the government of the country and on sharing the profits of power.
This period is often called the João Franco Dictatorship.
Mind you, it has nothing to do with a dictatorship as we understand it today.
Press was completely free and attacked both the governement and the Royal Family with the outmost violence, and the only lack of democracy symptons reside on the closed Cortes.

On January 1908 there was an aborted republican revolt that the government easily controlled.
Then João Franco had the regrettable idea to pass a law condemning the implicated in the coup to be evicted to the african colonies, even to the remote island of Timor (near Australia).

At the end of the month, he went to Vila Viçosa where the RF was on holdays to ask the King to sign the law.
The Queen was very much against and D.Carlos is suppose to have said, when signing the law, that he was signing his death sentence.

On Februray 1st the RF was supposed to return to Lisbon - the King and Queen and the Crown-Prince D.Luis Felipe as the future D.Manuel came a few days earlier.
There were several talks regarding the security measures.
João Franco assured the King that there were no causes for fear as the situation was completely controlled, and the King returned.

At his arrival in Lisbon (by train and then by boat) the King's brother, Infante D.Afonso, had brought the automobile fleet of the Royal House and insisted that the RF should regain the Palace by car.
Induced by João Franco that the situation was calm, the King refused and decided to go on a landau, so that the people could see him, to give a sign of confidence that there nothing to fear, and to stress that he was no coward.

The rest is History.

Two members of an anarchist group A Carbonária were among the crowd expecting the arrival of the King.
A third one, who would turn an important writer and whose recent trnalation to the national pantheon was bitterly critised was awaiting a few blocks further on the way to the palace.
Apparently they were acting without the agrément or even the knowledge of the republican party.
And they shot the royal landau from the back.

João Franco resigned from PM, there were general elections (whose date had been previously marked by J.Franco), the two old parties were in (in)action again and D.Manuel lost the throne two years later...


Offline José

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 638
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #117 on: April 01, 2008, 12:50:32 PM »

Offline Yseult

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 867
  • I Love YaBB 2!
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #118 on: April 02, 2008, 02:10:27 PM »
Anyone has pictures of Amelie as a child? Maybe with her mother...?

Offline KarlandZita

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2587
  • Mama Regina Elena
    • View Profile
Re: King Carlos & Queen Amelie of Portugal
« Reply #119 on: June 29, 2008, 08:55:58 AM »
Queen Marie Amelie in great mourning with her last son Young King Manuel II :



Two photos of the Queen :




Reginei Mama Elena a Romaniei