Author Topic: Anna Feodorovna  (Read 59818 times)

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Offline CountessKate

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #45 on: September 29, 2009, 07:07:50 AM »
It was really ridiculous to expect these really young people - Juliane 13 and Constantine 15 - to fall genuinely in love and have a genuine relationship without any real knowledge of what they were getting into.  Naturally Constantine, not the most mature boy, picked the prettiest and liveliest sister, and no doubt Juliane was flattered to be chosen and take a high place at court.  The Empress Catherine had a dreadful mixture of sentimentality and ruthlessness in her desire to get the two heirs to the throne married off and producing offspring, and at the same time sighing over how much in love the couples were.  No wonder it all ended in tears, though at least Alexander and Elizabeth managed to come to a good understanding before he died.  No such luck for Constantine and Juliane/Anna, sadly.

Violetta, these are fascinating letters - where do they come from?

Offline violetta

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #46 on: September 29, 2009, 07:27:20 AM »
they come from a book by Larisa Vasilyeva ZHENA I MUZA ( a wife and a muse) dealing with Elizaveta Alexeevna both as a spouse of Alexander I and Pushkin`s muse. The book is based mainly on her letters to her mother, Amelia of Baden, nee Hesse-Darmstadt. The first part is about Elizaveta Alexeevna as a Tsaritsa - a fascinating story of a young girl who turned into a fascinating, intelligent, sensitive, sensible woman, a patron of fine arts and literature. she longed for love so much!  the second part deals with elizaveta alexeevna as a muse of alexander pushkin, the author claims that she was the only great love of pushkin but she has no evidence,only assumptions based on her own speculations.so personally i don`t believe in these assumptions.

Offline ivanushka

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #47 on: September 29, 2009, 10:21:55 AM »
Violetta, thank you so much for posting the extracts from Elizabeth's letters.  I found them absolutely fascinating.  It's also extraordinary that when Elizabeth/Louise and her sister Frederika first came to St Petersburg they came without their mother.  They were only 13 and 11 at the time!  How frightening it must have been for them. 

I'm glad that Elizabeth and Juliana hit it off so well.  It's a shame Juliana didn't stay longer in Russia, but then, Constantine does sound like a nightmare as a husband!

Offline violetta

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #48 on: September 29, 2009, 11:00:11 AM »
Violetta, thank you so much for posting the extracts from Elizabeth's letters.  I found them absolutely fascinating.  It's also extraordinary that when Elizabeth/Louise and her sister Frederika first came to St Petersburg they came without their mother.  They were only 13 and 11 at the time!  How frightening it must have been for them. 

I'm glad that Elizabeth and Juliana hit it off so well.  It's a shame Juliana didn't stay longer in Russia, but then, Constantine does sound like a nightmare as a husband!

in fact, it was catherine II who openly ordered her envoy to take the baden girls WITHOUT their mother. it was done on purpose, in accordance with catherine`s requirements. no member of the baden family was present either at the engagement or at the wedding ceremony

Offline CountessKate

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #49 on: September 29, 2009, 11:24:18 AM »
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in fact, it was catherine II who openly ordered her envoy to take the baden girls WITHOUT their mother. it was done on purpose, in accordance with catherine`s requirements. no member of the baden family was present either at the engagement or at the wedding ceremony

The Grand Duchess of Baden was born Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt, the sister of Wilhelmina who had been the Grand Duke Paul's first wife.  It might have been thought embarassing if she had come along, as Wilhelmina had died under something of a cloud, and Catherine had done her best to encourage her son to forget his first wife by blackening her name.  She wouldn't want Amelie there to remind her of an uncomfortable time for the family.

Offline Janet Ashton

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #50 on: October 02, 2009, 01:15:54 PM »
  It's a shame Juliana didn't stay longer in Russia, but then, Constantine does sound like a nightmare as a husband!

To be fair, he was perfectly decent husband to his second wife, and also a kindly and sensitive elder brother (and loyal younger one). At the time of his marriage to Anna he was far too young - as was she. There was a period of rapprochement mid-marriage when they got on well, but because of this he was blamed for "coarsening" her by those at court (apparently because she associated with his army friends). As K was criticized by men for being rough, so Anna was effectively called an airhead by older women....
Shake your chains to earth like dew
Which in sleep had fallen on you -
Ye are many; they are few.

Offline violetta

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #51 on: October 02, 2009, 02:29:26 PM »
  It's a shame Juliana didn't stay longer in Russia, but then, Constantine does sound like a nightmare as a husband!
udzinsk
To be fair, he was perfectly decent husband to his second wife, and also a kindly and sensitive elder brother (and loyal younger one). At the time of his marriage to Anna he was far too young - as was she. There was a period of rapprochement mid-marriage when they got on well, but because of this he was blamed for "coarsening" her by those at court (apparently because she associated with his army friends). As K was criticized by men for being rough, so Anna was effectively called an airhead by older women....


yes,he was a decent husband for joanna grudzinska. countess lovitch wrote that "in belweder palace today looks like yesterday, yesterday like the day before yesterday and pray god i`d like this situation to continue forever". it took contantine 4 years to get permission to marry grudzinska because the dowager empress maria feodorovna didn`t want a divorce in her family. besides,grudzinska wasn`t equal by birth so maria feodorovna wanted him to marry another german princess. constantine and joanna grudzinska DID love each other

Offline violetta

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #52 on: March 24, 2010, 01:42:02 PM »
a few portraits of constantine pavlovich from national digital archives






Offline violetta

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #53 on: October 17, 2010, 01:31:43 PM »
anna feodorovna


Offline violetta

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #54 on: November 05, 2010, 11:28:16 AM »
Anna Feodorovna was Queen Victoria`a aunt. But how were related? I mean was she related through her mother, the Duchess of Kent?

Offline CountessKate

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #55 on: November 05, 2010, 11:38:46 AM »
Yes, Anna (born Julianne) was the 3rd child and 3rd daughter of Franz Frederick Anton, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld and his wife Augusta Gräfin Reuss zu Ebersdorf - her sister Victoria, the Duchess of Kent, was the 7th child and 4th daughter, 5 years younger.

Offline violetta

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #56 on: November 05, 2010, 01:28:58 PM »
Yes, Anna (born Julianne) was the 3rd child and 3rd daughter of Franz Frederick Anton, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld and his wife Augusta Gräfin Reuss zu Ebersdorf - her sister Victoria, the Duchess of Kent, was the 7th child and 4th daughter, 5 years younger.


thanks a lot!

Offline Hector

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #57 on: November 08, 2010, 07:40:31 PM »
Photograph of the Duchess of Kent circa 1860


No doubt it wasn't the sole factor, but didn't the experiences of Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna have an influence on how negatively her niece, Queen Victoria, would regard the Romanov dynasty and its Russian Empire?
« Last Edit: November 08, 2010, 07:46:29 PM by Hector »

Offline CountessKate

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #58 on: November 09, 2010, 05:43:20 AM »
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No doubt it wasn't the sole factor, but didn't the experiences of Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna have an influence on how negatively her niece, Queen Victoria, would regard the Romanov dynasty and its Russian Empire?

It didn't seem to be a problem initially - she got on well with her contemporaries, e.g. the sons of Nicholas I when she met them as a young woman, and her aunt's Russian experience was not referred to in connection with them at all.  It was later, when her children and grandchildren were grown and the Romanovs were marital prospects, that her views became much more negative.  She thought the Russians had messed her around over Alfred's marriage - on again, off again - and later, that they demanded too much of her court in accomodating the wife of a younger son.  The marriages of her two Hessian grandaughters made her 'frantic' - to quote her own words - as she was extremely possessive and thought her wishes weren't being sufficiently consulted, the Grand Dukes would take them too far away, the Romanov court had a clear history of being insufficiently respectful to her wishes and so on.  It seemed her own experiences were the basis of her negative views, rather than those of her aunt pre-disposing her to such attitudes.

Offline Hector

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Re: Anna Feodorovna
« Reply #59 on: November 09, 2010, 06:53:33 PM »
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No doubt it wasn't the sole factor, but didn't the experiences of Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna have an influence on how negatively her niece, Queen Victoria, would regard the Romanov dynasty and its Russian Empire?

It didn't seem to be a problem initially - she got on well with her contemporaries, e.g. the sons of Nicholas I when she met them as a young woman, and her aunt's Russian experience was not referred to in connection with them at all.  It was later, when her children and grandchildren were grown and the Romanovs were marital prospects, that her views became much more negative.  She thought the Russians had messed her around over Alfred's marriage - on again, off again - and later, that they demanded too much of her court in accomodating the wife of a younger son.  The marriages of her two Hessian grandaughters made her 'frantic' - to quote her own words - as she was extremely possessive and thought her wishes weren't being sufficiently consulted, the Grand Dukes would take them too far away, the Romanov court had a clear history of being insufficiently respectful to her wishes and so on.  It seemed her own experiences were the basis of her negative views, rather than those of her aunt pre-disposing her to such attitudes.

Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna's elder sister Antoinette was married to Empress Maria Feodorovna's younger brother, Alexander of Württemberg, and he was commander of the Russian calvary. Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna's youngest brother, Leopold, owed a lot to his Russian connection since after the French occupied Coburg, he went to Russia to get a commission in the Russian Army. His fame through the battles he fought as well his good looks earned him praise through the courts of Europe including Napoleon Bonaparte. This lead to him getting the attention of Princess Charlotte, heir of the Prince Regent, who he eventually married and started the House of Saxe-Coburg on its way to ruling many of the thrones of Europe.

So guess it's important to remember that Queen Victoria's other aunt, Princess Antoinette, was very happy in Russia. Actually Princess Antoinette's daughter later became Prince Albert's stepmother when she married her uncle. Prince Albert's father had eariler tried to marry a Russian Grand Duchess but his womanizing reputation prevented and he married Prince Albert's mother, the 16-year-old Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg.

Back to Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna. Here is what her brother, Belgian King Leopold I, wrote about her in his memoirs:
"In 1795, the Empress Catharine of Russia, being very anxious to conclude a match for the Grand Duke Constantine, her grandson, applied to M. de Budberg, a distinguished minister and general. She received, through his intervention, a visit from the eldest three princesses of Saxe-Coburg, all three possessing unquestionable beauty. The Grand Duke conceived an affection for Juliana, the youngest of the three; she was very pretty, but still a mere child, being only fifteen. Had the choice of Constantine fallen on Antonietta, she have filled admirably the position of Grand Duchess...
 
The empress-mother, in her preference for her two younger sons (the Grand Dukes Nicholas and Michael), did not desire the establishments of the two elder to be on a happy footing. Constantine himself was terribly cantankerous, and to crown the misfortune, the Grand Duke Alexander and his wife were Juliana's great friends, and supported her in her petty domestic differences. Had it not been for the empress-mother's shocking hypocrisy, things might have gone on well. The Grand Duke admired his wife very much, and she, with a lovable husband, would have been an excellent wife. She found herself miserable, and ended by leaving Russia in 1802."


In 1814, Leopold, then still an unmarried Prince of Saxe-Coburg, went with Grand Duke Constantine, who desired a reconciliation, to Elfenaau, near Berne, the place of residence of the Grand Duchess Anna Feodorovna. The overtures ended up being fruitless.


Pictures


Leopold I, King of the Belgians




Princess Antoinette of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld




Her husband Alexander of Württemberg



[
Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (born Princess Marie of Württemberg)




Duke Ernst I of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha




Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (born Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg)
« Last Edit: November 09, 2010, 07:09:23 PM by Hector »