Author Topic: King Umberto II of Italy & Marie Jose  (Read 226398 times)

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Offline Noloter

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there has never been a real strong union between Monarchy and Fascist regime...definitely Monarchists are not Fascists.
You are completely right, RomanovsFan4Ever.
As a matter of fact, Fascism's a strongly republican ideolgy; a real fascist (there still are fascists in the world, by the way? I think there aren't) would never tell you he's a monarchist. It's well known that Mussolini had been openly anti-monarchy since he was a socialist (he was even imprisoned in his early years, as he was considered him a subversive). When he became Prime Minister of Italy, he hid his republican sentiment as he thought Monarchy was only a useful tool for his Fascist Revolution, but he secretely despised Victor Emmanuel III (it's well known that Mussolini did everything he could in order to damage King Victor in his powers and his prerogatives) and above all Humber II, who never hid his aversion to Mussolini privately; and Mussolini, knowing all that, despised Humber almost more than he despised Victor Emmanuel. So much so he was intentioned not to accept a future succession from V.E.III to Humb.II to Italy's throne preferring Amedeo 3rd Duke of Aosta (who had fascist sympaties), he openly said that to his closest followers a lot of times (as count Galeazzo Ciano reported in his memories, if I'm not mistaking). After having been deposed and arrested in July 25th 1943, he resumed his anti-monarchy sentiment as he considered King Victor nothing but a traitor. The first anti-monarchy and anti-Savoy propaganda (the so called "King's flee" and many other lies about House of Savoy, for istance) started with Italian Social Republic's birth, as Mussolini wanted to convince Italians to join him against Allies and King Victor; communists/republicans simply resumed all of fascist lies about Monarchy during the referendum electoral campaign, and then they wrote said lies in History books for almost sixty years untill very recently.
Thinking it out, it's a paradox that today communists/republicans accuse monarchist of being fascists, while just fascists should be the real anti-monarchists...! :-P

Offline Eric_Lowe

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I agree. Maybe the true story of King Umberto II can be said. I heard a movie had been made on Umberto II's sister Malfada (Princess of Hesse). I wonder was it shown in Italy and was it popular ?

Offline Noloter

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I heard a movie had been made on Umberto II's sister Malfada (Princess of Hesse). I wonder was it shown in Italy and was it popular ?
I don't know about a movie, but I know about an Italian TV Serie on Princess Mafalda's tragedy. It went on the air in 2006 on Rai Uno (the main Italian public TV channel), and Princess Maria Gabriella of Savoy collaborated with the director due her historical knowleges (she's a somekind of autority abouth House of Savoy's History) while Clotilde Courau (Prince Emanuele Filiberto's wife) was part of the acting cast.
However the whole TV Serie showed King Victor Emmanuel III as a very cold man who didn't care for her daughter at all, as if he didn't want to do anything to save her, as if her death was only his fault (how untrue!). But, you know, as I said before you must always say Savoys are all bad, viles, cowards and evils...

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Yes. Although Princess Mafalda was also a member of the House of Savoy and heroine of the story. I wonder wasit well recieved in Italy ? Who played her brother Umberto II ?

Offline Noloter

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As they think her personal tragedy was her father's fault, Mafalda's the only House of Savoy's member of whom Historians speak well; she's always wrongly depicted as an somekind of anti-Savoy, a woman who felt being different from her relatives. Speaking well of Princess Mafalda means speaking bad of Victor Emmanuel III for those people.

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I wonder wasit well recieved in Italy ?
I don't precisely remember, but I think it got a lot of success. However I must correct myself: it went on the air on Canale 5, not on Rai Uno, I'm sorry for my mistake.

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Who played her brother Umberto II ?
It was Emanuele Fortunati, an Italian theatrical player.


Some other main actors were:
Stefania Rocca as Princess Mafalda of Savoy: http://www.fctp.it/media//film/208_standardphoto_1.jpg
Johannes Brandrup, a German actor, as Prince Philipp of Hesse: http://mauriziozaccaro.myblog.it/album/mafalda-di-savoia/1998091891.JPG
Carlo Dogliani as King Victor Emmanuel III: http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w162/noloter/carlodogliani.jpg

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Thanks for the information. I so appreciate it as do most who do not have the pleasure of viewing it. I wonder if it got shown in Germany ? I hope the family of Savoy and Hesse was happy with the portrayal of their mothers & fathers.

Offline Noloter

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I wonder if it got shown in Germany ?
Unfortunately I don't know...but I fear it was never shown in Germany or other countries; it was a just Italian production, a two-episodes TV Serie made by pourpose for Italian audience. But of course it's possible some foreign networks did buy broadcasting rights...it happened before.

However, if some of you are interested in it, I found the TV trailer of said TV Serie "Mafalda di Savoia - Il coraggio di una principessa" (Mafalda of Savoy - The courage of a princess) on youtube.com http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98s8eAkYLTk
It's not much, I know, but that's all I could do. After all, it would be impossible finding the whole TV Serie on the Net...

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Thanks for the link. There is another that show the whole series in 18 parts. I saw the first part...it was powerful. Sorry for OT.

RomanovsFan4Ever

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Thinking it out, it's a paradox that today communists/republicans accuse monarchist of being fascists, while just fascists should be the real anti-monarchists...! :-P

Yes, it's a real big paradox...it should be caused by a lack of knowledge of history, or since Fascism no longer exist, they need a "scapegoat" to consider as "Fascist", who knows?

Returning to Umberto II, it's odd to see that many people now are always ready to depict him as a "criminal", but when you try to ask to them what he did of so bad, they cannot give a real exhaustive explanation, but just the same vague answers.

A man who was against all dictatorial regimes of that time surely was not a "criminal"...
« Last Edit: March 06, 2010, 05:10:07 AM by RomanovsFan4Ever »

Offline Eric_Lowe

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I don't think Umberto II was a criminal. However he was not anti-fasist too, he sought to live with them. Unlike Princess Andrew of Greece, he did not saved the Jews there.

RomanovsFan4Ever

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The situation here in Italy was different than there in Greece, those horrors called "racial laws" were introduced here in Italy by the Fascist Regime (that was of course allied with the Nazi regime) in 1938, Umberto could not do anything to prevent it, since tecnically the power was in Mussolini's hands.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2010, 09:44:59 AM by RomanovsFan4Ever »

Offline Eric_Lowe

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I think Princess Andrew of Greece hid the Jews in her house (out of danger to herself) and contact underground to smuggle them out. She would have been deported to a concentration camp had she been found out. Umberto II was not that brave and would not risk that much for the innocent.

Offline Noloter

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I don't think Umberto II was a criminal. However he was not anti-fasist too, he sought to live with them. Unlike Princess Andrew of Greece, he did not saved the Jews there.
Well I don't think that not saving jews means not being anti-fascist. Queen Marie-Josè, for istance, didn't save any jew but she was an anti-fascist.

It's not a matter of braveness, to me. Greece's situation was far different from Italy's. Greece was under German military occupation, and nazis were everywhere in the country hunting jews; while Italy had been almost free from nazis untill 1943, and so people didn't really know about Italian jews' conditions under racial laws. Moreover, nazis thought Princess Andrew was their supporter as one of her sons-in-law was a member of the Nazi Party, so she was a kind of above-every-suspect person and she took advantage of that (don't get me wrong, I hold Princess Andrew's actions in high esteem); while Prince Humbert, as he never hid his lack of simpathy for fascist regime (and, above all, for Mussolini) too much, he was a kind of kept under special surveillance person by OVRA (in short, Mussolini's personal service secret), and he knew that. As a matter of fact, he even tried to start a kind of plot against Mussolini (as Lord Edward Halifax, who knew all that by an Italian high diplomat, repeports in his memories) helped by Grandi and count Ciano (and, possibly, by Marshall Badoglio) but Gestapo found it out and informed Mussolini; however Mussolini couldn't do anything against Crown Prince who wasn't openly compromised, but Ciano, Grandi, Bottai and Senise were all removed from their charges. Humbert was also a well-known anti-nazi (he was also in close relationships with Pope Pius XI, who strongly condamned Hitler's regime with his encyclical letter Mit brennender Sorge); he detested Hitler and he showed his despise for nazi-regime during Hitler's visit in Rome in 1938, so he was considered "dangerous" by Gestapo too.

You must remember that Humber had been educated to obbedience and respect for superiors since he was a little child, and that it was almost unthinkable to him revolting against his father or the regime; a famous quote of House of Savoy says "I Savoia regnano uno alla volta" (Savoys reign one at a time). And, above all, Humber was the Crown Prince, and so he couldn't compromise himself too much as he had very many responsabilities and duties before his Country and his People to risk of living them without a future King.

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Queen Maria José as inspector of the Red Cross.


Offline Carolath Habsburg

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I love that one. I colorized it thw last week *0*

Here another in uniform


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