Author Topic: Spanish Habsburg Queens  (Read 113270 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

umigon

  • Guest
Spanish Habsburg Queens
« on: May 05, 2005, 03:49:12 PM »
8. Isabelle of Bourbon (1603-1644): She was one of the daughters born to King Henry IV of France and his second wife, Marie de' Medici. She married future Philip IV in 1615, although their marriage would not be consummated until 1620. In 1621 she became Queen of Spain after her husband succeeded his father. She was beautiful, charming, intelligent and witty, but despite these facts, Philip was constantly unfaithful to her, something that made Isabelle suffer quite a lot. During her last years she opposed Philip's favorite, the Conde-Duque de Olivares, until he was dismissed in 1643. Isabel would die a year later, after having had ten pregnancies:

- Margarita Maria (1621-1621).
- Margarita María Catalina (1623-1623).
- María Eugenia (1625-1627).
- A miscarried girl (1626).
- Isabel María Teresa (1627-1627).
- Baltasar Carlos (1629-1646). Who was Prince of the Asturias but died very young.
- María Antonia Dominica Jacinta (1635-1637).
- María Teresa (1638-1683), who became Queen of France by marrying her cousin Louis XIV (1638-1715) in 1660.
- A miscarried girl (1640).
- A miscarried boy (1644).

9. Mariana of Austria (1634-1696): Born to Emperor Ferdinand III and Mary of Spain, she had been engaged to Prince Baltasar Carlos since she was two years old. When Baltasar died in 1646, she was chosen by her uncle Philip IV to be his second wife, as he had lost his wife two years earlier and his only son just a couple of months before. A marriage by proxy was held in 1648, but Mariana wouldn't arrive in Spain until late 1649, when she was properly married to her uncle Philip. He was 44 at the time, while Mariana was not yet 15. Although a happy couple for a while, Philip's constant infidelities and Mariana's everyday-growing bad temper made the marriage an unhappy one, in which the King and Queen only seemed to agree in one point: the making of babies:

- Margarita María Teresa (1651-1673), who married her uncle-cousin Emperor Leopold I (1640-1705) in 1666.
- María Ambrosia de la Concepción (1655-1655), an epyleptic who died with just 15 days of age.
- A daughter that just survived 10 hours (1656).
- Felipe Próspero (1657-1661).
- Fernando Tomás (1658-1659).
- Charles II (1661-1700), who became the heir to the throne.

After Philip IV's death Mariana became Queen Regent during the minority of Charles II. Although this Regency should have ended in 1675, Mariana continued to over influence her mentally retarded son all through her life. She died in 1696, of breast cancer, four years before her son's death.

10. María Luisa of Orleans (1662-1689): Daughter of the homosexual Philip of France and of the hysterical and witty Henrietta Anne Stuart, María Luisa would marry Charles II in 1679. Charles would love her with all his sick heart and she would end up feeling some type of affection for him. Accused of the couple's lack of heirs, she was forced to drink many weird potions that caused her the appendicitis that finally killed her.

11. Maria Anna of Neoburg (1667-1740): She had been born to the Elector of Neoburg, Philip Wilhelm Wittelsbach and to his second wife, Elisabeth Amalia of Hesse-Darmstadt. She was chosen as a wife for Charles II because her parents had produced 23 children and she was expected to do the same. Unlike María Luisa, she never resigned to her fate and she used her sick and mentally retarded husband as much as she liked, even inventing she was pregnant in order to gain more influences over Charles. She got to invent 12 different pregnancies!! She was a corrupt woman who never felt any type of compassion for the King until his last days, when she wouldn't separate from the dying king's bedside. Once Charles was dead she tried to make her nephew Charles of Austria (future Emperor Charles VI) the new king. But the new king of Spain, Philip V, arrived in Madrid before Charles and forced the Queen Dowager to abandon the Spanish capital. After living in Toledo for a while, Maria Anna would be expelled from Spain and ended up living in Bayonne, under Louis XIV's vigilance. She would return to Spain in 1739, but not being allowed to return to Madrid, she died in Guadalajara a year later. It was gossiped that during her exile years she secretly married one Jean de Larrétéguy, by whom she supposedly had some children.


Well I hope you have enjoyed reading this HUGE text if you didn't end up confused by so many names and family relations. Sorry if my English is, at times, very ''Spanglish'', hehe! Ah! and sorry about the translation of names, don't know if they are absolutely correct or if in English you just leave them as they are in the source language. Any doubt or problem, please ask!

umigon

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2005, 01:29:18 PM »


Philip IV of Spain also had many mistresses and bastards. He fathered a total of 30 illegitimate children, but I only have information about some of them:

1. Margarita de Austria (1625-1650), born to Philip and a young woman from Madrid whose name is unknown. She was a nun since 1641 in the Descalzas Reales Convent in Madrid.

2. Francisco Fernando Isidro de Austria (1626-1634), born to Philip and María de Chirel (1607-1626). He died being a little boy and he was posthumously recognized, as he was buried in El Escorial Monastery.

3. Juan José de Austria (1629-1679), born to Philip and one of his favourite lovers, the actress María Inés Calderón y Velasco (1611-1676), ''La Calderona''. Juan José was Viceroy of Cataluña and Naples and some kind of ''Primer Minister'' in Spain during Charles II's (his half-brother) reign (1677-1679). He had three illegitimate daughters, all of them nuns and died without offspring.

4. Domingo de San Cristóbal (1631-1683), born to Philip and a woman from Calahorra whose name is unknown. He was an Agustinian monk since 1649.

5. Alfonso Enríquez de Santo Tomás (1634-1692), born to Philip and Tomasa Aldana (1617-1676). He was Bishop of Osma (1653-1692), Plasencia (1657-1692) and Málaga (1664-1692).

6. Juan Cossío del Sacramento (1640-1701), born to Philip and Teresa Aldana (1620-1664), who was sister of another of Philip's mistresses. Juan was an Agustinian monk since 1655.

7. A son named Carlos whose fate and mother are unknown.

8. Alonso Antonio de San Martín (1636-1708), born to Philip and Mariana Pérez de Cuevas. Monk since 1650, Bishop of Oviedo (1656-1664) and Bishop of Cuenca (1664-1708).

9. Fernando Valdés y de Uribeondo (1638-1702), born to Philip and Ana María de Uribeondo (1620-1703). Governor of Novara since 1661, he married Anna Maria di Capece (1642-1685) in 1660. I don't know if they ever had children.

10. Ana Margarita de Austria (1641-1699), born to Philip and Margarita del Escala (1625-1699). She was a nun since 1656.


As I have said Philip had another 20 illegitimate children, but I have no information about them!

Prince_Leo_Teles

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2005, 07:09:11 AM »
Is amazing that almost all the ilegitimate children of King Philip were put in a religious order as nuns or bishops, etc....

maybe they did that so they couldnt produce offspring and continue the ilegimate line

Paul

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2005, 01:17:27 PM »
Quote
Is amazing that almost all the ilegitimate children of King Philip were put in a religious order as nuns or bishops, etc....

maybe they did that so they couldnt produce offspring and continue the ilegimate line


It was more economical than creating numerous dukedoms & doweries. Also, it may have been Felipe's way of exorcising any guilt accumulated by his adulteries. Several of his mistresses were packed off to become unwilling Brides of Christ.

umigon

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2005, 11:42:12 AM »
yes, even '' La Calderona'' who had been the lover of an actor, a friar and the duke of Medina de las Torres before her affair with King Philip (when she was seventeen!) managed to be Abbess at the convent where she lived since 1630.

The Aldana sisters were made nuns also, Ana de Uribeondo gave her husband's name to the son she bore to the king and of the other I know nothing.

umigon

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2005, 11:51:14 AM »
I also read once, although I don't know where or when, that ''La Calderona'' was a young widow when she met the King and that she had a little daughter from that marriage, Luisa de Osorio, who supposedly entered the convent with her mother in 1630.

But as I can't remember where I read it, take it as if it was a hypothesis rather than a fact.

umigon

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2005, 12:34:01 PM »


As I wrote about Joan the Mad the last time, I would like to write now about one of my favourites, the beautiful Isabel of Portugal, wife of Charles I and V.


Isabel was born the 23 October 1503 in Lisboa. She was the second child (first daughter) of King Manuel I and his second wife, infanta María of Aragon, a younger sister of Juana la Loca. King Manuel had previously been married to the eldest daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, Princess Isabel, but their only child, Miguel, died aged 2. King Manuel and his beloved second wife, María, had many children: Juan, who would succeed his father as Juan III; Isabel, who would marry Charles V; Beatriz, who would marry the duke of Savoy; Luis, who would die unmarried; Fernando, who would die very young; Alfonso, who was Cardinal and also died young; Enrique, also a Cardinal who would become King of Portugal in 1578; María, who died being a baby; Eduardo, whose descendants perpetuated the Royal line; and Antonio, who died short after being born.

Isabel's infancy was quite a happy one, as Portugal was a growing country in those times and her parents were an example of marital faithfulness. Her education, personally managed by her mother, was wide, including History and Music and, as usual, a lot of Religion. Queen María was very keen on her children being extremely influenced by religion. (I suppose all of Isabella's children thought in the same way, going even beyond their contemporary fellow Catholic kings and queens).

When Queen María died in 1517 Isabel and her siblings were devastated and Manuel was heartbroken and desperate. Isabel and her sister Beatriz acted like some sort of adoptive mothers for their younger brothers. A year later their father remarried. His new wife, Leonor of Austria, was Isabel's polite and charming cousin. Leonor became another fairy godmother to the small orphans.

After Manuel's death in 1521, Leonor and Isabel continued to bring up the King's children until Leonor's return to Spain, a few months afterwards. Beatriz had already been married to the Duke of Savoy and King Juan III was looking for a convenient husband for his favourite sister, Isabel, of whom he said that she was "the most rare and precious of jewels". In 1525 their cousin Carlos I of Spain and V of Germany broke his betrothal to Mary Tudor, Princess of Wales, and negotations for a marriage between Carlos and Isabel began.

They were married the 11th March 1526 in Seville's Cathedral, and they spent their honeymoon in Granada. They fell in love with each other almost immediately, something quite unusual within Royalty of those times. Isabel was pregnant soon afterwards and she would give Carlos a total of seven children:

1. Felipe (1527-1598 ): He would succeed his father as Felipe II.

2. María (1528-1603): She would marry her cousin archduke Maximilian in 1548. They would become Holy Roman Emperors in 1564.

3. Fernando (1529-1530).

4. A stillborn son in 1534.

5. Juana (1535-1573): She would marry her cousin Prince Juan Manuel of Portugal in 1552. They had an only son, Sebastian, born after his father's death, who would become King of Portugal.

6. Juan (1537-1538 ).

7. A son who died soon after his birth in 1539.

Isabel was a virtuous and good woman through all her life and her faithfulness and absolut desperation when Carlos had to travel out of Spain is totally proved, although many slanderous ''historians'' have written, without ANY proof, that Isabel had several affairs, including the painter Tizziano as one of them! She was blonde and her eyes were bluish green. She danced perfectly well and she was an intelligent and quick woman. She was one of Spain's greatest Regents, a job she did brilliantly in several times and for long periods, as Carlos was constantly travelling to his many states.

Isabel only had a spot: she was a fervorous and fanatic Catholic, but, of course, we can't judge her actions and feelings about this with our modern minds. It would be unfair.

When Isabel died soon after giving birth to her last child, Carlos and all his realm were shattered.

cantacuzene

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2005, 05:11:43 AM »
Was the mysterious María Luisa de Orleans a secret agent of her uncle Louis XIV? Was she poisoned? Frivolous, coquette, capricieuse. She liked eating too much and often she got ill of eating too much figs.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2010, 01:01:26 AM by trentk80 »

umigon

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2005, 06:27:12 AM »
María Luisa resigned to her fate and ended "loving" in some way her husband. She was not poisoned, she died of appendicitis.

A spy for her uncle Louis XIV? Well, it could be, although we know that Maria Louisa finally learnt to love Spain and her last years were happier than the first ones...
« Last Edit: November 21, 2010, 01:02:01 AM by trentk80 »

cantacuzene

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2005, 06:42:38 AM »
Thank you Umigon. We could add she felt down from a horse. and yes, there was a love affair, it seems , between Louis XIV and Henriette d'angleterre. they both, mother and daughter died in similar circonstances.
the one at 30, the other at 28. Descended from Stuarts, they were very important because of  jacobite claims against hanoverians. this claims passed to anne Marie, their daughter and sister, who married in Savoy. Marie louise was not a political woman, that's for Mariana of Habsburg tolered her quite well. Not the same as M. of Neuburg, her opposed side as woman and as queen consort.


Umigon, I think the b/w portraits of M. de Neuburg, where she is quite idealized are from a very old book from a collection wich has several volumes and has portraits quite unusual. Have you got it? Am I right?
« Last Edit: November 21, 2010, 01:08:19 AM by trentk80 »

umigon

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2005, 07:22:13 AM »

All the images I have come from many books, but I have no books that specifically contain images. I buy biographies, which usually tend to have images in them.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2010, 01:07:53 AM by trentk80 »

Offline Eurohistory

  • Moderator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 1916
    • View Profile
    • Eurohistory.com
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2005, 09:02:12 AM »
Archduchess Catharina of Austria published, earlier this year, a book about Spain Habsburg queens...rather interesting!

Arturo Beéche
--
Arturo Beéche, Publisher
http://erhj.blogspot.com
European Royal History Journal
Kensington House Books
6300 Kensington Ave.
East Richmond Heights, CA 94805 USA
510/236-1730
books@eurohistory.com
http://www.eurohistory.com

cantacuzene

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2005, 05:10:37 AM »
One very ancient was just Maximilian the emperor (XV c.)
Important jaw!But dont forget it's all the same. Bourbons have Hbs ancestors (a lot) and so Hbs married Bourb. For example, this Isabelle is a Bourbon, her mother was Medici and her grandma Habsburg

Grand_Duke

  • Guest
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2005, 06:22:30 PM »
Quote
All of the Hapsburg family have big lips and a long jaw I wonder which ancestor they all inherited that look from :-/


Cymburgis of Masovia, Piast princess through whom the condition was brought into the Habsburg family. As the mother of Emperor Frederick III she became the ancestor of all later Habsburgs, as only his line of the family survived.
The famous Habsburg lip was a particular physical characteristic of most members of the family for many generations until the 18th century.  It can even be recognized in some of her distant descendants today, yet not quite as strongly.

Offline trentk80

  • Moderator
  • Boyar
  • *****
  • Posts: 209
    • View Profile
Re: Spanish Habsburg Queens
« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2005, 12:00:31 PM »
Quote
I wonder why the family also married their uncles and nieces that sounds near to incest no wonder some of them had something wrong with them

Wasn't Marghareta of Austria also the aunt of her husband Philip III?


Margarita of Austria was not Philip's aunt, but his cousin. Their respective grandparents, Emperor Ferdinand I and Emperor Charles V were brothers.

Maybe you're confusing King Philip III's wife with another Margarita of Austria, who was indeed Philip III's aunt. She was the youngest sister of the King's mother, Anne of Austria, and was a nun in Madrid.

Why did the family members marry among them? It wasn't for pleasure or love, but for political reasons. They wanted to keep their inheritance from rival dynasties (Bourbons, etc), so they began to intermarry more and more frequently among themselves. It's ironic that eventually this inbreeding brought the extinction of the male line of the Habsburgs and their inheritance passed to the Bourbons, which was what the Habsburgs feared and wanted to avoid!
Ladran los perros a la Luna, y ella con majestuoso desprecio prosigue el curso de su viaje.