Author Topic: The Crisis at Spala  (Read 27078 times)

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Offline Natasya

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #30 on: April 25, 2007, 07:27:24 PM »
No, he had no pain killers whatsoever for fear he'd get addicted.
A proof is a proof and when you have a good proof it's because it's prooven.
-Jean Chretien

Alixz

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #31 on: April 25, 2007, 10:06:17 PM »
Perhaps that was because both of his parents were addicted to various "prescription drugs"  and non prescription drugs that were not illegal in Russia at that time.

Cocaine for one.

Laudanum for another.


Offline skitzo12

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #32 on: April 26, 2007, 06:58:23 AM »
yes but cocaine was quite common back then, a suprising amount of now illicit drugs were, actually cocaine was i believe a painkiller.
it's just like opium and many others, i can assure you, one day we will find out that a common ingredient used today is dangerous, addictive, or something else, it always happens, case and points
cigarettes.

Offline Natasya

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #33 on: April 26, 2007, 07:29:26 PM »
Laudanum was also used for pain.
A proof is a proof and when you have a good proof it's because it's prooven.
-Jean Chretien

Offline Sarushka

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #34 on: April 28, 2007, 07:49:44 AM »
I have two more letters from Botkin, which I will post after I have translated them. I also have the two bulletins regarding the heir's health, but they also must be translated from the Russian, so please be patient!

Here are the other two of Botkin's letters, which I promised so long ago:


THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world." ~Greg King

Offline Greenowl

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2007, 01:59:58 PM »
I had never heard anything about the Ukaze (or decree) reportedly written and signed by Nicholas after nearly losing Alexei, that repealed the males only rule of succession and named Olga as Empress-presumptive should Alexei die. Sounds like an excellent idea. In what part of the forum has it previously been discussed? Obviously I would like to learn more about it. 

Equally, I would be grateful for any information about the addiction of Nicholas and Alexandra to various prescription drugs as well as non-prescription drugs that were not illegal in Russia at that time, e.g. cocaine and laudanum. Who was addicted to what and how did they become addicted????

Offline RealAnastasia

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #36 on: April 28, 2007, 07:10:26 PM »
I read somewhere, but I can't remember exactly WHERE, that there are some entries in the Tsar diary where he saids he took a little of cocaine for he was sickly or weak, as if it was the more natural thing of the world. But of course he was not aware of he was becoming adict to a dangerous drug. Cocaina was normally used back then, not only in Russia, but everywhere. I have lots of magazines from Nicholas era, where they promoted beverages, medicines and tonics with cocaina in them. These products where mainly French , English and American...so, cocaina was not forbidden in the first years of the XX Century.

By the way, Pope Leon XIII used to drink some tonic wine with coca in it, believeing it was an excellent medicine. ;D he died without knowing he was an adict to cocaina.

RealAnastasia.

Offline Greenowl

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #37 on: April 30, 2007, 03:52:25 AM »
Thanks for that info! Would it be true to say that Nicholas must have been aware of his addiction if he and Alexandra were afraid that Alexei would also become addicted?

Sorry for digressing, but did Coca Cola originally have cocaine in it? I seem to remember hearing that it had a "secret" ingredient and that it was originally sold as a sort of tonic or "pick-me-up". The name is very suggestive!!

Offline Sarushka

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #38 on: April 30, 2007, 07:57:12 AM »
\Sorry for digressing, but did Coca Cola originally have cocaine in it? I seem to remember hearing that it had a "secret" ingredient and that it was originally sold as a sort of tonic or "pick-me-up". The name is very suggestive!!

True:

http://www.snopes.com/cokelore/cocaine.asp
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world." ~Greg King

Offline Greenowl

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #39 on: April 30, 2007, 08:24:28 AM »
Thanks again Sarushka! The coca-cola legends are most interesting...I had no idea!!

TheAce1918

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #40 on: April 30, 2007, 09:43:52 PM »
Yep, the Coca-Cola legends with Coke are very popular.  The Cocain legends even extend to Hollywood because many actors and actresses up until I believe as late as the 1950's would use the drug.  In the 1920s it was a fad, and afterwards, it either became the addictive substance or remained the fad until federal suits were brought up.

Offline Raegan

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #41 on: May 04, 2007, 02:30:49 PM »
No, he had no pain killers whatsoever for fear he'd get addicted.

Where did you read this?

Offline Natasya

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #42 on: May 04, 2007, 08:05:48 PM »
In Massie's Nicholas and Alexandra, I'm pretty sure it was this book. "Morphine was not given to him because of it's known destructive habits" or something like that.
I've also heard other things about other drugs, though I can't remember where.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2007, 08:07:55 PM by Natasya »
A proof is a proof and when you have a good proof it's because it's prooven.
-Jean Chretien

Offline Sarushka

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #43 on: May 05, 2007, 08:00:12 AM »
Massie does write on page 173 of my edition of Nicholas and Alexandra:
"The bleeding could not be stopped and no pain-killers were given."

However, this remark is in reference to the Spala incident, and shouldn't be taken to mean Aleksei was never ever given painkillers.


I believe I've also read in Massie that Aleksei was never given morphine, but I haven't found the reference yet.
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world." ~Greg King

Offline Raegan

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Re: The Crisis at Spala
« Reply #44 on: May 08, 2007, 08:26:37 AM »
I will have to check my copy later today when I get a chance. I know that from my GARF notes, Olga wrote in her diary on January 30, 1917 Alexei was injected with 1/2 syringe of morphine.