Author Topic: Turkish Throne  (Read 16414 times)

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QueenEna1887

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Turkish Throne
« on: June 16, 2005, 05:59:02 AM »
Senior member of the Ottoman Empire's royal family is 92-year-old Ertugrul Osman. Their is little on him I don't know if her has children or not. I do know he is married but in what I read nothing mentions children. Does anyone have anymore info on him.

ipflo

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2005, 01:50:32 PM »
hi

I found the following information  about HIH Ertugrul Osman:

Almanach de Gotha/ http://www.almanachdegotha.com:

HIH Crown Prince Osman VI of Turkey is a member of the Comité de Patronage.

CROWN PRINCE Ertugrul OSMAN of TURKEY, Sehzade and Efendi Hazretleri, and 43rd Head of the Imperial House, known in exile as Ertogroul Osman, Sehzade and Efendi Hazretleri, born at Constantinople 18 Aug 1912; Son of Mehmed BurhanEddin (born at Yildiz Palace, Constantinople 19 Dec 1885; died at New York 15 June 1949).


I found the following article:

Ertugrul Osman, the senior member of the Ottoman royal family that was deposed before Turkey was declared a republic in 1923, has returned to Turkey on a visit after the government agreed to grant him Turkish citizenship, newspapers reported Tuesday.

Osman, the 92-year-old grandson of Sultan Abdulhamid II, has visited Turkey, but his return to Istanbul on Monday was the first time that he used a Turkish passport, which was issued last week, the daily Hurriyet and other newspapers said.

Members of the Ottoman family were forced into exile in 1924 after the collapse of the empire and their citizenship was revoked. Members of the family have since been allowed to return and have also taken Turkish citizenship.

Newspapers said Turkey agreed to restore Osman's citizenship after a recent meeting between Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Osman in New York. Osman lived in New York for the past 40 years.

Osman was quoted as saying he never taken citizenship in another country and that he had traveled to Turkey on previous occasions using travel documents issued by the United States and Albania.

"I was born a Turk and will die a Turk," he said.

His wife, Zeynep, said they planned to spend several days in Istanbul, the former capital of the Ottoman Empire, before traveling to Fethiye, a southern Mediterranean resort.

Osman and Turkish Foreign Ministry officials could not be reached for comment on Tuesday.

Osman's grandfather Abdulhamid came to the throne in 1876 and was ousted in 1909 amid strife in the empire. He was succeeded by his brothers, Mehmet V and later, Vahdeddin. He was the last Ottoman sultan and was ousted in October 1922 by Turkish nationalist forces.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2004/07/20/international1124EDT0543.DTL

On http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~royalty/pix/Ertugrul&Zeyneb.jpg you can see a picture of HIH and his wife.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~royalty/files/pix_turkey.html


According the genealogy of the Osman family on http://www.4dw.net/royalark/Turkey/turkey15.htm he does not have any children. So when he dies, the new senior member of the Osman family will be the next oldest man of his generation or the oldest of the generation behind him, as far as I understood the Osman succession.

Hope this helps,

ipflo

ipflo

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2005, 01:55:21 PM »
http://www.4dw.net/royalark/Turkey/turkey.htm also contains the rules of succession:

RULES OF SUCCESSION:
Hereditary, in order of birth, from one brother to the next, or one cousin to another, until all the survivors of a generation have succeeded in turn. On the death of the last brother, the succession passes to the eldest born son of the deceased males of the previous generation (not necessarily the eldest son of the eldest brother).


STYLES AND TITLES:
The Sovereign: Sultan (given name) Khan, Sovereign of the House of Osman, Sultan of Sultans, Khan of Khans, Commander of the Faithful and Successor of the Prophet of the Lord of the Universe, Protector of the Holy Cities of Mecca, Medina and Jerusalem, Emperor of The Three Cities of Constantinople, Andrinopole and Bursa, and of the Cities of Damascus and Cairo, of all Azerbaijan, of the Magris, of Barka, of Kairuan, of Aleppo, of Arabic Iraq and of Ajim, of Basra, of El Hasa, of Dilen, of Raka, of Mosul, of Parthia, of Diyarbakir, of Cicilia, of the Vilayets of Erzurum, of Sivas, of Adana, of Karaman, Van, of Barbary, of Abyssinia, of Tunisia, of Tripoli, of Damascus, of Cyprus, of Rhodes, of Candia, of the Vilayet of the Morea, of the Marmara Sea, the Black Sea and also its coasts, of Anatolia, of Rumelia, Baghdad, Kurdistan, Greece, Turkistan, Tartary, Circassia, of the two regions of Kabarda, of Georgia, of the plain of Kypshak, of the whole country of the Tartars, of Kefa and of all the neighbouring countries, of Bosnia and its dependencies, of the City and Fort of Belgrade, of the Vilayet of Serbia, with all the castles, forts and cities, of all Albania, of all Iflak and Bogdania, as well as all the dependencies and borders, and many others countries and cities.
The Heir Apparent: Daulatlu Najabatlu Vali Ahad-i-Sultanat (given name) Effendi Hazlatlari, i.e. Crown Prince, with the style of His Imperial Highness.
The senior wives of the Heir Apparent: Vali Ahad Zevcesi, equivalent to Crown Princess, but not normally translated.
The mother of the reigning Sovereign: Daulatlu Ismatlu (given name) Validi Sultana 'Aliyat us-Shan Hazratlari, with the style of Her Majesty.
The first four official wives of the Sovereign, according to Islamic law: Daulatlu Ismatlu (given name) Bash Kadin Effendi Hazratlari, Daulatlu Ismatlu (given name) 2nd Kadin Effendi Hazratlari, Daulatlu Ismatlu (given name) 3rd Kadin Effendi Hazratlari, and Daulatlu Ismatlu (given name) 4th Kadin Effendi Hazratlari, with the style of Her Majesty. They were additionally styled Haseki Sultana if they had born a son to the Sultan, Haseki Kadin Effendi if they had only borne daughters.
The next four favourite wives of the Sovereign: Daulatlu Bash Iqbal (given name) Khanum Effendi Hazratlari, Daulatlu 2nd Iqbal (given name) Khanum Effendi Hazratlari, Daulatlu 3rd Iqbal (given name) Khanum Effendi Hazratlari, and Daulatlu 4th Iqbal (given name) Khanum Effendi Hazratlari, with the style of Her Highness. Usually promoted to official wife (Kadin Effendi), on the death of one of the latter. Also borne by the mothers of sons of a Sovereign.
The next four ladies of the Sovereign's harem: styled (given name) Bash Gozde, 2nd Gozde, 3rd Gozde, and 4th Gozde.
The next four junior ladies of the Sovereign's harem: styled (given name) Bash Paik, 2nd Paik, 3rd Paik, and 4th Paik.
Male descendants of a Sovereign in the male line: Daulatlu Najabatlu Shahzada Sultan (given name) Hazretleri Effendi, i.e. Prince (given name) Effendi, with the style of His Imperial Highness.
Female descendants of a sovereign in the male line: Daulatlu Ismatlu (given name) Sultana 'Aliyat us-Shan Hazratleri, i.e. Princess with the style of Her Imperial Highness.
The first four official wives of Imperial Princes: (given name) Khanum Effendi Effendi Hazratlari.
The husbands of Imperial Princesses: Damad-i-Shahyari (given name) Bey Effendi, the latter, only if not posessed of a higher rank or title, with the style of His Highness.
The sons of Imperial Princesses: Sultanzada (given name) Bey-Effendi, i.e. Prince, with the style of His Highness.
The sons of Imperial Princesses: (given name) Khanum-Sultana, i.e. Princess, with the style of Her Highness.
The grandsons of Imperial Princesses in the male line: (given name) Bey.
The granddaughters of Imperial Princesses in the male line: (given name) Khanum.

The Osmanli Dynasty traces its origins to Osman Khan Ghazi, founder of the Turkish Empire and son of Ertugrul, leader of the Kayi clan of the Oghuz tribe, during the late 13th century. The tribe reputedly descends from Noah, through his grandson, Oghuz.
 
Osman's successors remained conquerers for several generations, ever extending the boundaries of their Empire on all sides. The conquest of Constantinople in 1453, though the jewel in the crown and the pride of their posessions, did not serve as the culmination of their efforts. Baghdad, Jerusalem, Mecca and Medina, the Lavant, Syria, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Libya, Arabia, Algeria, Tunisia, the Crimea, Greece and the Balkans, and parts of Hungary all fell to their sway. The Osmanli dynasty had secured, for themselves, the position of the greatest Islamic dynasty in history. On two occasions, they threatened Western Europe itself. Vienna, capital of the Holy Roman Empire, faced two bitter sieges in 1529 and 1683. However, the failure of the last, proved to be the nadir of the empire.
 
The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries provided a long period of slow decline. New or re-invigorated European powers, in the form of Russia and Austria gnawed away at the western provinces of the Empire. In time this encouraged many of the subject races to assert their independence. By the end of the nineteenth century most of the European and Caucasian territories had been lost, save Bosnia, Albania, Macedonia and some parts of modern day Greece and Bulgaria. In the southern Meditterranean, Egypt and Cyprus were under British control, Crete and Samos under international supervision, and Algeria and Tunisia were under the French.
 
The dawn of the twentieth century saw further reverses and losses of territory in the Balkans, leaving Albania a lawless land, cut-off from Turkey proper. Italy entered the general scramble, siezing Rhodes and the Dodecanese and invading Cyrenaica and Tripoli. On the eve of the Great War, the first stirrings of the Arab renaissance were becoming apparent. Jewish migration and settlement in Palestine increased rapidly. The sick man of Europe was clearly on its last legs.
 
Disasterously, though perhaps understandably, the rulers of Turkey chose to side with the Central European powers on the outbreak of War. Believing in the magic of the Khalifate they proclaimed Holy War, expecting Muslims under British, French and Russian rule to rize up in their defence. Quite the reverse ensued. Not only did they fail to rise to the defence of the Khaliphate; they contributed very significantly in ensuring that their rulers would be victorius. Surrounded by enemies on all sides, Turkey saw its remaining subject peoples throwing in their lot with the allies, in hope of achieving nationhood.
 
Wars end left Turkey with little more than Turkey proper, Armenia and parts of Kurdistan. Nationalist generals, including Mustafa Kemal, seized power in the rest of the country and began a process of consolidating their position. When the old Sultan Muhammad V died in 1918, they saw their chance. The allies had occupied the seat of the Sultan, cutting him off from the rest of the country. A successful war against Greece entrenched the military oligarchy in the positions. They established their capital at Angora (Ankara) and began chipping away at the monarchy. After four years of steady effort, they succeeded in removing Sultan Muhammad VI from all temporal authority in the state. He abdicated in disgust and went into exile.
 
The anti religious Ankara regime then secured the election of Sultan 'Abdu'l-Majid Khan I as Khalif by the National Assembly in 1922. Clearly meant as a sop to secure the loyalty of tradional minded elements within the country, they tired of their own fiction within two years. They abolshed the Kaliphate and expelled the entire Ottoman dynasty on the 3rd ofMarch 1924. The regime then established the Turkish republic with Mustafa Kemal Pasha, transformed into Kemal Ataturk, as President, Father of the Nation and dictator, with democratic pretensions.
 
After their expulsion from Turkey, the Imperial family dispersed to several destinations, San Remo and the South of France, Beirut and Alexandria, being the favoured places of exile. They were not permitted to return to Turkey until 1953, when Ataturk and his lieutenants were safely at peace with his maker.

ipflo

Osmanli

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2008, 12:41:37 AM »
The Turkish Throne and HIH Ertugrul Osman,

He is the Head of the Royal Family and the senior member, but we are almost one thousand descendants of the Ottoman Royal  Family. 
Off course many of us have been born abroad but we still part of it, there is no danger of dissolving our Dinasty.

Offline Lucien

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Turkish Throne
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2008, 10:46:52 AM »
Je Maintiendrai

Robert_Hall

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2008, 11:25:21 AM »
Thank you, Lucien. I am  hoping to go to Istanbul, perhaps this year, and tat site  will be very helpful in my planning.

kmerov

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2010, 07:05:17 PM »
Istanbul has some of the most impressing Palaces. Very splendid, European and Oriental at the same time. I like Istanbul very much. Appearantly the decline of the Ottoman Empire in the 19th century did not affect the Sultans lavish building plans.

Offline newfan

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2010, 09:51:12 PM »
Who is the senior member now ?

Robert_Hall

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2010, 03:34:36 AM »
As of 2009 the current and 44th head of the Imperial Hose is Osman Bayezid III, great grandson of  Abdul Mecid I

Offline newfan

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2010, 11:46:41 AM »
Thank you Robert
What does he do and where does he lives?

Robert_Hall

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2010, 01:59:25 PM »
Good question. Frankly, I do not know much, but  have been told he is a retired banker and lives in Paris. Have  no idea if this is true.
 The Ottoman succession i different than most- the oldest living descendant of the last reigning Sultan inherits the head of house. It gets  complicated, as there are hundreds of Ottomans running about.in all walks of life.

kmerov

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2010, 07:17:24 PM »
The last Prince of the Ottoman Empire, Prince Osman Nami Osmanoglu recently passed away in Istanbul, and was buried in the presence of the Prime Minister of Turkey,Tayip Erdogan.


Rani

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2010, 07:42:27 PM »
A blog about the Sultans, in Turkish

http://osmanlidonemi.blogcu.com/

Offline newfan

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Re: Turkish Throne
« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2010, 08:55:24 PM »
Thank you for the link Rani