Author Topic: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)  (Read 51598 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Nadya_Arapov

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 470
    • View Profile
Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« on: May 29, 2004, 04:21:29 AM »
Yes, Voeikov escaped. He was arrested in 1917 but released at which point he and Nini fled to the Crimea. They left Russia in 1919, going first to Romania, before settling in Finland near Nini's father. He died in 1947 at the age of 79.

Offline Nadya_Arapov

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 470
    • View Profile
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2004, 01:12:21 AM »
Yes, Fredericks/Freedericksz did eventually escape. He remained in St. Petersburg for some time after the Revolution. His wife Hedwige/Jadwiga (b. 1838 ) died there on 5 Oct 1919. I'm not sure if you were aware of this but she was married once before to a M. Ciecholewski. I don't believe there were any children from her first marriage. Anyway, Fredericks left Russia for Finland in 1924. He died in Grankula, Finland 1 July 1927. He was born in 1838.

I also discovered something new. Nini and her husband Voeikov apparently left Finland at some point and moved to Sweden. According to Timothy Boettger that is where they both died.

Countess Eugenia Fredericks b. Paris, France 8 May 1867 d. Djursholm, Sweden 29 Dec 1950 m. 1895 Vladimir Voeikov b. 14 Aug 1868 d. Danderyd, Sweden 8 Oct 1947

Countess Emma Fredericks b. Paris, France 11 Nov 1869 d. Stockholm, Sweden 20 Feb 1945 She never married.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Nadya_Arapov »

Offline Daniel Briere

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 340
    • View Profile
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2004, 10:00:05 AM »
Joanna, did you know Major General Voeikov wrote his memoirs? They were published (in old Russian alphabet) in Helsinki in 1936 : « S tsarem i bez tsaria : vospominaniia poslednego Dvortsovogo Komendanta Gosudaria Imperatora Nikolaia II V.N. Voeikova » (approximate translation : « With (a/the) tsar and without (a/the) tsar; memoirs of the last Palace Commandant of  Sovereign Emperor Nicholas II V.N. Voeikov »). After the February Revolution he mentions his city appartment (in Petrograd) « on the Moika near Pevchevsky Bridge » (close to Palace Square). I don’t know where he lived in Tsarskoe Selo. Before he was chosen as Palace Commandant (on December 24, 1913…nice Christmas gift!!) he was the Commanding Officer of His Majesty’s Guards Hussar Regiment and writes that he was living in the Commandant’s house in Sofia (south part of Tsarskoe Selo, where the regiment was garrisoned).  Then he certainly moved to other quarters and lived near the Palace (he may even have some rooms there as Palace Commandant – Bob would probably know).

His memoirs were reprinted at least twice in Russia (1994, 1995) but, to my knowledge, haven’t yet been translated. Maybe an interesting project for Atlantis Magazine?

Daniel Briere

Offline Forum Admin

  • Administrator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 4665
  • www.alexanderpalace.org
    • View Profile
    • Alexander Palace Time Machine
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2004, 10:03:45 AM »
For anyone interested in Count Freedericks, we will be putting up the translation of his Interrogation while imprisoned in 1918, for the June Newsletter.  Forum readers can have a sneak preview here:
http://www.alexanderpalace.org/palace/interfreed.html

Offline Antonio_P.Caballer

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 533
    • View Profile
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2004, 01:31:26 PM »
I´m quite confussed about Voeikov´s wife. Gleb Botkin wrote about him and said that he scaped to Finland leaving behind(without any regret) his wife, daughter of Fredericks, that was "a hunchback and almost a total invalid". In fact he wrote that this was the reason why Fredericks remained in Petersburg, for his daughter was unable to escape.
In addition, Gleb described Voeikov as a parvenue, ridiculous person, that only cared for taking advantage of his position as son-in-law to Fredericks, and making two or three million rubles of a supposed radioactive water he found in his state. Then sold it taclessly to a chain of rairoad-station restaurants, a thing he could only do because of his official position.

who was then Voeikov´s wife? Emma or Eugenie?

Offline Penny_Wilson

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 107
    • View Profile
    • kingandwilson
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2004, 01:32:01 PM »
Quote
His memoirs were reprinted at least twice in Russia (1994, 1995) but, to my knowledge, haven’t yet been translated. Maybe an interesting project for Atlantis Magazine?


Hi Daniel!

Sorry I missed this post until now... But this book, "With the Tsar and Without Him" -- as we call it -- is already being translated with a view towards publishing it in English, completely annotated, under the Atlantis imprint.

We are translating it with the assistance of a Russian woman in St Petersburg because of the "old Russian" type-setting that was used.  It was a bit beyond my capabilities, and we have a marvellous benefactrix who hooked us up with a good translator.

Once the translating is complete, Greg and I will have to accomplish the annotating -- which we rather enjoy doing, as both of us love long footnotes in books!  

So the publication date is still very much up in the air, and of course, we have no idea at all of the price.  That will be determined by the size of the print run, which will in turn depend on the amount of interest.  We don't like the idea of pre-orders; we like people to pay-as-they-go -- but we will at some point, as the project nears completion, be doing a bit of advertizing in order to compile a waiting list.

For Joanna:  There are unfortunately no photos in this book, but it IS a densely written (small type) 300 pages -- and hopefully it's full of new information and details!

Penny
"Don't do anything by half. If you love someone, love them with all your soul. When you go to work, work your ass off. When you hate someone, hate them until it hurts."  -- A Piece of Good Advice

Sometimes the truth hurts. And sometimes it feels real good. -- Henry Rollins

Offline Mike

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1326
    • View Profile
    • Erast Fandorin Museum
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2004, 10:58:21 AM »
I'm looking for a good picture of Count Vladimir Freedericksz from the period when he was Minister of Court, i.e. 1900s - 1910s. He often appears alongside the imperial family on the photos of ceremonies etc., but I need a portrait or a close-up image.  

Offline Daniel Briere

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 340
    • View Profile
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2004, 12:58:10 PM »
Hi Mike,

Head of the Court Chancery Mossolov has a photo of his former boss in his Memoirs , at least in the English edition ( At the Court of the Last Tsar, London, 1935, reprinted in 1996, p 102). He looks younger though. A very good photo of an older Count Freedericksz can be found in Russian Court Memoirs, 1914-16, London, 1917, facing p.38 ).
Daniel Briere

Offline Mike

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1326
    • View Profile
    • Erast Fandorin Museum
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2004, 01:45:54 PM »
Thanks Daniel. I only have a Russian edition of Mossolov, which is very poorly illustrated. Is it possible to scan the photo from the second book? No commercial use solemnly promised! 8)

Offline Daniel Briere

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 340
    • View Profile
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2004, 02:07:44 PM »
Unfortunately I don't yet have a scanner... :-[ but will soon. If you urgently need it, maybe someone else has a photo.
Daniel Briere

elisa_1872

  • Guest
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2004, 06:51:56 AM »
Hi! There is a photo of the Count on http://www.geocities.com/tfboettger/gallery/fred.htm

Do hope you can send the other pictures too though :)

Best wishes

Offline Mike

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1326
    • View Profile
    • Erast Fandorin Museum
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2004, 08:46:53 AM »
Yes I've found this picture, but it probably belongs to the 1890s or early 1900s: he doesn't look an "old gentleman" as Alix used to call him. However Daniel has already sent me another one, from the later period.

Offline Forum Admin

  • Administrator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 4665
  • www.alexanderpalace.org
    • View Profile
    • Alexander Palace Time Machine
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2004, 05:33:18 PM »
Mike,
check out my page on the interrogation of Freedericks:
http://www.alexanderpalace.org/palace/interfreed.html

Offline Mike

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1326
    • View Profile
    • Erast Fandorin Museum
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2004, 03:06:21 AM »
Thanks Rob, it's quite interesting. I've read a Russian summary of this protocol, but never the complete text.

Offline Joanna

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 1309
  • Winter Palace Research
    • View Profile
    • Winter Palace Research
Re: Count Wladimir Freedericksz (1838-1927)
« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2004, 09:17:57 PM »
I received today a book "Before the Revolution St. Petersburg in Photographs 1890-1914" by Mikhail P.Iroshnikov, etc., Abrams, NY; Nauka Publishers,  Leningrad; 1991. On page 201 is a photograph of "... the mansion of Baron V. B. Fredericks. 23 Konnogvardeisky Lane. 1908..." From memoirs I had understood that Count Fredericks lived in an appartment of a building facing the Field of Mars. There are descriptions of meetings with him in his study and where he turns facing the window watching the guards parading. The Countess had wanted to move to the larger premises that were automatically assigned to his positon by the Imperial Court to have the ability to entertain more lavishly but the Count had replied that if/when he ever lost his position then they would not have to move again. His mansion was one of the first to be invaded at the beginning of the revolution and I read in Count Grabbe's book that he gave his appartment to the Fredericks' until they were able to leave through Finland. Does anyone know if this address 23 Konnogvardeisky Lane is facing the Field of Mars? And did the mansion survive?

Joanna