Author Topic: Jeweled Crescent pins  (Read 18016 times)

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Offline Martyn

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2005, 07:12:52 PM »
And another......

The Marquise d'Hervey Saint-Denys as Diana the huntress by Raimundo de Madrazo y Garreta, 1888....



This is a fancy dress costume as opposed to the  fashionable toilette of the preceeding portrait.  The Marquise has chosen to have herself immortalised as the goddess Diana, complete with bow and arrow and the requisite crescent, the emblem of the hunting goddess.

As usual, this costume contains many elements of fashionable dress; the fact that the crescent is composed of diamonds gives us a sttrong clue as to the popularity of this motif for jewellery at this period.........
'For a galant spirit there can never be defeat'....Wallis Windsor

'The important things is not what they think of me, but what I think of them.'......QV

Offline Robert_Hall

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #16 on: July 25, 2005, 07:26:58 PM »
OK, and just what was she supposed to be hunting ?
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cantacuzene

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2005, 05:46:05 AM »
I would add that the crescents in hair were rery commom in the end XVIII c. and first XIX. I remember the queen of Etruria, Maria Teresa, in the family portrait of 1800 (El Prado) with an identic crescent of diamonds. Other royals in this portrait have arrows, not crescents.
The idea inspiration comes probably from the innumerable representations of Diana( i mean the Godess) Diana of Poitiers in the XVI c. used jewels in shape of crescent. I have a portrait of her with one on her head. Nattier too represented a lot lot of marquises, comtesses..  with these crescents. although almost all are disguised as mythologicals, these of the royal family of Charles IV XVIII-XIX are true parures. I suppose it would be possible a few were inherited or adapted.

Offline Martyn

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2005, 07:55:18 AM »
Thank you very much for that information Cantacuzene.

Of course the crescent moon has always been identified with the Goddess of the Hunt, Diana.

The vogue for these motifs may well have existed from earlier times; most of the surviving examples of jewellery in this form, and for that matter in the form of arrows and stars tends to date from the middle to end of the 19th century, when the goût for this tyep of jewellery was extremely fashionable.....

However. jewelled hair ornaments really came into vogue in that late 1600's when large frizzed hairstyles became fashionable at the European courts; in portraits of that period (1580 to about 1620) one sees all manner of jewelled ornaments nestling in fashionable coiffures.....
'For a galant spirit there can never be defeat'....Wallis Windsor

'The important things is not what they think of me, but what I think of them.'......QV

Offline Martyn

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #19 on: July 28, 2005, 07:56:38 AM »
Quote
OK, and just what was she supposed to be hunting ?



Goodness knows?  A lover perhaps?  ;)
'For a galant spirit there can never be defeat'....Wallis Windsor

'The important things is not what they think of me, but what I think of them.'......QV

Offline lancashireladandre

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #20 on: October 20, 2005, 06:57:45 AM »
I have seen pictures of both Ella ( GD Serge) and Militza ( GD Peter)  wearing crescents, but unfortuntely have no copies. Also Arch Duchess Marie Josepha (daughter of the King of Saxony & mother of the last Austrian Emperor). They were mainly to be worn on less grand occassions than required a tiara as remembered by Consuelo Vanderbilt Balsan in her memoirs" The Glitter and the Gold". In popularity they seem to have come second only to stars.My mother owns a pretty sapphire and diamond example and one can see the original fittings where it could be adapted for wearing in the hair or as a pendant. The victorian workmanship is excellent...far superior to most of today's craftsmen

Offline Tasha_R

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #21 on: October 20, 2005, 10:42:04 AM »
Would it be possible to post a picture of it?  It would be lovely to see one up close.

Tasha

p.s. I understand if you would rather not

Offline lancashireladandre

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #22 on: October 20, 2005, 02:58:57 PM »
Sorry at the moment my scanner is on the blink.But I will see what I can do.

Offline Martyn

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #23 on: October 21, 2005, 07:46:10 AM »
Consuelo, Duchess of Marlborough foolishly thought that she could get away with wearing her diamond crescent as a hair ornament in place of a tiara, at a dinner attended by Bertie, Prince of Wales.

He took her to task for her failure to be appropriately bejewelled, stating the example of Alix, who had taken the trouble to wear one (of course).  Consuelo was obliged to make up an excuse involving her not being able to get to the bank in time to get her tiara.....

I must say that stars and crescents really make the most attractive hair ornaments and make a nice change from tiaras......
'For a galant spirit there can never be defeat'....Wallis Windsor

'The important things is not what they think of me, but what I think of them.'......QV

Offline elfwine

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #24 on: October 23, 2005, 08:10:48 PM »
Quote
Consuelo, Duchess of Marlborough foolishly thought that she could get away with wearing her diamond crescent as a hair ornament in place of a tiara, at a dinner attended by Bertie, Prince of Wales.

He took her to task for her failure to be appropriately bejewelled, stating the example of Alix, who had taken the trouble to wear one (of course).  Consuelo was obliged to make up an excuse involving her not being able to get to the bank in time to get her tiara.....

I must say that stars and crescents really make the most attractive hair ornaments and make a nice change from tiaras......


    What were the rules of Etiquette regarding when and where to wear certain jewels? Were tiaras only for formal occasions or evening out? What exactly composed a 'tiara' - was it simply a 'small crown' or was it more complicated than that? How much jewelry was thought 'too much'?
Was this ever agreed upon or was it a great court secret?

elf

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Offline lancashireladandre

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #25 on: October 26, 2005, 02:21:49 PM »
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     What were the rules of Etiquette regarding when and where to wear certain jewels? Were tiaras only for formal occasions or evening out? What exactly composed a 'tiara' - was it simply a 'small crown' or was it more complicated than that? How much jewelry was thought 'too much'?
Was this ever agreed upon or was it a great court secret?

elf

Ladies certainly were not supposed to wear a tiara at any function held in a hotel.Have no idea why....

Offline Martyn

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #26 on: October 27, 2005, 06:23:54 AM »
Quote

     What were the rules of Etiquette regarding when and where to wear certain jewels? Were tiaras only for formal occasions or evening out? What exactly composed a 'tiara' - was it simply a 'small crown' or was it more complicated than that? How much jewelry was thought 'too much'?
Was this ever agreed upon or was it a great court secret?

elf



At the English court, tiaras were de rigueur for matrons and debutantes alike.

Court balls, State banquets all required the wearing of such a jewel.  Entertaining that involved royalty, even dinners in private houses, usually necessitated the wearing of a tiara, if the guest possessed one or could borrow one.

Maybe in the country, less worn........
'For a galant spirit there can never be defeat'....Wallis Windsor

'The important things is not what they think of me, but what I think of them.'......QV

Offline Martyn

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #27 on: October 27, 2005, 06:24:33 AM »
Quote
Ladies certainly were not supposed to wear a tiara at any function held in a hotel.Have no idea why....


Interesting.  I have heard that and equally have no idea why that should be the case.....
'For a galant spirit there can never be defeat'....Wallis Windsor

'The important things is not what they think of me, but what I think of them.'......QV

Offline Tasha_R

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2005, 09:28:04 AM »
I hate getting older... I can't seem to remember anything anymore!  Somewhere deep in my memories is something I read about the Waldorf Astoria, a hotel in New York City, where once this rule was broken and tiaras were worn, to the shock of many.

Does that ring any bells to anyone?
Tasha

Offline lancashireladandre

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Re: Jeweled Crescent pins
« Reply #29 on: October 30, 2005, 02:44:13 AM »
There are several antique crescents coming up in jewelry sales in London being held by Christies(www.Christies.com) and Bonhams(www.Bonhams.com) in November.If anyone is interested on perusing the on line catalogues